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Here is where thousands of jobs are going to go. Shouldn't businesses that use robots be taxed to cover unemployed workers? In this case, 1 machine replaces 20 workers. 20 workers on unemployment and food stamps, etc. The farmers will benefit directly by eliminating the wages & benefits of 20 workers for every machine.

 

SALINAS, Calif. (AP) - On a windy morning in California's Salinas Valley, a tractor pulled a wheeled, metal contraption over rows of budding iceberg lettuce plants. Engineers from Silicon Valley tinkered with the software on a laptop to ensure the machine was eliminating the right leafy buds.

 

The engineers were testing the Lettuce Bot, a machine that can "thin" a field of lettuce in the time it takes about 20 workers to do the job by hand.

 

The thinner is part of a new generation of machines that target the last frontier of agricultural mechanization - fruits and vegetables destined for the fresh market, not processing, which have thus far resisted mechanization because they're sensitive to bruising.

 

Researchers are now designing robots for these most delicate crops by integrating advanced sensors, powerful computing, electronics, computer vision, robotic hardware and algorithms, as well as networking and high precision GPS localization technologies. Most ag robots won't be commercially available for at least a few years.

 

Farmers say farm robots could provide relief from recent labor shortages, lessen the unknowns of immigration reform, even reduce costs, increase quality and yield a more consistent product.

 

"There aren't enough workers to take the available jobs, so the robots can come and alleviate some of that problem," said Ron Yokota, a farming operations manager at Tanimura & Antle, the Salinas-based fresh produce company that owns the field where the Lettuce Bot was being tested.

 

Many sectors in U.S. agriculture have relied on machines for decades and even the harvesting of fruits and vegetables meant for processing has slowly been mechanized. But nationwide, the vast majority of fresh-market fruit is still harvested by hand.

 

Research into fresh produce mechanization was dormant for years because of an over-abundance of workers and pressures from farmworker labor unions.


In recent years, as the labor supply has tightened and competition from abroad has increased, growers have sought out machines to reduce labor costs and supplement the nation's unstable agricultural workforce. The federal government, venture capital companies and commodity boards have stepped up with funding.

 

http://apnews.myway.com//article/20130715/DA7HR7B80.html

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This is where the dive to find cheaper everything is going to bite us in the ass.

 

Also people being to comfortable doing nothing to get up and do some of these jobs has caused business to have to adapt.

 

Even the oil field is losing jobs to robotic drilling rigs.

 

I don't know what the solution to this mess is, but what I'm doing is starting an organic farm out in the country so I wont be as subject to the collapse of the system when it happens.

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Here is where thousands of jobs are going to go. Shouldn't businesses that use robots be taxed to cover unemployed workers? In this case, 1 machine replaces 20 workers. 20 workers on unemployment and food stamps, etc. The farmers will benefit directly by eliminating the wages & benefits of 20 workers for every machine.

My only question is "Why do progressives hate progress"?

Cars put the buggy whip manufacturers and all their employees out of work.

The loom put weavers out of work.

Why do you want the U.S. to live in the stone age?

 

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Here is where thousands of jobs are going to go. Shouldn't businesses that use robots be taxed to cover unemployed workers? In this case, 1 machine replaces 20 workers. 20 workers on unemployment and food stamps, etc. The farmers will benefit directly by eliminating the wages & benefits of 20 workers for every machine.

 

SALINAS, Calif. (AP) - On a windy morning in California's Salinas Valley, a tractor pulled a wheeled, metal contraption over rows of budding iceberg lettuce plants. Engineers from Silicon Valley tinkered with the software on a laptop to ensure the machine was eliminating the right leafy buds.

 

The engineers were testing the Lettuce Bot, a machine that can "thin" a field of lettuce in the time it takes about 20 workers to do the job by hand.

 

The thinner is part of a new generation of machines that target the last frontier of agricultural mechanization - fruits and vegetables destined for the fresh market, not processing, which have thus far resisted mechanization because they're sensitive to bruising.

 

Researchers are now designing robots for these most delicate crops by integrating advanced sensors, powerful computing, electronics, computer vision, robotic hardware and algorithms, as well as networking and high precision GPS localization technologies. Most ag robots won't be commercially available for at least a few years.

