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ObamaCare sticking it to pre-existing condition customers


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A pre-existing condition health insurance program established by Obamacare is already straining its own budget and, to control costs, the administration’s Health and Human Services Department (HHS) has stopped enrolling any new people in the program, according to an audit by the General Accountability Office (GAO).

In addition, to further control spending, HHS has directed the program to shift more of the costs onto the current enrollees, thus raising the out-of-pocket health care expenses for the people with pre-existing conditions.

“Finally, due to growing concerns about the rate of PCIP [Pre-existing Condition Insurance Program] spending, in February 2013, CCIIO [under HHS] suspended PCIP enrollment to ensure the appropriated funding would be sufficient to cover claims for current enrollees through the end of the program,” states the GAO report, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Enrollment and Spending in the Early Retiree Reinsurance and Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan Programs.


I know there are only about 100 supporters of ObamaCare in the country including Obama and a few of his cabinet members, but if you do support ObamaCare you need to go back to high school and take some math classes. Remember folks if you think business as usual heath care is the wrong answer you don't have to support ObamaCare.
I read this and had to post, I have been busy and still am so don't expect a fast reply. I will be back tomorrow or tonight.
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A pre-existing condition health insurance program established by Obamacare is already straining its own budget and, to control costs, the administration’s Health and Human Services Department (HHS) has stopped enrolling any new people in the program, according to an audit by the General Accountability Office (GAO).

In addition, to further control spending, HHS has directed the program to shift more of the costs onto the current enrollees, thus raising the out-of-pocket health care expenses for the people with pre-existing conditions.

“Finally, due to growing concerns about the rate of PCIP [Pre-existing Condition Insurance Program] spending, in February 2013, CCIIO [under HHS] suspended PCIP enrollment to ensure the appropriated funding would be sufficient to cover claims for current enrollees through the end of the program,” states the GAO report, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Enrollment and Spending in the Early Retiree Reinsurance and Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan Programs.

I know there are only about 100 supporters of ObamaCare in the country including Obama and a few of his cabinet members, but if you do support ObamaCare you need to go back to high school and take some math classes. Remember folks if you think business as usual heath care is the wrong answer you don't have to support ObamaCare.
I read this and had to post, I have been busy and still am so don't expect a fast reply. I will be back tomorrow or tonight.

 

christ, it is sticking it to very healthy people more..but what do i know. i've only been a health insurance professional since reagan was prez......but what the fuk do i know compared to the board experts?

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christ, it is sticking it to very healthy people more..but what do i know. i've only been a health insurance professional since reagan was prez......but what the fuk do i know compared to the board experts?

You need to find another business. Obamacare isn't going anywhere, and if and when it's replaced it won't be with what we had before. Single payer is coming like it or not. Health insurance companies are the problem and always have been. It's time to put for profit healthcare out of everybody elses misery, because it is of no help to anyone except those receiving salaries and commissions denying people healthcare in order to receive them. When your job involves denying someone life saving healthcare for profit reasons, you are the fucking problem.

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You need to find another business. Obamacare isn't going anywhere, and if and when it's replaced it won't be with what we had before. Single payer is coming like it or not. Health insurance companies are the problem and always have been. It's time to put for profit healthcare out of everybody elses misery, because it is of no help to anyone except those receiving salaries and commissions denying people healthcare in order to receive them. When your job involves denying someone life saving healthcare for profit reasons, you are the fucking problem.

yes you are so correct. your knowledge of health care and insurance is far more superior to mine. my 30 yr old license and experience dwarfs in comparrison to your superior knowledge...i feel so unworthy to even speak to you.please forgive my ever disturbing your vast superior knowledge over my 3 decades of impotent lies...i was soooo apologize your greatness...i leave bowing to you

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You need to find another business. Obamacare isn't going anywhere, and if and when it's replaced it won't be with what we had before. Single payer is coming like it or not. Health insurance companies are the problem and always have been. It's time to put for profit healthcare out of everybody elses misery, because it is of no help to anyone except those receiving salaries and commissions denying people healthcare in order to receive them. When your job involves denying someone life saving healthcare for profit reasons, you are the fucking problem.

