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Pat Boone On The President


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Pat Boone on the president
When you have read what Pat Boone wrote about Obama (below), you may want to click on the link to "Snopes", which brings up a page telling you that this is an actual letter written by Pat Boone - and very well written, I might add. This is an excellent commentary that should be read by every American.
The President Without A Country
- Pat Boone
"We're no longer a Christian nation." - President Barack Obama, June 2009
" America has been arrogant." - President BarackObama
"After 9/11, America didn't always live up to her ideals."- President Barack Obama
"You might say that America is a Muslim nation."- President Barack Obama, Egypt 2009
Thinking about these and other statements made by the man who wears the title of president, I keep wondering what country he believes he's president of.
In one of my very favorite stories, Edward Everett Hale's "The Man without a Country," a young Army lieutenant named Philip Nolan stands condemned for treason during the Revolutionary War, having come under the influence of Aaron Burr. When the judge asks him if he wishes to say anything before sentence is passed, young Nolan defiantly exclaims, "Damn the United States ! I wish I might never hear of the United States again!"
The stunned silence in the courtroom is palpable, pulsing. After a long pause, the judge soberly says to the angry lieutenant: "You have just pronounced your own sentence. You will never hear of the United States again.. I sentence you to spend the rest of your life at sea, on one or another of this country's naval vessels - under strict orders that no one will ever speak to you again about the country you have just cursed."
And so it was. Philip Nolan was taken away and spent the next 40 years at sea, never hearing anything but an occasional slip of the tongue about America . The last few pages of the story, recounting Nolan's dying hours in his small stateroom - now turned into a shrine to the country he foreswore - never fail to bring me to tears. And I find my own love for this dream, this miracle called America, refreshed and renewed. I know how blessed and unique we are.
But reading and hearing the audacious, shocking statements of the man who was recently elected our president - a young black man living the impossible dream of millions of young Americans, past and present, black and white - I want to ask him, "Just what country do you think you're president of?"
You surely can't be referring to the United States of America, can you? America is emphatically a Christian nation, and has been from its inception! Seventy percent of her citizens identify themselves as Christian. The Declaration of Independence and our Constitution were framed, written and ratified by Christians. It's because this was, and is, a nation built on and guided by Judeo-Christian biblical principles that you, sir, have had the inestimable privilege of being elected her president.
You studied law at Harvard, didn't you, sir? You taught constitutional law in Chicago ? Did you not ever read the statement of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and an author of the landmark "Federalist Papers": "Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers - and it is the duty, as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian nation - to select and prefer Christians for their rulers"?
In your studies, you surely must have read the decision of the Supreme Court in 1892: "Our lives and our institutions must necessarily be based upon and embody the teachings of the Redeemer of mankind. It is impossible that it should be otherwise; and in this sense and to this extent our civilization and our institutions are emphatically Christian."
Did your professors have you skip over all the high-court decisions right up till the mid 1900's that echoed and reinforced these views and intentions?Did you pick up the history of American jurisprudence only in 1947, when for the first time a phrase coined by Thomas Jefferson about a "wall of separation between church and state" was used to deny some specific religious expression - contrary to Jefferson's intent with that statement?
Or, wait a minute: were your ideas about America's Christianity formed during the 20 years you were a member of the Trinity United Church of Christ under your pastor, Jeremiah Wright? Is that where you got the idea that "America is no longer a Christian nation"? Is this where you, even as you came to call yourself a Christian, formed the belief that "America has been arrogant"?
Even if that's the understandable explanation of your damning of your country and accusing the whole nation (not just a few military officials trying their best to keep more Americans from being murdered by jihadists) of "not always living up to her ideals,"how did you come up with the ridiculous, alarming notion that we might be "considered a Muslim nation"?
Is it because there are some 2 million or more Muslims living here, trying to be good Americans? Out of a current population of over 300 million, 70 percent of whom are Christians? Does that make us, by any rational definition, a "Muslim nation"?
Why are we not, then, a "Chinese nation"? A "Korean nation"? Even a "Vietnamese nation"? There are even more of these distinct groups in America than Muslims. And if the distinction you're trying to make is a religious one, why is America not "a Jewish nation"? There's actually a case to be made for the latter, because our Constitution - and the success of our Revolution and founding - owe a deep debt to our Jewish brothers.
Have you stopped to think what an actual Muslim America would be like? Have you ever really spent much time in Iran ? Even in Egypt ? You, having been instructed in Islam as a kid at a Muslim school in Indonesia and saying you still love the call to evening prayers, can surely picture our nation founded on the Quran, not the Judeo-Christian Bible, and living under Shariah law. Can't you? You do recall Muhammad's directives [surah 9:5,73] to "break the cross" and "kill the infidel"?
It seems increasingly and painfully obvious that you are more influenced by your upbringing and questionable education than most suspected. If you consider yourself the president of a people who are "no longer Christian," who have "failed to live up to our ideals," who "have been arrogant," and might even be "considered Muslim" - you are president of a country most Americans don't recognize.
Could it be you are a president without a country?
All who love their Christian beliefs, and their country, forward to all in your address book
.

