Jump to content

why is obama building coal fired power plants in Africa?


Recommended Posts

Could be the cheapest way to get the job done while pocketing half the money promised and not spent in Africa. Africa may have a coal supply and that would get that continent becoming modernized as a whole.

 

So many things are possible, good and bad.

 

Hope for the best, be prepared for the worst, and survive now because tomorrow only exists as an accepted hypothetical..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

US PRESIDENT Barack Obamas $7bn plan to shine "light where currently theres darkness" in Africa by doubling access to power on the worlds poorest continent was billed as a highlight of his African tour.

 

He announced the Power Africa initiative in Cape Town on Sunday in a speech in which he also urged the fast-growing but still troubled region to follow the shining example of anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela.

 

But Mr Obamas proposal, which aims to partner US government financing with private sector investment, may look low-wattage compared with Chinas already ongoing big electricity projects on the worlds least developed and least lit continent.

 

Beijing has been lighting the way in Africa with billions of dollars of promised power investment and projects. As with other infrastructure development opportunities in Africa, Washington seems to be arriving late to the party.

 

Visiting Africa in March, Chinese President Xi Jinping renewed an offer of $20bn in loans to "help African countries turn resource endowment into development strength".

 

A major chunk of this Chinese money is aimed at connecting African economies with electricity, from Zambia to Ethiopia.

 

"The major thrust of the Chinese infrastructure spend in Africa has been in the power sector. It is tens of billions of dollars," said Frontier Advisory CE Martyn Davies.

 

The Asian giant has a huge appetite for African resources from copper to oil and they cannot be extracted without power.

 

Chinas Sichuan Hongda signed a $3bn deal with Tanzania in 2011 to mine coal and iron ore and build a 600MW coal-fired power plant in the countrys south.

 

The centrepiece of an array of Chinese power projects in Ethiopia is the $4.1bn Grand Renaissance Dam.

 

Not just a mine, but a market

 

Satellite imagery of Africa at night shows a mostly dark continent, the main exceptions being the regions dominant economy South Africa, the more developed North African Mediterranean coast, and scattered pinpricks of light in the oil-producing Gulf of Guinea, which includes Nigeria.

 

More than a century after the invention of the light bulb, the World Bank says only one in four people have access to electricity in sub-Saharan Africa.

 

According to the International Energy Agency, the region will require more than $300bn in investment to achieve universal electricity access by 2030.

 

In terms of numbers of projects and investment pledges, China seems well ahead of America at the moment in the race to add more bright spots to Africas nocturnal gloom. Some Chinese projects, for example a hydro-power project in Ghana that started producing 130MW a month ago, have already come on line.

 

Power plants cannot be built overnight and it may take years for similar US initiatives in Africa to be up and running.

 

This may put America at a disadvantage to China in the scramble for African resources.

 

But Mr Obama clearly hinted American investment may be better for Africa than Chinese investment in creating industries and jobs on the continent not just sucking our resources with more of a focus on a potential consumers market.

 

"Our primary interest when it comes to working with Africa on energy issues has to do with how do we power Africa so that it can be an effective market creating jobs and opportunity," Mr Obama told a news conference in South Africa on Saturday.

 

"We also then have somebody to trade with and sell iPods to, and airplanes, and all kinds of good stuff," he added.

 

"Obama seemed to be taking more of a Brazilian approach to Africa. A lot of Brazilian policy is looking at what Brazil can sell to the African market," said UK-based Chatham House Africa programme head Alex Vines.

 

Emphasising rising oil, natural gas and clean energy production in the US, Mr Obama told his South African audience: "Frankly, we dont need energy from Africa".

 

Oil exports from Africas top producer, Nigeria, to the US have fallen from more than a million barrels per day (bpd) in 2010 to 383,000 now, the US Energy Information Agency says.

 

Angolas US exports in the same period dropped to 172,000 bpd from 393,000 as the domestic US shale gas boom has taken off.

 

The more the merrier

 

While he made a point of saying he did not view Beijings trade and investment surge as a threat to US interests "the more the merrier" was his take on foreign economic involvement in Africa Mr Obama could not resist a veiled mild jibe at the way Chinese companies conduct their businesses there.

 

"If somebody says they want to come build something here, are they hiring African workers? If somebody says that they want to help you develop your natural resources, how much of the money is staying in Africa?" Mr Obama said.

 

This echoed complaints from some government and business circles in Africa that Chinese companies often bring in their own workforces to develop resource-related infrastructure projects, creating few new jobs, let alone value-adding processing or manufacturing industries.

 

The US initiative, called Power Africa, will see Washington commit more than $7bn over the next five years with the stated goal to "double access to power in sub-Saharan Africa," according to the White House. This includes up to $5bn being made available by the US Export-Import Bank.

 

More than $9bn in US private sector investments have also been committed to support development of more than 8,000 MW.

 

But not everyone was happy. Outspoken American real estate mogul Donald Trump called Mr Obamas Power Africa plan "crazy".