According to Barney Frank Obama Care was designed to kill insurance companies and create the single payer system. He was caught off guard and did not know he was being filmed. If true it means that the Democrats are lying to the people and trying to force them into something that they claimed not to be doing. In other words they LIED to the American people.

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According to Barney Frank Obama Care was designed to kill insurance companies and create the single payer system. He was caught off guard and did not know he was being filmed. If true it means that the Democrats are lying to the people and trying to force them into something that they claimed not to be doing. In other words they LIED to the American people.

Of course. Rule #1: Liberals lie

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According to Barney Frank Obama Care was designed to kill insurance companies and create the single payer system. He was caught off guard and did not know he was being filmed. If true it means that the Democrats are lying to the people and trying to force them into something that they claimed not to be doing. In other words they LIED to the American people.

 

um...duh...democrats are politicians right? Their lips were moving right?

 

Of course. Rule #1: Liberals lie

 

So do conservatives.

Rule #1 - POLITICIANS LIE

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christ, it is sticking it to very healthy people more..but what do i know. i've only been a health insurance professional since reagan was prez......but what the fuk do i know compared to the board experts?

Right??? I am a paramedic and have very little knowledge on the ways insurance companies work, I just treat i don't care how the bill gets paid. Lol....

We are all wrong though! Obama care will some how improve the lives of low income and lower middle class families by making them pay more for insurance....We just don't understand that is our problem...LOL

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You need to find another business. Obamacare isn't going anywhere, and if and when it's replaced it won't be with what we had before. Single payer is coming like it or not. Health insurance companies are the problem and always have been. It's time to put for profit healthcare out of everybody elses misery, because it is of no help to anyone except those receiving salaries and commissions denying people healthcare in order to receive them. When your job involves denying someone life saving healthcare for profit reasons, you are the fucking problem.

Oh I think ObamaCare will last 3-4 years tops unless massive changes are made to the program, it will do more harm then good as is now. Business as usual heath care needs to change you're absolutely right about that. Obama Care is absolutely not the answer though. Insurance companies are part of the problem but the main problem is big drug companies and medical equipment manufactures. Dr's need to continue to be payed very well though, with how expensive med school is, the insane price of malpractice insurance, an insensitive to go threw 8-10 years of schooling, high stress and long hours. I am also going to med school in the fall and I want to make good money..LOL

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Too tall only :33 on range today I was off for some reason

still don't believe you...sorry man, I could be wrong but spidysenses are screaming you are full of it, or you are someone that got a "failure to adapt" discharge.

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Heres your single payer government run healthcare coming to your town soon,,

 

 

Walter Reed Was The Army's Wake-Up Call In 2007

Jeremy Duncan, a wounded Army specialist assigned to Walter Reed's Building 18, peels back the wallpaper in one of its rooms to show mold in January 2007.

Michel Du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Jeremy Duncan, a wounded Army specialist assigned to Walter Reed's Building 18, peels back the wallpaper in one of its rooms to show mold in January 2007.

Michel Du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty

For more than a century, the Walter Reed Army Medical Center was known as the hospital that catered to presidents and generals. President Dwight D. Eisenhower was treated and died there. So, too, did Gens. "Black Jack" Pershing, Douglas MacArthur and George Marshall.

But in recent years, Walter Reed was shorthand for scandal.

A 2007 series that dominated the front page of The Washington Post told of decrepit housing and wounded soldiers left to fend for themselves.

But the problems were identified years before. Salon.com wrote about it in 2005. Members of Congress later said they had complained to senior Army officials a year or two earlier. Nothing had happened.

Soldiers Fending For Themselves

Among those who had problems at Walter Reed was Oscar Olguin, an Army private who lost a leg in Iraq in 2004, when a suicide bomber struck his Humvee outside the city of Ramadi.

Olguin was discharged from the hospital at night in December 2005, in his wheelchair. He was simply told to find his new quarters.