 

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Pat Boone on the president

 

 

Maybe you would like to explain why anyone would give a f--k what some jack leg off the street like Boone would have to say. I imagine pretty much all the fake Christians say similar things, It's in their contract with the radical rep party. Just doing what they were paid to do. Even if he had nothing but good to say about Obama, I still don't think I could find what he had to say important at all. I can see how it would thrill a dude like you that is continuously looking for a large pile of horse s--t, and feels really lucky when he is waist deep in it.

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Maybe you would like to explain why anyone would give a f--k what some jack leg off the street like Boone would have to say. I imagine pretty much all the fake Christians say similar things, It's in their contract with the radical rep party. Just doing what they were paid to do. Even if he had nothing but good to say about Obama, I still don't think I could find what he had to say important at all. I can see how it would thrill a dude like you that is continuously looking for a large pile of horse s--t, and feels really lucky when he is waist deep in it.

I am not concerned with fake Christians. I have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. To me, fake Christians are foul creatures; as are devout Muslims.

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"You might say that America is a Muslim nation."- President Barack Obama, Egypt 2009

 

The comment in was cherry picked, the exact statement was:

 

"And one of the points I want to make is, is that if you actually took the number of Muslim Americans, we'd be one of the largest Muslim countries in the world," Mr. Obama said. "And so there's got to be a better dialogue and a better understanding between the two peoples."
Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/patboone.asp#OYyhvhQo4RiE5uox.99

 

"We're no longer a Christian nation." - President Barack Obama, June 2009

 

President Obama actually uttered. Here it is in its entirety:

Whatever we once were, we are no longer a Christian nation —
at least, not just; we are also a Jewish nation, a Muslim nation, a Buddhist nation, and a Hindu nation, and a nation of nonbelievers.

He also didn't say, "We're no longer a Christian nation." His quote was distorted and taken out of context.

His actual quote was, "Given the increasing diversity of America's population, the dangers of sectarianism have never been greater. Whatever we once were, we are no longer just a Christian nation; we are also a Jewish nation, a Muslim nation, a Buddhist nation, a Hindu nation, and a nation of nonbelievers." Check it out:

 

Not only is he lying to his readers, he's aiding America's enemies... at least that's what he said.

In 2006, after the Dixie Chicks criticized President Bush,
Pat Boone, himself an entertainer, said: "If I were the president of Iran, if I were Osama bin Laden or any of the terrorist organizers and I could have my wish list totally... I couldn't ask for anything better than for America's entertainers to bash their president, denigrate him, make him seem like an idiot and a self-serving fool, and then have the media go along with it and promote it like crazy and try to undermine the whole war effort."

He also said: ""I think it's outrageous for any of these performers to be bashing our president the way they are
." Read it yourself:

There is a lot of crazy stuff on the internet these days, but it's important to make sure it's true.

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"You might say that America is a Muslim nation."- President Barack Obama, Egypt 2009

 

The comment in was cherry picked, the exact statement was:

 

"And one of the points I want to make is, is that if you actually took the number of Muslim Americans, we'd be one of the largest Muslim countries in the world," Mr. Obama said. "And so there's got to be a better dialogue and a better understanding between the two peoples."

Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/patboone.asp#OYyhvhQo4RiE5uox.99

 

"We're no longer a Christian nation." - President Barack Obama, June 2009

 

President Obama actually uttered. Here it is in its entirety:

Let me ask you a simple ( yes or no answer ) question. I have asked it for 5 years with no up front reply. I have gotten many - change the subject replies - go off on tangents replies - and the usual character assassination replies. Here ya go, and remember, a YES or a No answer. Have you ever heard Barack Obama use the term - say the words: Muslim - Islamic Radicals, Muslim - Islamic Terrorists, Muslim - Islamic Extremists. YES or NO.

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Let me ask you a simple ( yes or no answer ) question. I have asked it for 5 years with no up front reply. I have gotten many - change the subject replies - go off on tangents replies - and the usual character assassination replies. Here ya go, and remember, a YES or a No answer. Have you ever heard Barack Obama use the term - say the words: Muslim - Islamic Radicals, Muslim - Islamic Terrorists, Muslim - Islamic Extremists. YES or NO.

And I - we, wait.

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Let me ask you a simple ( yes or no answer ) question. I have asked it for 5 years with no up front reply. I have gotten many - change the subject replies - go off on tangents replies - and the usual character assassination replies. Here ya go, and remember, a YES or a No answer. Have you ever heard Barack Obama use the term - say the words: Muslim - Islamic Radicals, Muslim - Islamic Terrorists, Muslim - Islamic Extremists. YES or NO.

He says "Islamic Extremists" all of the time. What is your point?

 

I don't think I've heard anyone, but maybe an ignorant tea bagger use a term like Muslim-Islamic Terrorists. That's just stupid, and racist when you take out the "extremist" part.

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Let me ask you a simple ( yes or no answer ) question. I have asked it for 5 years with no up front reply. I have gotten many - change the subject replies - go off on tangents replies - and the usual character assassination replies. Here ya go, and remember, a YES or a No answer. Have you ever heard Barack Obama use the term - say the words: Muslim - Islamic Radicals, Muslim - Islamic Terrorists, Muslim - Islamic Extremists. YES or NO.