 

Farmers say farm robots could provide relief from recent labor shortages, lessen the unknowns of immigration reform, even reduce costs, increase quality and yield a more consistent product.

 

"There aren't enough workers to take the available jobs, so the robots can come and alleviate some of that problem," said Ron Yokota, a farming operations manager at Tanimura & Antle, the Salinas-based fresh produce company that owns the field where the Lettuce Bot was being tested.

 

Many sectors in U.S. agriculture have relied on machines for decades and even the harvesting of fruits and vegetables meant for processing has slowly been mechanized. But nationwide, the vast majority of fresh-market fruit is still harvested by hand.

 

Research into fresh produce mechanization was dormant for years because of an over-abundance of workers and pressures from farmworker labor unions.

 

In recent years, as the labor supply has tightened and competition from abroad has increased, growers have sought out machines to reduce labor costs and supplement the nation's unstable agricultural workforce. The federal government, venture capital companies and commodity boards have stepped up with funding.

 

http://apnews.myway.com//article/20130715/DA7HR7B80.html

 

Actually..... this allows us to utilize those resources in another fashion you DUMBASS. If the ONLY job you're capable of is picking lettuce???? Society ain't going to be able to save you anyway retard.

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Actually..... this allows us to utilize those resources in another fashion you DUMBASS. If the ONLY job you're capable of is picking lettuce???? Society ain't going to be able to save you anyway retard.

 

 

But you see, there are already to few jobs for people to do. So what are the people with no job supposed to do?

 

Sit on their asses and collect welfare I suppose is the answer.

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But you see, there are already to few jobs for people to do. So what are the people with no job supposed to do?

 

Sit on their asses and collect welfare I suppose is the answer.

 

Do what I did when I got laid off. I went and got a degree in an in demand job field and was hired before I graduated......

 

We'll NEVER be short on lettuce pickers or fast food workers....... DUH.

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shin you are a lib or a "progressive". robotics is progress. robots don't need benefits, cost more for over time, call in sick, complain about their job and they do the job far better then the humans they replaced. Americans should concentrate on higher education because these manual labor jobs will be outsourced or done by robots or cheap illegal immigrant labor.

 

and of course not. that is my answer to your stupid question about companies paying higher taxes to cover the higher unemployment due to technology. if anything the people who lose these manual labor jobs should not get any unemployment because what few skills they have made them obsolete and worthless

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Here is where thousands of jobs are going to go. Shouldn't businesses that use robots be taxed to cover unemployed workers? In this case, 1 machine replaces 20 workers. 20 workers on unemployment and food stamps, etc. The farmers will benefit directly by eliminating the wages & benefits of 20 workers for every machine.

 

SALINAS, Calif. (AP) - On a windy morning in California's Salinas Valley, a tractor pulled a wheeled, metal contraption over rows of budding iceberg lettuce plants. Engineers from Silicon Valley tinkered with the software on a laptop to ensure the machine was eliminating the right leafy buds.

 

The engineers were testing the Lettuce Bot, a machine that can "thin" a field of lettuce in the time it takes about 20 workers to do the job by hand.

 

The thinner is part of a new generation of machines that target the last frontier of agricultural mechanization - fruits and vegetables destined for the fresh market, not processing, which have thus far resisted mechanization because they're sensitive to bruising.

 

Researchers are now designing robots for these most delicate crops by integrating advanced sensors, powerful computing, electronics, computer vision, robotic hardware and algorithms, as well as networking and high precision GPS localization technologies. Most ag robots won't be commercially available for at least a few years.

 

Farmers say farm robots could provide relief from recent labor shortages, lessen the unknowns of immigration reform, even reduce costs, increase quality and yield a more consistent product.

 

"There aren't enough workers to take the available jobs, so the robots can come and alleviate some of that problem," said Ron Yokota, a farming operations manager at Tanimura & Antle, the Salinas-based fresh produce company that owns the field where the Lettuce Bot was being tested.

 

Many sectors in U.S. agriculture have relied on machines for decades and even the harvesting of fruits and vegetables meant for processing has slowly been mechanized. But nationwide, the vast majority of fresh-market fruit is still harvested by hand.