"I got out. I was in my wheelchair. I was by myself," Olguin says. "I got released in the middle of the night. I'm trying to find my way. So I just started rolling around in my wheelchair and ended up taking the streets and just following the signs to get to Mologne House."

At Walter Reed, Oscar Olguin and his family were visited by President Bush and first lady Laura Bush. But Olguin says that when he left the hospital, he had to fend for himself.

Courtesy of Oscar Olguin

At Walter Reed, Oscar Olguin and his family were visited by President Bush and first lady Laura Bush. But Olguin says that when he left the hospital, he had to fend for himself.

Courtesy of Oscar Olguin

He never checked in with anybody, even as he attended his physical therapy appointments. It wasn't until three months later that Olguin was contacted by an Army master sergeant. "You're in my platoon," the sergeant told him, "and you have to check in with me every morning."

That wasn't Olguin's only problem. He also had a roommate.

1918--3304258977_572f1310f7_o_sq-0ba3a61

"I had a roommate who was suffering from severe PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder], who wasn't supposed to have any sharp objects," Olguin remembers. "I didn't know."

Olguin went on a ski trip with other wounded soldiers, and when he returned, his roommate was gone. Military police had taken him away.

"He tried to slash his own wrists with the knives that I had in my room," says Olguin. "That was probably the worst part. He could have killed himself, and I could've played a part in that and not even known."

The problems had nothing to do with inpatient care, widely seen as some of the best anywhere. Oscar Olguin said the care was first-rate. It had to do with outpatient care — or the lack of it.

A Flood Of Wounded, And Bureaucracy

Soldiers had to navigate the system virtually alone, arranging appointments with doctors and physical therapists, dealing with medicines and paperwork.

"Our military and veterans health care system wasn't ready for an influx of wounded warriors," says Paul Rieckhoff, an Iraq War veteran and head of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, an advocacy group.

"So you saw bad management, you saw an antiquated bureaucracy, sometimes still paper-based," Rieckhoff says. "You saw a failure to understand new types of veterans, like women. You saw a failure to understand new types of injuries, like traumatic brain injury. And I think you saw a military health care system that was caught flat-footed."

The problem was essentially twofold: the volume of wounded soldiers coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan, and the lack of adequate, trained staff.

Workers for IAP World Services peel moldy wallpaper off the walls and make repairs in one of two rooms in Building 18 at Walter Reed in Washington, D.C., in February 2007.

Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Workers for IAP World Services peel moldy wallpaper off the walls and make repairs in one of two rooms in Building 18 at Walter Reed in Washington, D.C., in February 2007.

Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

After the Post series broke, Defense Secretary Robert Gates fired top Army officials who either had downplayed the problems or hadn't moved fast enough to deal with the issues.

Gates brought in Lt. Gen. Eric Schoomaker, a physician himself, to clean up Walter Reed. Schoomaker told NPR that the medical community at the facility was overwhelmed.

The Army ended up hiring a lot more people — about 3,500 — to help care for the wounded soldiers. And the Army set up Warrior Transition Units at Walter Reed and around the nation, 29 in all, that now care for about 10,000 soldiers.

Schoomaker, who has since been named the Army's surgeon general, says each soldier is now being overseen by three separate officials.

"This triad of care, we call [it], around every soldier," Schoomaker says, "consists of a nurse case manager, a primary care manager and a squad leader who's looking out for care and feeding and administrative problems, pay issues, travel issues, educational issues. You're looking at doctors' appointments, or, 'You need time to recover from this before you can go to that.' "

Next Challenges: Drugs, And Long-Term Care

The Army has become more responsive, but there are still problems.

An Army inspector general's report from earlier this year found that as many as one-third of the soldiers in Warrior Transition Units are dependent on drugs, or addicted to them.

The report also found that there are still shortages of psychologists and other behavioral specialists. Those shortages, the report said, can lead to delays in diagnoses and treatment.

The Army says it is dealing with the over-reliance on drugs. It now prescribes only the minimum quantity necessary for treatment, and has started a program that assesses possible "high-risk" soldiers and closely monitors their care.

Also, the Army has increased its use of alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and yoga.