 

 

Let me ask you a simple ( yes or no answer ) question. I have asked it for many years with no up front reply. I have gotten many - change the subject replies - go off on tangents replies - and the usual character assassination replies. Here ya go, and remember, a YES or a No answer. Have you ever heard any member of the Republican party use the term - say the words: Christian-Radicals, Christian-Extremists. YES or NO.

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Let me ask you a simple ( yes or no answer ) question. I have asked it for many years with no up front reply. I have gotten many - change the subject replies - go off on tangents replies - and the usual character assassination replies. Here ya go, and remember, a YES or a No answer. Have you ever heard any member of the Republican party use the term - say the words: Christian-Radicals, Christian-Extremists. YES or NO.

 

jimsouth: No

 

I haven't heard Republicans use those terms; but I believe there are many phony Christians who could be labeled radical - extremists. The fringe screwballs who use Christianity as the foundation for their lunacy are about as far from the teachings of Christ as someone can get. Not so with those who follow Mohammed. feel free to post the sites that report this behavior from Christians ( even the phony in name only Christians ).

 

 

 


 


Islamic Terror Attacks for First Part of 2013

 

 

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2012

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2011

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2010

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2009

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2008

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2007

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2006

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2005

Islamic Terror Attacks for 2004

Islamic Attacks from September 11th, 2001 through 2003

About the List of Terrorist Attacks by Muslims



Yow, more Islamic truth: adultery-lower.jpg
Muslim countries have lower rates of adultery.



I do not believe this would go over very well with Jesus Christ. Just me.



See, this behavior is part of Mohammed's teachings - doctrines.



As is pedophilia - honor killing - FGM - sex with animals & children - suicide in the name of Islam.



Almost forgot to mention ( shudder ) necrophilia. Is it possible for these sub humans to dig much deeper into depravity?

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When Christianity becomes lethal

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-faith/post/norway-attacks-when-christianity-becomes-lethal/2011/07/25/gIQAPRw5YI_blog.html

 

Anders Behring Breivik has now “acknowledged” that he carried out the horrific series of attacks in Norway that have left at least 76 dead. He has been described by police there as a “Christian fundamentalist.” His rambling “manifesto” calls for a “Christian war to defend Europe against the threat of Muslim domination.” Christians should not turn away from this information, but try to come to terms with the temptations to violence in the theologies of right-wing Christianity.

Breivik’s chosen targets were political in nature, emblematic of his hatred of “multiculturalism” and “left-wing political ideology.” This does not mean that the Christian element in his ultra-nationalist views is irrelevant. The religious and political views in right-wing ideologies are mutually reinforcing, and ignoring or dismissing the role played by certain kinds of Christian theology in such extremism is distorting.

 

Christians are often reluctant to see these connections between their religion and extreme violence. They will dismiss it as “madness” rather than confront the Christian element directly. As a woman interviewed in Oslo observed, “If Islamic people do something bad, you think, ‘Oh, it’s Muslims,’ ” she said. “But if a white Protestant does something bad, you just think he’s mad. That’s something we need to think about.”

 

Exactly right. Christians do need to think about that, both in Europe and in the United States. Examining your own religion in its historic as well as contemporary connection to lethal violence is something Christians tend to shun. Stephen Prothero describes this dynamic in his students: “When I was a professor at Georgia State University in Atlanta, I required my students to read Nazi theology. I wanted them to understand how some Christian bent the words of the Bible into weapons aimed at Jews and how these weapons found their mark at Auschwitz and Dachau. My Christian students responded to these disturbing readings with one disturbing voice: the Nazis were not real Christians, they informed me, since real Christians would never kill Jews in crematories.” Prothero confesses he found their response “terrifying.”

 

To get past this Christian tendency to excuse Christianity from complicity in mass violence, I think it is important to understand this is a theological issue, not an indictment of the whole Christian faith, and at bottom a form of temptation. I believe that certain theological constructions of Christianity “tempt” individuals and groups to violence; combined with right-wing political ideologies, these views can give a divine justification to the use of lethal force. As with Islam, or Judaism, or Hinduism or any other religion, this does not make the religion itself inherently violent, but neither does it make the religious interpretations beside the point. They are very much to the point.

 

When I consider the theological perspectives that “tempt” some Christians to justify hatred and even violence against others, such as, in this case in Norway, the following perspectives seem especially prevalent: 1) making supremacist claims that Christianity is the “only” truth; 2) holding the related view that other religions are not merely wrong, but “evil” and “of the devil”; 3) being highly selective in the use of biblical literalism, for example ignoring the justice claims of the prophets and using biblical texts that seem to justify violence; 4) identifying Christianity with a dominant race and/or nation; 5) believing that violence is divinely justified to “cleanse” or “purify” as in a “holy war”; and 6) believing the end of the world is at hand.

 

Such theological views, I have found, are more accurate predictors of where political extremism and certain interpretations of Christian theology will mutually contribute to justifying lethal violence. This kind of specificity is more helpful, in my view, than the term “Christian fundamentalism.” Fundamentalism is a more historical term, dating from the “fundamentalist-modernist” controversy in the early part of the 20th century in the United States, and I find it is less helpful today in understanding right-wing Christianity.