 

"Every penny of the $7bn going to Africa as per Obama will be stolen corruption is rampant! ... We should be concerned about the American worker & invest here," Trump tweeted on his @realDonaldTrump Twitter Account.

http://www.bdlive.co.za/africa/africanbusiness/2013/07/02/can-obamas-power-africa-plan-hold-a-candle-to-chinas-investment

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty sure that starting a thread is YOU seeking attention, fruitcake. Failing to link your claims is - well, it's just you being the weak twerp that you are, son.

It is not my fault that you are hopelessly uninformed. So typical of todays left-nut retards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So barry continues his bigoted assault on white legal citizens by shutting down West Virginia's coal industry and giving our money to black Africans to start their own coal industry. How has he not been impeached or assassinated by now is a mystery.

Pretty much. All the while spouting his global warming nonsense..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought he was trying to prevent global warming. So he invests 7 Billion of our countries money in Africa, while proclaiming global warming, and shutting Americas down!

I thought he was trying to prevent global warming. So he invests 7 Billion of our countries money in Africa, while proclaiming global warming, and shutting Americas down!

 

World's 6th largest producer of coal. They use coal to make oil and fuels. 7 B huh? LMAO!!

 

To date,the United States has provided Israel $118 billion (current, or non-inflation-adjusted, dollars) in bilateral assistance. For FY2014, the Administration is requesting $3.1 billion in FMF to Israel and $15 million in Migration and Refugee Assistance. The Missile Defense Agency’s FY2014 request for Israeli Cooperative Programs is $95.782 million, including $52.607 million for Arrow III, $32.512 million for David’s Sling, and $10.663 million for Arrow II. The Department of Defense also is requesting $220 million in FY2014 Procurement, Defense-wide funds for Iron Dome.

 

Africa is 11,608,000 Sq. miles with 1 billion humans.

Israel is.........10,425 Sq miles with 7.8 million humans.

What seems to be your problem? Oh, the black problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is not my fault that you are hopelessly uninformed. So typical of todays left-nut retards.

 

You're not keeping up. Pew Research, which even righties respect, found a good bit ago that Fox viewers are the least-informed Americans, while watchers of NPR are the most-informed. But, of course, Fox viewers smugly believe they are getting the real deal. Sigh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

You're not keeping up. Pew Research, which even righties respect, found a good bit ago that Fox viewers are the least-informed Americans, while watchers of NPR are the most-informed. But, of course, Fox viewers smugly believe they are getting the real deal. Sigh.

I could care less what your skewed polls say.... :rolleyes:

 

I know what I see on these forums, and lefty blogs on a daily basis.

 

I don't need a poll to tell me what to think, or what I see with my own eyes..

 

I thought he was trying to prevent global warming. So he invests 7 Billion of our countries money in Africa, while proclaiming global warming, and shutting Americas down!

 

World's 6th largest producer of coal. They use coal to make oil and fuels. 7 B huh? LMAO!!

 

To date,the United States has provided Israel $118 billion (current, or non-inflation-adjusted, dollars) in bilateral assistance. For FY2014, the Administration is requesting $3.1 billion in FMF to Israel and $15 million in Migration and Refugee Assistance. The Missile Defense Agencys FY2014 request for Israeli Cooperative Programs is $95.782 million, including $52.607 million for Arrow III, $32.512 million for Davids Sling, and $10.663 million for Arrow II. The Department of Defense also is requesting $220 million in FY2014 Procurement, Defense-wide funds for Iron Dome.

 

Africa is 11,608,000 Sq. miles with 1 billion humans.

Israel is.........10,425 Sq miles with 7.8 million humans.

What seems to be your problem? Oh, the black problem.

Yeah. It's all because of his color in the land of lefty delusional lala land. Damn the facts that say he has a war on coal in America, because of his global warming fallacy. All the while investing billions in coal fired power plants in Africa..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

More than $9bn in US private sector investments have also been committed to support development of more than 8,000 MW.

 

But not everyone was happy. Outspoken American real estate mogul Donald Trump called Mr Obamas Power Africa plan "crazy".

 

"Every penny of the $7bn going to Africa as per Obama will be stolen corruption is rampant! ... We should be concerned about the American worker & invest here," Trump tweeted

 

 

Trump is not the brightest bulb in the basket. First, China is invested there, so where is the corruption? Second, we did invest in America, it failed due to corruption.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

US PRESIDENT Barack Obamas $7bn plan to shine "light where currently theres darkness" in Africa by doubling access to power on the worlds poorest continent was billed as a highlight of his African tour.

 

He announced the Power Africa initiative in Cape Town on Sunday in a speech in which he also urged the fast-growing but still troubled region to follow the shining example of anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela.

 

But Mr Obamas proposal, which aims to partner US government financing with private sector investment, may look low-wattage compared with Chinas already ongoing big electricity projects on the worlds least developed and least lit continent.

 

Beijing has been lighting the way in Africa with billions of dollars of promised power investment and projects. As with other infrastructure development opportunities in Africa, Washington seems to be arriving late to the party.

 

Visiting Africa in March, Chinese President Xi Jinping renewed an offer of $20bn in loans to "help African countries turn resource endowment into development strength".