Still, veterans' advocates say that despite the change, both the military and the Department of Veterans Affairs continue to struggle with the overall issue of providing care for the wounded.

Soldiers with horrific physical and psychological wounds continue to return each week from Afghanistan and Iraq. The challenge is to provide them, and their families, with adequate care and support for decades to come.

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What does the fustercluck at Walter Reed have to do with single payer?

 

cc

The VA is a single payer system.

Wasn't that pretty damn obvious?

 

 

only solution...single payer

 

best way to cut costs in health care...get rid of the middlemen that are driving the costs up for doing nothing

The "middlemen" aren't the people driving up costs. When people make these kinds of claims they expose their bias, because the argument holds no water. The Healthcare industry's "take" is miniscule, and actually works to hold DOWN costs, not increase them. When costs go up, the insurance industry loses money. Your argument is 180 degrees backward.

 

There are only 2 ways to contain costs:

1) Reduce services provided, which is what "single payer" and the insurance companies do.

2) Make people responsible for spending their own healthcare dollars. In other works, applying market forces.

 

When "someone else" is paying for the services you receive, what incentive to you have to control costs? None.

Pretending single payer is going to change the basic fact is ignorant.

 

 

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Heres your single payer government run healthcare coming to your town soon,,

 

 

 

Walter Reed Was The Army's Wake-Up Call In 2007

 

Jeremy Duncan, a wounded Army specialist assigned to Walter Reed's Building 18, peels back the wallpaper in one of its rooms to show mold in January 2007.

Michel Du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Jeremy Duncan, a wounded Army specialist assigned to Walter Reed's Building 18, peels back the wallpaper in one of its rooms to show mold in January 2007.

Michel Du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty

For more than a century, the Walter Reed Army Medical Center was known as the hospital that catered to presidents and generals. President Dwight D. Eisenhower was treated and died there. So, too, did Gens. "Black Jack" Pershing, Douglas MacArthur and George Marshall.

But in recent years, Walter Reed was shorthand for scandal.

A 2007 series that dominated the front page of The Washington Post told of decrepit housing and wounded soldiers left to fend for themselves.

But the problems were identified years before. Salon.com wrote about it in 2005. Members of Congress later said they had complained to senior Army officials a year or two earlier. Nothing had happened.

Soldiers Fending For Themselves

Among those who had problems at Walter Reed was Oscar Olguin, an Army private who lost a leg in Iraq in 2004, when a suicide bomber struck his Humvee outside the city of Ramadi.

Olguin was discharged from the hospital at night in December 2005, in his wheelchair. He was simply told to find his new quarters.

"I got out. I was in my wheelchair. I was by myself," Olguin says. "I got released in the middle of the night. I'm trying to find my way. So I just started rolling around in my wheelchair and ended up taking the streets and just following the signs to get to Mologne House."

At Walter Reed, Oscar Olguin and his family were visited by President Bush and first lady Laura Bush. But Olguin says that when he left the hospital, he had to fend for himself.

Courtesy of Oscar Olguin

At Walter Reed, Oscar Olguin and his family were visited by President Bush and first lady Laura Bush. But Olguin says that when he left the hospital, he had to fend for himself.

Courtesy of Oscar Olguin

He never checked in with anybody, even as he attended his physical therapy appointments. It wasn't until three months later that Olguin was contacted by an Army master sergeant. "You're in my platoon," the sergeant told him, "and you have to check in with me every morning."

That wasn't Olguin's only problem. He also had a roommate.

1918--3304258977_572f1310f7_o_sq-0ba3a61

 

"I had a roommate who was suffering from severe PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder], who wasn't supposed to have any sharp objects," Olguin remembers. "I didn't know."

Olguin went on a ski trip with other wounded soldiers, and when he returned, his roommate was gone. Military police had taken him away.

"He tried to slash his own wrists with the knives that I had in my room," says Olguin. "That was probably the worst part. He could have killed himself, and I could've played a part in that and not even known."

The problems had nothing to do with inpatient care, widely seen as some of the best anywhere. Oscar Olguin said the care was first-rate. It had to do with outpatient care — or the lack of it.