 

A more comprehensive view of the mutually-reinforcing role of extremist Christianity and extremist political views is essential, given the spread of right-wing extremism and its lethal capacity “not just in Norway but across Europe, where opposition to Muslim immigrants, globalization, the power of the European Union and the drive toward multiculturalism has proven a potent political force and, in a few cases, a spur to violence.”

 

The rise of this type of right-wing extremism is not confined to Europe but is also a growing threat in the U.S. It is therefore even more alarming that the Southern Poverty Law Center is calling attention to the fact that the Department of Homeland Security has apparently scaled back its department “responsible for analyzing security threats from non-Islamic domestic extremists.” According to Daryl Johnson, the principal author of the April 7, 2009, report “Right-wing Extremism: Current Economic and Political Climate Fueling Resurgence in Radicalization and Recruitment,” the focus on domestic, non-Islamic terror threats, was cut back after his report was leaked. The leaked report precipitated a “firestorm” of protest from conservatives who “wrongly claimed it equated conservatives with terrorists.”

 

Especially in light of events in Norway, it is clear Mr. Johnson was just doing what Homeland Security is supposed to do, namely track dangerous domestic extremism, regardless of the source, in order to prevent violent extremism.

 

The religious element in terrorist extremism cannot either be ignored or overblown. It is an important part of the whole equation. In this Norwegian case, conservative Christianity and right-wing, nationalist political ideologies mutually reinforced and tempted each other, and the acts of a person like Anders Behring Breivik were apparently the result. Looking closely at theological interpretations can illuminate how the mass killing of people to accomplish a political end can be justified as right and even a moral imperative in the eyes of individuals and groups wanting to impose their political views through violence.

 

It is absolutely critical that Christians not turn away from the Christian theological elements in such religiously inspired terrorism. We must acknowledge these elements in Christianity and forthrightly reject these extremist interpretations of our religion. How can we ask Muslims to do the same with Islam, if we won’t confront extremists distorting Christianity?

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http://www.splcenter.org/blog/2013/08/16/judge-clears-path-for-groundbreaking-lawsuit-against-scott-lively/
Judge Clears Path for Groundbreaking Lawsuit against Scott Lively


Josh Glasstetter on August 16, 2013, Posted in Anti-LGBT, Extremist Propaganda




Scott Lively, one of the most virulent anti-gay activists on the scene today

U.S. District Judge Michael Ponser cleared the path on Wednesday for a groundbreaking lawsuit to proceed against Scott Lively. Lively, president of the virulently anti-gay Abiding Truth Ministries, is being sued by the LGBT rights group Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMU) for his pivotal role in promoting the persecution of LGBT Ugandans.

SMU alleged in its complaint that Lively and his allies “devised and carried out a program of persecution” and “strategies to dehumanize, demonize, silence, and further criminalize” LGBT Ugandans. They are seeking damages, a finding that Lively violated international law and an injunction against future efforts to persecute their organization and community.

Lively is one of the most virulent anti-gay activists on the scene today. He authored the infamous revisionist history The Pink Swastika, which claims that homosexuality was at the root of the Nazi Party and Holocaust. He makes similar claims about the Rwandan genocide. Judge Ponser described (pdf) these arguments as “bordering on ludicrous” in his Wednesday ruling.

Lively’s “ludicrous” arguments have had very real — and incredibly destructive — consequences for LGBT Ugandans, and that’s the basis of the lawsuit. SMU is suing, with assistance from the Center for Constitutional Rights, under the Alien Torts Statute, which allows foreign nationals to sue in American courts for violations of international law.

Lively sought to have the case dismissed by arguing (pdf), among other things, that “international norms do not bar persecution based on sexual orientation or gender identity with sufficient clarity and historical lineage” for such persecution to be covered by the Alien Torts Statute. He also claimed by way of a recent Supreme Court ruling that that statute could not pertain to his activities outside the U.S.

Judge Ponser dismissed (pdf) these objections, finding that Lively carried out the alleged activities in both the U.S. and Uganda. He also found that the “widespread, systematic persecution of LGBTI people constitutes a crime against humanity that unquestionably violates international norms.”

That is exactly what Lively sought to carry out beginning in 2002 and running through 2009. He based his efforts on his book, Redeeming the Rainbow, in which Posner said he “advocates criminalizing advocacy on behalf of LGBTI people and attributing acts of sexual violence against children to LGBTI individuals’ purported obsession with pedophilia.” He consistently stoked fears among Ugandan parents that gays and lesbians were actively seeking to sexually abuse and “recruit” their children.

The efforts by Lively and his allies to deny basic human rights to LGBT Ugandans culminated with the introduction of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill in April 2009 in the Ugandan Parliament. The legislation, better known as the “kill the gays” bill, called for the death penalty for “aggravated homosexuality” (that is, a person who has engaged repeatedly in sex with a member of the same sex).