 

Research into fresh produce mechanization was dormant for years because of an over-abundance of workers and pressures from farmworker labor unions.

 

In recent years, as the labor supply has tightened and competition from abroad has increased, growers have sought out machines to reduce labor costs and supplement the nation's unstable agricultural workforce. The federal government, venture capital companies and commodity boards have stepped up with funding.

 

http://apnews.myway.com//article/20130715/DA7HR7B80.html

hey you commie f@ggot...hows things? did you get that anal wart thingy cleared up?

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No, they should not be taxed. It's called "Creative Destruction" and it is crucial to the progress of a free and civil society.

 

Should the government tax flat screen tv repair companies to pay for the former employees of tube tv repair companies?

 

There will always be a need for labor, skilled and unskilled.

 

As robots replace laborers, more mechanics, programmers, maintenance workers, etc will be hired to facilitate the technology... Aren't these higher paying jobs what we are looking for?

 

The last part is not necessarily true. As machines improve and the ability to repair, produce and operate is improved there is most likely going to be a loss of need for labor.

 

As it is, one farmer can do the job of thousands. The equipment they use lasts longer than ever. The technology to diagnose and repair is more advanced. The ability to operate and track everything by computer.

Not to mention the output of farms is greatly enhanced.

 

Software and engineering only has to be done once, not every day.

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No, they should not be taxed. It's called "Creative Destruction" and it is crucial to the progress of a free and civil society.

 

Should the government tax flat screen tv repair companies to pay for the former employees of tube tv repair companies?

 

There will always be a need for labor, skilled and unskilled.

 

As robots replace laborers, more mechanics, programmers, maintenance workers, etc will be hired to facilitate the technology... Aren't these higher paying jobs what we are looking for?

 

There will not always be a need for labor. AI is reaching the point where machines can build, troubleshoot, maintain and repair other machines, and employment will be a thing of the past. Human labor will be obsolete.

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My only question is "Why do progressives hate progress"?

Cars put the buggy whip manufacturers and all their employees out of work.

The loom put weavers out of work.

Why do you want the U.S. to live in the stone age?

Why do cons always use the word "HATE" ? Who the fk said progs hate progess?? That mind of yours is fking on warp-drive dude. Progess requires change, and change in this case might be taxing businesses that exchange labor for machines. See thar, no hate, just fking logic. Machines do it better, but who is going to pay the price for this nonhuman adaption?

 

Why do you want the US to live in the stone age is the fking question dude. You want to burn oil like the ancients did in an oil lamp, WHEN there are plenty of alternatives to the problem. You fight progress tooth & nail, so please stop with the con BS, we have heard it all before!!

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For those who are born with some defect, such as Down' syndrome, Willi Prader, mild retardation, etc...

 

What will become of them?

 

With no useful function in society for those who are not capable of computer programming or other such endeavors, should we let them slowly die of exposure and starvation, or quickly and mercifully execute them, thereby at least saving their dignity?

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Software and engineering NEVER stop. It is to the benefit of the company that it continues to improve its product so it doesn't get left behind by competitors.

 

You still need to fix the equipment, you still need to maintain it(change the oil, wash the windows, clean the blades,etc,etc,etc), you still need to ship it and its parts, you still need someone to diagnose(even if the machine can self diagnose, it is impossible to programatically catch EVERY possible mechanical exception)

 

 

Actually most of the maintenance is done by the farmer. What else are they going to do? How advanced do you thing the software and equipment will have to advance past driving itself by GPS, tracking previous year crop production, weed growth and fertilizer needs?

 

It's not like cars where people buy new ones even when they don't need them...or computers etc.

 

Also how many engineers and programmers are going to be needed?

 

Eventually that market would be inundated too. I guarantee we have more people than there will be a need for engineers.

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For those who are born with some defect, such as Down' syndrome, Willi Prader, mild retardation, etc...

 

What will become of them?

 

With no useful function in society for those who are not capable of computer programming or other such endeavors, should we let them slowly die of exposure and starvation, or quickly and mercifully execute them, thereby at least saving their dignity?

We could bring back freak shows at county and state fairs. Those retards and deformed crippleds used to make a pretty good living before political correctness ruined their careers

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