A Flood Of Wounded, And Bureaucracy

Soldiers had to navigate the system virtually alone, arranging appointments with doctors and physical therapists, dealing with medicines and paperwork.

"Our military and veterans health care system wasn't ready for an influx of wounded warriors," says Paul Rieckhoff, an Iraq War veteran and head of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, an advocacy group.

"So you saw bad management, you saw an antiquated bureaucracy, sometimes still paper-based," Rieckhoff says. "You saw a failure to understand new types of veterans, like women. You saw a failure to understand new types of injuries, like traumatic brain injury. And I think you saw a military health care system that was caught flat-footed."

The problem was essentially twofold: the volume of wounded soldiers coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan, and the lack of adequate, trained staff.

Workers for IAP World Services peel moldy wallpaper off the walls and make repairs in one of two rooms in Building 18 at Walter Reed in Washington, D.C., in February 2007.

Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Workers for IAP World Services peel moldy wallpaper off the walls and make repairs in one of two rooms in Building 18 at Walter Reed in Washington, D.C., in February 2007.

Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

After the Post series broke, Defense Secretary Robert Gates fired top Army officials who either had downplayed the problems or hadn't moved fast enough to deal with the issues.

Gates brought in Lt. Gen. Eric Schoomaker, a physician himself, to clean up Walter Reed. Schoomaker told NPR that the medical community at the facility was overwhelmed.

The Army ended up hiring a lot more people — about 3,500 — to help care for the wounded soldiers. And the Army set up Warrior Transition Units at Walter Reed and around the nation, 29 in all, that now care for about 10,000 soldiers.

Schoomaker, who has since been named the Army's surgeon general, says each soldier is now being overseen by three separate officials.

"This triad of care, we call [it], around every soldier," Schoomaker says, "consists of a nurse case manager, a primary care manager and a squad leader who's looking out for care and feeding and administrative problems, pay issues, travel issues, educational issues. You're looking at doctors' appointments, or, 'You need time to recover from this before you can go to that.' "

Next Challenges: Drugs, And Long-Term Care

The Army has become more responsive, but there are still problems.

An Army inspector general's report from earlier this year found that as many as one-third of the soldiers in Warrior Transition Units are dependent on drugs, or addicted to them.

The report also found that there are still shortages of psychologists and other behavioral specialists. Those shortages, the report said, can lead to delays in diagnoses and treatment.

The Army says it is dealing with the over-reliance on drugs. It now prescribes only the minimum quantity necessary for treatment, and has started a program that assesses possible "high-risk" soldiers and closely monitors their care.

Also, the Army has increased its use of alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and yoga.

Still, veterans' advocates say that despite the change, both the military and the Department of Veterans Affairs continue to struggle with the overall issue of providing care for the wounded.

Soldiers with horrific physical and psychological wounds continue to return each week from Afghanistan and Iraq. The challenge is to provide them, and their families, with adequate care and support for decades to come.

 

 

Exactly, I honestly am in the wounded warrior program and have been a medic for 8 years...Let me tell you army medice sucks....It has gotten better and we have some awesome doctors but the bureaucracy is unbelievable.... The pain med thing is kind of un fair to use against the military, most of the wounded have suffered orthopedic trauma or other sorts of violent trauma, which involves long periods of intense pain. As someone who has 8 toes amputated i can tell you there is long term pain and px meds make life more livable. The px med dependent numbers are the same across the US with people that have wounds similar to those suffered in combat, just a crapy damned if you do damned if you don't situation.

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only solution...single payer

 

best way to cut costs in health care...get rid of the middlemen that are driving the costs up for doing nothing

Ignorance at work here. Single payer has failed where ever it has been tried. To keep costs down the first thing they do is lower payments to the providers .As the squeeze continues services are reduced for the patients to reduce government costs. Providers try to reduce their costs by cutting the time for each patient while trying to keep up with all of the paperwork the government requires. With many it means going into another line of work thus reducing providers. Already in this country the Mayo Clinic in the west does not accept any more Medicare patients. Medicare already does not pay enough to the providers to pay them for their efforts. They have to make up the lost revenue from Medicare payments by raising payments to the others.