Sadly, Lively’s pernicious influence can be seen far beyond Uganda. Russia passed a law in June that bans so-called “gay propaganda” directed at minors. The law imposes fines and even jail time for publishing material promoting equal rights for gays and lesbians if it is seen by minors. It also imposes fines on gay pride rallies.

Back in 2007, Lively went on a 50-city speaking tour to lay the groundwork, describing it like this: “The purpose of my visit was to bring a warning about the homosexual political movement which has done much damage to my country and which has now taken root in Russia. This is a very fast-growing social cancer that will destroy the family foundations of your society if you do not take immediate, effective action to stop it.”

He explicitly called on the Russian government to enact legislation similar to what was passed this June, urging it, in his words, to “criminalize the public advocacy of homosexuality. My philosophy is to leave homosexuals alone if they keep their lifestyle private, and not to force them into therapy if they don’t want it. However, homosexuality is destructive to individuals and to society and it should never publicly promoted. The easiest way to discourage ‘gay pride’ parades and other homosexual advocacy is to make such activity illegal in the interest of public health and morality.”

Lively has racked up a number of victories in his effort to demonize and persecute LGBT people around the world. That’s why Judge Ponser’s ruling on Wednesday is so encouraging. Lively, for the first time, is facing serious consequences for the lives he’s ruined in Uganda. And if SMU succeeds, one can imagine similar suits from Russia and elsewhere. Already, a related court battle over the continued criminalization of gay sex, one that could have repercussions in other Caribbean countries, is taking place in Belize. The days of American extremists like Lively exporting their bigotry abroad could soon come to an end.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/07/opinion/bergen-terrorism-wisconsin/index.html


 


Washington (CNN) -- The word "terrorism" in the United States usually brings to mind plots linked in some way to al Qaeda, while the danger posed to the public by white supremacists, anti-abortion extremists and other right-wing militants is often overlooked.

 

 

Militants linked to al Qaeda or inspired by jihadist ideology have carried out four terrorist attacks in the United States since September 11, which have resulted in 17 deaths. Thirteen of them were in a shooting incident at Fort Hood, Texas, in November 2009.

By contrast, right-wing extremists have committed at least eight lethal terrorist attacks in the United States that have resulted in the deaths of nine people since 9/11, according to data compiled by the New America Foundation.

Peter Bergen.

And if, after investigation, Sunday's attack on the Sikh temple in Wisconsin is included in this count, the death toll from right-wing terrorism in the U.S. over the past decade rises to 15.

The shooting suspect, Wade Michael Page, posed with a Nazi flag on his Facebook page and has played a prominent role in "white power" music groups. The FBI is investigating the case as a "domestic terrorist-type incident."

A particular concern for law enforcement is the Sovereign Citizens movement, whose adherents reject all U.S. laws as well as taxation and American currency. An FBI report published in 2011 said "lone-offender sovereign-citizen extremists have killed six law enforcement officers" since 2000.

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120806090138-exp-lawrence-shooter-militaSikh temple gunman was Army vet
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120807015842-ac-anderson-cooper-sikh-tem
120807015842-ac-anderson-cooper-sikh-temPeaceful worship shattered in Sikh temple
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120806101327-wisconsin-sikh-temple-shoot
120806101327-wisconsin-sikh-temple-shootWhy did gunman open fire on Sikh temple?

The numbers in the New America Foundation database may well understate the toll of violence from right-wing extremists. Another FBI study reported that between January 1, 2007, and October 31, 2009, white supremacists were involved in 53 acts of violence, 40 of which were assaults directed primarily at African-Americans, seven of which were murders and the rest of which were threats, arson and intimidation. Most of these were treated as racially motivated crimes rather than political acts of violence, i.e. terrorism.

 

In the past year, the FBI has concluded investigations into a number of right-wing extremists, in some cases securing lengthy sentences for violent plots. In December, Kevin Harpham of Spokane, Washington, was sentenced to 32 years for planting a bomb at the site of a Martin Luther King Jr. parade. City workers found the bag containing the bomb an hour before the streets filled with parade-goers.

 

After 9/11, there was great concern that al Qaeda or an allied group would launch a terrorist attack involving chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) weapons. But in the past decade, there is no evidence that jihadist extremists in the United States have acquired or attempted to acquire material to construct CBRN weapons.

 

By contrast, 11 right-wing and left-wing extremists have managed to acquire CBRN material that they planned to use against the public, government employees or both.

 

Not included in those numbers were four elderly Georgia men who were arrested in November, accused of plotting to produce the deadly toxin ricin, which they wanted to throw out of a car window as they drove along a highways in the eastern and southern United States. The government says that one of the men, Frederick Thomas, was recorded by an informant as saying, "There is no way for us, as militiamen, to save this country, to save Georgia, without doing something that's highly, highly illegal: murder."