 

A major chunk of this Chinese money is aimed at connecting African economies with electricity, from Zambia to Ethiopia.

 

"The major thrust of the Chinese infrastructure spend in Africa has been in the power sector. It is tens of billions of dollars," said Frontier Advisory CE Martyn Davies.

 

The Asian giant has a huge appetite for African resources from copper to oil and they cannot be extracted without power.

 

Chinas Sichuan Hongda signed a $3bn deal with Tanzania in 2011 to mine coal and iron ore and build a 600MW coal-fired power plant in the countrys south.

 

The centrepiece of an array of Chinese power projects in Ethiopia is the $4.1bn Grand Renaissance Dam.

 

Not just a mine, but a market

 

Satellite imagery of Africa at night shows a mostly dark continent, the main exceptions being the regions dominant economy South Africa, the more developed North African Mediterranean coast, and scattered pinpricks of light in the oil-producing Gulf of Guinea, which includes Nigeria.

 

More than a century after the invention of the light bulb, the World Bank says only one in four people have access to electricity in sub-Saharan Africa.

 

According to the International Energy Agency, the region will require more than $300bn in investment to achieve universal electricity access by 2030.

 

In terms of numbers of projects and investment pledges, China seems well ahead of America at the moment in the race to add more bright spots to Africas nocturnal gloom. Some Chinese projects, for example a hydro-power project in Ghana that started producing 130MW a month ago, have already come on line.

 

Power plants cannot be built overnight and it may take years for similar US initiatives in Africa to be up and running.

 

This may put America at a disadvantage to China in the scramble for African resources.

 

But Mr Obama clearly hinted American investment may be better for Africa than Chinese investment in creating industries and jobs on the continent not just sucking our resources with more of a focus on a potential consumers market.

 

"Our primary interest when it comes to working with Africa on energy issues has to do with how do we power Africa so that it can be an effective market creating jobs and opportunity," Mr Obama told a news conference in South Africa on Saturday.

 

"We also then have somebody to trade with and sell iPods to, and airplanes, and all kinds of good stuff," he added.

 

"Obama seemed to be taking more of a Brazilian approach to Africa. A lot of Brazilian policy is looking at what Brazil can sell to the African market," said UK-based Chatham House Africa programme head Alex Vines.

 

Emphasising rising oil, natural gas and clean energy production in the US, Mr Obama told his South African audience: "Frankly, we dont need energy from Africa".

 

Oil exports from Africas top producer, Nigeria, to the US have fallen from more than a million barrels per day (bpd) in 2010 to 383,000 now, the US Energy Information Agency says.

 

Angolas US exports in the same period dropped to 172,000 bpd from 393,000 as the domestic US shale gas boom has taken off.

 

The more the merrier

 

While he made a point of saying he did not view Beijings trade and investment surge as a threat to US interests "the more the merrier" was his take on foreign economic involvement in Africa Mr Obama could not resist a veiled mild jibe at the way Chinese companies conduct their businesses there.

 

"If somebody says they want to come build something here, are they hiring African workers? If somebody says that they want to help you develop your natural resources, how much of the money is staying in Africa?" Mr Obama said.

 

This echoed complaints from some government and business circles in Africa that Chinese companies often bring in their own workforces to develop resource-related infrastructure projects, creating few new jobs, let alone value-adding processing or manufacturing industries.

 

The US initiative, called Power Africa, will see Washington commit more than $7bn over the next five years with the stated goal to "double access to power in sub-Saharan Africa," according to the White House. This includes up to $5bn being made available by the US Export-Import Bank.

 

More than $9bn in US private sector investments have also been committed to support development of more than 8,000 MW.

 

But not everyone was happy. Outspoken American real estate mogul Donald Trump called Mr Obamas Power Africa plan "crazy".

 

"Every penny of the $7bn going to Africa as per Obama will be stolen corruption is rampant! ... We should be concerned about the American worker & invest here," Trump tweeted on his @realDonaldTrump Twitter Account.

http://www.bdlive.co.za/africa/africanbusiness/2013/07/02/can-obamas-power-africa-plan-hold-a-candle-to-chinas-investment

 

 

I'll repeat Cannon's comment. Where's your link?

 

I didn't read one word about coal in this article.

 

So barry continues his bigoted assault on white legal citizens by shutting down West Virginia's coal industry and giving our money to black Africans to start their own coal industry. How has he not been impeached or assassinated by now is a mystery.

You conveniently forget that your butt buddy George W also invested billions of dollars in Africa. More hypocrisy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I could care less what your skewed polls say.... :rolleyes:

 

I know what I see on these forums, and lefty blogs on a daily basis.

 

I don't need a poll to tell me what to think, or what I see with my own eyes..

 

 

Yeah. It's all because of his color in the land of lefty delusional lala land. Damn the facts that say he has a war on coal in America, because of his global warming fallacy. All the while investing billions in coal fired power plants in Africa..

Not sure what our problem has to do with Africa's problem in rightwing fantasyland? We have alternatives, Africa has coal.

 

 

Oh, they have yellow cake uranium, should we build nuclear plants instead?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...