 

Do you have any understanding what it costs to see a physician. When you go to their office look at all the people working there. Insurance and the governments require a ton of paperwork. Some there are experts for insurance others are experts for government paperwork. Requirements by the doctors insurance means very accurate and lengthy notes and so someone has to transcribe the tape recorder to paper and/or computer records. Others get and put away the patients records when they see the doctor. I was born in 1944 and I remember going to a doctor that only had a nurse/receptionist to handle all of that. In addition to all of the people there are a lot of expensive equipment there and a lot of floorspace for the people and equipment. My physician told me that a doctor in their office needs to see 40 patients to break even.

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Heres your single payer government run healthcare coming to your town soon,,

 

 

 

Walter Reed Was The Army's Wake-Up Call In 2007

 

Jeremy Duncan, a wounded Army specialist assigned to Walter Reed's Building 18, peels back the wallpaper in one of its rooms to show mold in January 2007.

Michel Du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Jeremy Duncan, a wounded Army specialist assigned to Walter Reed's Building 18, peels back the wallpaper in one of its rooms to show mold in January 2007.

Michel Du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty

For more than a century, the Walter Reed Army Medical Center was known as the hospital that catered to presidents and generals. President Dwight D. Eisenhower was treated and died there. So, too, did Gens. "Black Jack" Pershing, Douglas MacArthur and George Marshall.

But in recent years, Walter Reed was shorthand for scandal.

A 2007 series that dominated the front page of The Washington Post told of decrepit housing and wounded soldiers left to fend for themselves.

But the problems were identified years before. Salon.com wrote about it in 2005. Members of Congress later said they had complained to senior Army officials a year or two earlier. Nothing had happened.

Soldiers Fending For Themselves

Among those who had problems at Walter Reed was Oscar Olguin, an Army private who lost a leg in Iraq in 2004, when a suicide bomber struck his Humvee outside the city of Ramadi.

Olguin was discharged from the hospital at night in December 2005, in his wheelchair. He was simply told to find his new quarters.

"I got out. I was in my wheelchair. I was by myself," Olguin says. "I got released in the middle of the night. I'm trying to find my way. So I just started rolling around in my wheelchair and ended up taking the streets and just following the signs to get to Mologne House."

At Walter Reed, Oscar Olguin and his family were visited by President Bush and first lady Laura Bush. But Olguin says that when he left the hospital, he had to fend for himself.

Courtesy of Oscar Olguin

At Walter Reed, Oscar Olguin and his family were visited by President Bush and first lady Laura Bush. But Olguin says that when he left the hospital, he had to fend for himself.

Courtesy of Oscar Olguin

He never checked in with anybody, even as he attended his physical therapy appointments. It wasn't until three months later that Olguin was contacted by an Army master sergeant. "You're in my platoon," the sergeant told him, "and you have to check in with me every morning."

That wasn't Olguin's only problem. He also had a roommate.

1918--3304258977_572f1310f7_o_sq-0ba3a61

 

"I had a roommate who was suffering from severe PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder], who wasn't supposed to have any sharp objects," Olguin remembers. "I didn't know."

Olguin went on a ski trip with other wounded soldiers, and when he returned, his roommate was gone. Military police had taken him away.

"He tried to slash his own wrists with the knives that I had in my room," says Olguin. "That was probably the worst part. He could have killed himself, and I could've played a part in that and not even known."

The problems had nothing to do with inpatient care, widely seen as some of the best anywhere. Oscar Olguin said the care was first-rate. It had to do with outpatient care — or the lack of it.

A Flood Of Wounded, And Bureaucracy

Soldiers had to navigate the system virtually alone, arranging appointments with doctors and physical therapists, dealing with medicines and paperwork.

"Our military and veterans health care system wasn't ready for an influx of wounded warriors," says Paul Rieckhoff, an Iraq War veteran and head of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, an advocacy group.