 

Right-wing extremist individuals over the past decade in the United States were as likely to use violence as a means to express their political or social beliefs as those motivated by Osama bin Laden's ideology. Even more worryingly, during the same time period, right-wing and left-wing extremist groups and individuals have been far more likely to acquire toxins and to assemble the makings of radiological weapons than al Qaeda sympathizers

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10 of the Worst Terror Attacks by Extreme Christians and Far-Right White Men

http://www.alternet.org/tea-party-and-right/10-worst-terror-attacks-extreme-christians-and-far-right-white-men?page=0%2C2

 

 

Most of the terrorist activity in the U.S. in recent years has not come from Muslims, but from radical Christianists, white supremacists and far-right militia groups.
whitemaleterror.jpg
July 24, 2013 |
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From Fox News to the Weekly Standard, neoconservatives have tried to paint terrorism as a largely or exclusively Islamic phenomenon. Their message of Islamophobia has been repeated many times since the George W. Bush era: Islam is inherently violent, Christianity is inherently peaceful, and there is no such thing as a Christian terrorist or a white male terrorist. But the facts don’t bear that out. Far-right white male radicals and extreme Christianists are every bit as capable of acts of terrorism as radical Islamists, and to pretend that such terrorists don’t exist does the public a huge disservice. Dzhokhar Anzorovich Tsarnaev and the late Tamerlan Anzorovich Tsarnaev (the Chechen brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombing of April 15, 2013) are both considered white and appear to have been motivated in part by radical Islam. And many terrorist attacks in the United States have been carried out by people who were neither Muslims nor dark-skinned.

 

When white males of the far right carry out violent attacks, neocons and Republicans typically describe them as lone-wolf extremists rather than people who are part of terrorist networks or well-organized terrorist movements. Yet many of the terrorist attacks in the United States have been carried out by people who had long histories of networking with other terrorists. In fact, most of the terrorist activity occurring in the United States in recent years has not come from Muslims, but from a combination of radical Christianists, white supremacists and far-right militia groups.

Below are 10 of the worst examples of non-Islamic terrorism that have occurred in the United States in the last 30 years.

1. Wisconsin Sikh Temple massacre, Aug. 5, 2012. The virulent, neocon-fueled Islamophobia that has plagued post-9/11 America has not only posed a threat to Muslims, it has had deadly consequences for people of other faiths, including Sikhs. Sikhs are not Muslims; the traditional Sikh attire, including their turbans, is different from traditional Sunni, Shiite or Sufi attire. But to a racist, a bearded Sikh looks like a Muslim. Only four days after 9/11, Balbir Singh Sodhi, a Sikh immigrant from India who owned a gas station in Mesa, Arizona, was murdered by Frank Silva Roque, a racist who obviously mistook him for a Muslim.

But Sodhi’s murder was not the last example of anti-Sikh violence in post-9/11 America. On Aug. 5, 2012, white supremacist Wade Michael Page used a semiautomatic weapon to murder six people during an attack on a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. Page’s connection to the white supremacist movement was well-documented: he had been a member of the neo-Nazi rock bands End Empathy and Definite Hate. Attorney General Eric Holder described the attack as “an act of terrorism, an act of hatred.” It was good to see the nation’s top cop acknowledge that terrorist acts can, in fact, involve white males murdering people of color.

 

2. The murder of Dr. George Tiller, May 31, 2009. Imagine that a physician had been the victim of an attempted assassination by an Islamic jihadist in 1993, and received numerous death threats from al-Qaeda after that, before being murdered by an al-Qaeda member. Neocons, Fox News and the Christian Right would have had a field day. A physician was the victim of a terrorist killing that day, but neither the terrorist nor the people who inflamed the terrorist were Muslims. Dr. George Tiller, who was shot and killed by anti-abortion terrorist Scott Roeder on May 31, 2009, was a victim of Christian Right terrorism, not al-Qaeda.

Tiller had a long history of being targeted for violence by Christian Right terrorists. In 1986, his clinic was firebombed. Then, in 1993, Tiller was shot five times by female Christian Right terrorist Shelly Shannon (now serving time in a federal prison) but survived that attack. Given that Tiller had been the victim of an attempted murder and received countless death threats after that, Fox News would have done well to avoid fanning the flames of unrest. Instead, Bill O’Reilly repeatedly referred to him as “Tiller the baby killer." When Roeder murdered Tiller, O’Reilly condemned the attack but did so in a way that was lukewarm at best.

 

Keith Olbermann called O’Reilly out and denounced him as a “facilitator for domestic terrorism” and a “blindly irresponsible man.” And Crazy for God author Frank Schaffer, who was formerly a figure on the Christian Right but has since become critical of that movement, asserted that the Christian Right’s extreme anti-abortion rhetoric “helped create the climate that made this murder likely to happen.” Neocon Ann Coulter, meanwhile, viewed Tiller’s murder as a source of comic relief, telling O’Reilly, “ I don't really like to think of it as a murder. It was terminating Tiller in the 203rd trimester.” The Republican/neocon double standard when it comes to terrorism is obvious. At Fox News and AM neocon talk radio, Islamic terrorism is a source of nonstop fear-mongering, while Christian Right terrorism gets a pass.

 

3. Knoxville Unitarian Universalist Church shooting, July 27, 2008. On July 27, 2008, Christian Right sympathizer Jim David Adkisson walked into the Knoxville Unitarian Universalist Church in Knoxville, Tennessee during a children’s play and began shooting people at random. Two were killed, while seven others were injured but survived. Adkisson said he was motivated by a hatred of liberals, Democrats and gays, and he considered neocon Bernard Goldberg’s book, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America, his political manifesto. Adkisson (who pleaded guilty to two counts of first-degree murder and is now serving life in prison without parole) was vehemently anti-abortion, but apparently committing an act of terrorism during a children’s play was good ol’ Republican family values. While Adkisson’s act of terrorism was reported on Fox News, it didn't get the round-the-clock coverage an act of Islamic terrorism would have garnered.

 

4. The murder of Dr. John Britton, July 29, 1994. To hear the Christian Right tell it, there is no such thing as Christian terrorism. Tell that to the victims of the Army of God, a loose network of radical Christianists with a long history of terrorist attacks on abortion providers. One Christian Right terrorist with ties to the Army of God was Paul Jennings Hill, who was executed by lethal injection on Sept. 3, 2003 for the murders of abortion doctor John Britton and his bodyguard James Barrett. Hill shot both of them in cold blood and expressed no remorse whatsoever; he insisted he was doing’s God’s work and has been exalted as a martyr by the Army of God.

 

5. The Centennial Olympic Park bombing, July 27, 1996. Paul Jennings Hill is hardly the only Christian terrorist who has been praised by the Army of God; that organization has also praised Eric Rudolph, who is serving life without parole for a long list of terrorist attacks committed in the name of Christianity. Rudolph is best known for carrying out the Olympic Park bombing in Atlanta during the 1996 Summer Olympics—a blast that killed spectator Alice Hawthorne and wounded 111 others. Hawthorne wasn’t the only person Rudolph murdered: his bombing of an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Alabama in 1998 caused the death of Robert Sanderson (a Birmingham police officer and part-time security guard) and caused nurse Emily Lyons to lose an eye.

Rudolph’s other acts of Christian terrorism include bombing the Otherwise Lounge (a lesbian bar in Atlanta) in 1997 and an abortion clinic in an Atlanta suburb in 1997. Rudolph was no lone wolf: he was part of a terrorist movement that encouraged his violence. And the Army of God continues to exalt Rudolph as a brave Christian who is doing God’s work.

 

6. The murder of Barnett Slepian by James Charles Kopp, Oct. 23, 1998. Like Paul Jennings Hill, Eric Rudolph and Scott Roeder, James Charles Kopp is a radical Christian terrorist who has been exalted as a hero by the Army of God. On Oct. 23, 1998 Kopp fired a single shot into the Amherst, NY home of Barnett Slepian (a doctor who performed abortions), mortally wounding him. Slepian died an hour later. Kopp later claimed he only meant to wound Slepian, not kill him. But Judge Michael D'Amico of Erin County, NY said that the killing was clearly premeditated and sentenced Kopp to 25 years to life. Kopp is a suspect in other anti-abortion terrorist attacks, including the non-fatal shootings of three doctors in Canada, though it appears unlikely that Kopp will be extradited to Canada to face any charges.

 

7. Planned Parenthood bombing, Brookline, Massachusetts, 1994. Seldom has the term “Christian terrorist” been used in connection with John C. Salvi on AM talk radio or at Fox News, but it’s a term that easily applies to him. In 1994, the radical anti-abortionist and Army of God member attacked a Planned Parenthood clinic in Brookline, Massachusetts, shooting and killing receptionists Shannon Lowney and Lee Ann Nichols and wounding several others. Salvi was found dead in his prison cell in 1996, and his death was ruled a suicide. The Army of God has exalted Salvi as a Christian martyr and described Lowney and Nichols not as victims of domestic terrorism, but as infidels who got what they deserved. The Rev. Donald Spitz, a Christianist and Army of God supporter who is so extreme that even the radical anti-abortion group Operation Rescue disassociated itself from him, has praised Salvi as well.

8. Suicide attack on IRS building in Austin, Texas, Feb. 18, 2010. When Joseph Stack flew a plane into the Echelon office complex (where an IRS office was located), Fox News’ coverage of the incident was calm and matter-of-fact. Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa seemed to find the attack amusing and joked that it could have been avoided if the federal government had followed his advice and abolished the IRS. Nonetheless, there were two fatalities: Stack and IRS employee Vernon Hunter. Stack left behind a rambling suicide note outlining his reasons for the attack, which included a disdain for the IRS as well as total disgust with health insurance companies and bank bailouts. Some of the most insightful coverage of the incident came from Noam Chomsky, who said that while Stack had some legitimate grievances—millions of Americans shared his outrage over bank bailouts and the practices of health insurance companies—the way he expressed them was absolutely wrong.

 

9. The murder of Alan Berg, June 18, 1984. One of the most absurd claims some Republicans have made about white supremacists is that they are liberals and progressives. That claim is especially ludicrous in light of the terrorist killing of liberal Denver-based talk show host Alan Berg, a critic of white supremacists who was killed with an automatic weapon on June 18, 1984. The killing was linked to members of the Order, a white supremacist group that had marked Berg for death. Order members David Lane (a former Ku Klux Klan member who had also been active in the Aryan Nations) and Bruce Pierce were both convicted in federal court on charges of racketeering, conspiracy and violating Berg’s civil rights and given what amounted to life sentences.