"So you saw bad management, you saw an antiquated bureaucracy, sometimes still paper-based," Rieckhoff says. "You saw a failure to understand new types of veterans, like women. You saw a failure to understand new types of injuries, like traumatic brain injury. And I think you saw a military health care system that was caught flat-footed."

The problem was essentially twofold: the volume of wounded soldiers coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan, and the lack of adequate, trained staff.

Workers for IAP World Services peel moldy wallpaper off the walls and make repairs in one of two rooms in Building 18 at Walter Reed in Washington, D.C., in February 2007.

Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Workers for IAP World Services peel moldy wallpaper off the walls and make repairs in one of two rooms in Building 18 at Walter Reed in Washington, D.C., in February 2007.

Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

After the Post series broke, Defense Secretary Robert Gates fired top Army officials who either had downplayed the problems or hadn't moved fast enough to deal with the issues.

Gates brought in Lt. Gen. Eric Schoomaker, a physician himself, to clean up Walter Reed. Schoomaker told NPR that the medical community at the facility was overwhelmed.

The Army ended up hiring a lot more people — about 3,500 — to help care for the wounded soldiers. And the Army set up Warrior Transition Units at Walter Reed and around the nation, 29 in all, that now care for about 10,000 soldiers.

Schoomaker, who has since been named the Army's surgeon general, says each soldier is now being overseen by three separate officials.

"This triad of care, we call [it], around every soldier," Schoomaker says, "consists of a nurse case manager, a primary care manager and a squad leader who's looking out for care and feeding and administrative problems, pay issues, travel issues, educational issues. You're looking at doctors' appointments, or, 'You need time to recover from this before you can go to that.' "

Next Challenges: Drugs, And Long-Term Care

The Army has become more responsive, but there are still problems.

An Army inspector general's report from earlier this year found that as many as one-third of the soldiers in Warrior Transition Units are dependent on drugs, or addicted to them.

The report also found that there are still shortages of psychologists and other behavioral specialists. Those shortages, the report said, can lead to delays in diagnoses and treatment.

The Army says it is dealing with the over-reliance on drugs. It now prescribes only the minimum quantity necessary for treatment, and has started a program that assesses possible "high-risk" soldiers and closely monitors their care.

Also, the Army has increased its use of alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and yoga.

Still, veterans' advocates say that despite the change, both the military and the Department of Veterans Affairs continue to struggle with the overall issue of providing care for the wounded.

Soldiers with horrific physical and psychological wounds continue to return each week from Afghanistan and Iraq. The challenge is to provide them, and their families, with adequate care and support for decades to come.

 

 

 

 

You're a dumbshyt.

 

VA hospitals better than private:

 

http://www.usmedicine.com/psychiatry/va%E2%80%99s-mental-health-care-as-good-or-better-than-private-sector-study-finds.html?page=2#.Ua0ybfDD9jo

 

Voila!

 

Under obamacare, pre-existing condition healthcare seekers HAVE to be accepted, and for much less than pre-Obamacare rates.

till Obamacare, if you had...say...diabetes...you could not buy insurance from anywhere at any cost. Period.

Lying bastards.

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You're a dumbshyt.

 

VA hospitals better than private:

 

http://www.usmedicine.com/psychiatry/va%E2%80%99s-mental-health-care-as-good-or-better-than-private-sector-study-finds.html?page=2#.Ua0ybfDD9jo

 

Voila!

 

Under obamacare, pre-existing condition healthcare seekers HAVE to be accepted, and for much less than pre-Obamacare rates.

till Obamacare, if you had...say...diabetes...you could not buy insurance from anywhere at any cost. Period.

Lying bastards.

Is not what is being discussed in his links....Active duty care is what is being discussed, not VA, I thought you were a vet Dano? Hmmm??? Cant think of to many vets that would confuse the two..... Muahahahhaha.....But I am sure you know better then me, you probably work in 5-12 hospitals a year, military, VA, and civilian. Oh yeah did I mention that I am combat wounded, recovering from 8 toe amputation, and in the middle of a forced medical retirement. You know way more then me though, just like all that napalm we dropped in Iraq, you read about it on a huffpost so that make it true....SMH... Just stop you libtard.

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