Robert Matthews, who founded the Order, got that name from a fictional group in white supremacist William Luther Pierce’s anti-Semitic 1978 novel, The Turner Diaries—a book Timothy McVeigh was quite fond of. The novel’s fictional account of the destruction of a government building has been described as the inspiration for the Oklahoma City bombing of 1995.

 

10. Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City bombing, April 19, 1995. Neocons and Republicans grow angry and uncomfortable whenever Timothy McVeigh is cited as an example of a non-Islamic terrorist. Pointing out that a non-Muslim white male carried out an attack as vicious and deadly as the Oklahoma City bombing doesn’t fit into their narrative that only Muslims and people of color are capable of carrying out terrorist attacks. Neocons will claim that bringing up McVeigh’s name during a discussion of terrorism is a “red herring” that distracts us from fighting radical Islamists, but that downplays the cruel, destructive nature of the attack.

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Got some more for you, Jim:

 

http://archive.adl.org/hate-patrol/churchmovement.asp

 

 

Identity Church Movement spacer_tr.gifspacer_tr.gif

Identity churches use Christianity to justify racism and anti-Semitism; they became widely-known as a violence-prone movement in the United States in the late 1970's and early 1980's. Identity followers believe that white Anglo-Saxons - not Jews - are the real Biblical "Chosen People;" that Jews are descendants of a sexual union between Eve and Satan; that the white race is superior to others, and that Blacks and other nonwhite races are "mud people" on the same level as animals, and therefore have no souls.

seedline.gif--The Basic Identity Belief:
The Jew as the devil who tricked Eve
in the Garden of Eden.

The Identity Church movement promotes
the view that Christianity, when properly understood, supports anti-Semitic and racist beliefs and extremist violence.
In actuality, of course, the Identity version of Christianity completely distorts traditional Christian teachings. In 1987, the National Council of Churches, the leading organization representing mainline Christians, forcefully rejected all of the Identity movement's teachings.

Identity has its roots in a belief called Anglo-Israelism, which arose in England in the late 1800s. Anglo-Israelites believed that white Anglo-Saxons were descended from the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel, who were exiled by invaders in biblical times. According to Anglo-Israel doctrine, England and the United States were the true Israel of the Bible - the lands in which biblical promises to the "Chosen People," Anglo-Saxons, were to be fulfilled.

Identity leaders hope that if hate and bigotry are presented as religion more people will listen and accept at least some of these beliefs. In the United States Identity groups have even tried to convince the government that they are actually "churches," and therefore deserve the tax benefits and respectability that true religious organizations receive.

Any examination of the activities of Identity Church followers would quickly reveal their true nature. In 1983 and 1984 members of a group called The Order committed a series of violent crimes, including murder, bombing, and armed robbery in support of their extremist views. This group closely followed Identity teachings and attended Identity churches (most of which celebrate Hitler as a prophet or even messiah). According to the testimony of one member of the group, "the end goal, bluntly, was the annihilation of the Jewish race."

Most recently, the Identity movement's bitter racist ideology and anti-Semitic philosophy has linked together an assorted collection of extremist groups. Organizations ranging from the neo-Nazi National Alliance to some militia groups have embraced Christian Identity beliefs. These racists have all found the Identity Church's views helpful in promoting and defending their violent and hateful ideas and actions.

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Non-Muslims Carried Out More than 90% of All Terrorist Attacks on U.S. Soil

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/05/muslims-only-carried-out-2-5-percent-of-terrorist-attacks-on-u-s-soil-between-1970-and-2012.html

Posted on May 1, 2013

U.S. News and World Report noted in February of this year:

Of the more than 300 American deaths from political violence and mass shootings since 9/11, only 33 have come at the hands of Muslim-Americans, according to the
. The Muslim-American suspects or perpetrators in these or other attempted attacks fit no demographic profile—only 51 of more than 200 are of Arabic ethnicity. In 2012, all but one of the nine Muslim-American terrorism plots uncovered were halted in early stages. That one, an attempted bombing of a Social Security office in Arizona, caused no casualties.

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What gives Pat Boone any more credibility than the man in the moon? He had a top ten hit back in the early 60's and was in a couple teen movies and performed in Vegas.

 

Crap Wayne Newton does that.

Oh, he was a star performer and that makes him a point of light in the darkness of educated doubt real genders don't count aNnd character matters philosophically at least.

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Maybe you would like to explain why anyone would give a f--k what some jack leg off the street like Boone would have to say. I imagine pretty much all the fake Christians say similar things, It's in their contract with the radical rep party. Just doing what they were paid to do. Even if he had nothing but good to say about Obama, I still don't think I could find what he had to say important at all. I can see how it would thrill a dude like you that is continuously looking for a large pile of horse s--t, and feels really lucky when he is waist deep in it.

Maybe you would like to explain why anyone would give a fuck what some jack leg like yourself has to say?

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I am not concerned with fake Christians. I have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. To me, fake Christians are foul creatures; as are devout Muslims.

To liberals, all Christians are fake. It is their way to dismiss them and further hate us. I'm coolio with that. LOL!

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