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Infrastructure Rebuilding At These Historically Low Rates Makes So Muc


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Infrastructure rebuilding at these historically low rates makes so much sense that it is hard to believe that the BONEheadedCONgress won't do it even if it helps the President's legacy. Lack of Infrastructure rebuilding & the Sequester are slowing our much needed recovery; & they know it.

 

THROW the BUMS out of Congress in 2014!

 

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Unfortunately we will have to do it at much higher rates after what will probably be 2 or 3 more election cycles as enough votes from the younger generations who need jobs vote out the rightwingers currently responsible for their being unemployed and loaded with student debt.

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Infrastructure rebuilding at these historically low rates makes so much sense that it is hard to believe that the BONEheadedCONgress won't do it even if it helps the President's legacy. Lack of Infrastructure rebuilding & the Sequester are slowing our much needed recovery; & they know it.

 

THROW the BUMS out of Congress in 2014!

 

PeaceFlagEdit2011-4-6_normal.JPG

 

 

True. This is what the guys who actually STUDY economics advise. The Dropout pundits...are trying to play political games that...nobody wins...just because they have a DEFICEIT of ideas. While the clock is ticking....we are TANKING our own economy....because a bunch of AMATEURS think they can use it as a power play. It will...FAIL...but by the time the voters wise up....AMERICA bleeds wealth.

 

We BADLY need the boost of MORE jobs...and we ALSO are behind in dealing with infrastrucure needs that are nessecery and ALSO enhance the economy. A better economy,more jobs,more growth,becomes more REVENUE. We can borrow CHEAP...jack up the growth/revenue and gain enough to pay off ,gain $ and make jobs,a win win. It IS what businesses do, they invest to boost returns.

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Do you even know what infrastructure means?

Yep, it means post roads (should be including PMT & transportation networks to space too), bridges, levees, electrical grids & water storage systems, at the very least.

 

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Infrastructure rebuilding at these historically low rates makes so much sense that it is hard to believe that the BONEheadedCONgress won't do it even if it helps the President's legacy. Lack of Infrastructure rebuilding & the Sequester are slowing our much needed recovery; & they know it.

 

THROW the BUMS out of Congress in 2014!

 

PeaceFlagEdit2011-4-6_normal.JPG

 

 

 

You seem very knowledgeable on this subject, at least counting the times you have started threads on infrastructure. Can you name the BILL NUMBERS, BILL NAMES and some of the Democrat BILL SPONSORS of INFRASTRUCTURE BILLS currently before Congress that are being blocked by Republicans? We'd all love to know.

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Infrastructure rebuilding at these historically low rates makes so much sense that it is hard to believe that the BONEheadedCONgress won't do it even if it helps the President's legacy. Lack of Infrastructure rebuilding & the Sequester are slowing our much needed recovery; & they know it.

 

THROW the BUMS out of Congress in 2014!

 

PeaceFlagEdit2011-4-6_normal.JPG

 

 

Agreed.

 

 

You seem very knowledgeable on this subject, at least counting the times you have started threads on infrastructure. Can you name the BILL NUMBERS, BILL NAMES and some of the Democrat BILL SPONSORS of INFRASTRUCTURE BILLS currently before Congress that are being blocked by Republicans? We'd all love to know.

He did not say one word about republicans in the post that you responded to. He indicted all of congress, and I agreed with him.

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Guess what happens to historically low interest rates when the economy gets going placing a higher demand on money?

 

That's right. Those interest rates go UP. We're spending half a trillion a year JUST servicing our federal debt now.

 

Guess what happens when the interest rate triples??? :lol: That's right! Paying the interest on our federal debt will likely be the LARGEST expense of the federal government.....

 

How's spending 1.5 TRILLION annually to pay off interest and service fees going to affect the economy?

 

Anyone???

 

Anyone????



That's why economists generally frown on high debt to GDP ratios.......

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Guess what happens to historically low interest rates when the economy gets going placing a higher demand on money?

 

That's right. Those interest rates go UP. We're spending half a trillion a year JUST servicing our federal debt now.

 

Sounds like you agree the time to do it is during low cost money.

 

Makes sense to me. Good to see you not being a predictable partisan hack one time. :)

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Sounds like you agree the time to do it is during low cost money.

 

Makes sense to me. Good to see you not being a predictable partisan hack one time. :)

 

NOOOOO.... You start kicking the economy in high gear we'll be eating historically high interest payments on our federal debt......

 

Which of course comes DIRECTLY out of the economy.

 

It's the reason WHY perpetual Keynesian economics doesn't work.....

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Oops.

 

Hey, just out of curiosity, have you ever heard of locking in rates?

T-bills are short term for a reason. Nobody is going to buy debt long term at historically low interest rates..... Well maybe progressives if they had any disposable income....:lol:

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http://www.bloomberg.com/markets/rates-bonds/government-bonds/us/

 

 

US Treasury 2 Year Yield 0.20% 0 -4 -6 04:40:00

US Treasury 5 Year Yield 0.65% 0 -12 -17 04:48:00

US Treasury 10 Year Yield 1.64% +1 -22 -29 04:38:00

US Treasury 30 Year Yield 2.84% +1 -27 -28 04:52:00

 

If they're still selling these, someone is buying them. :)



Now is the time to invest in infrastructure. It's CRITICAL that we do so, as our infrastructure is in fact crumbling. We cannot avoid it unless we agree to become a third world nation - quite literally. We simply have no other choice. We can invest in infrastructure, or we can become mexico. That's that. It's not politics - it's fact.

 

Now is the time. The OP is correct.

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http://www.bloomberg.com/markets/rates-bonds/government-bonds/us/

 

 

US Treasury 2 Year Yield 0.20% 0 -4 -6 04:40:00

US Treasury 5 Year Yield 0.65% 0 -12 -17 04:48:00

US Treasury 10 Year Yield 1.64% +1 -22 -29 04:38:00

US Treasury 30 Year Yield 2.84% +1 -27 -28 04:52:00

 

If they're still selling these, someone is buying them. :)

 

 

Now is the time to invest in infrastructure. It's CRITICAL that we do so, as our infrastructure is in fact crumbling. We cannot avoid it unless we agree to become a third world nation - quite literally. We simply have no other choice. We can invest in infrastructure, or we can become mexico. That's that. It's not politics - it's fact.

 

Now is the time. The OP is correct.

Those are bonds not T-bills. The longest T-bill is a year I believe.

 

Become Mexico..... :lol: That's some strong rhetoric there....

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Those are bonds not T-bills. The longest T-bill is a year I believe.

 

Become Mexico..... :lol: That's some strong rhetoric there....

 

Dude, it's very accurate. We've been skating on a lot of FDR legacy infrastructure for a LONG time, without even keeping up our end on freaking general maintenance.

 

And bonds are what they use for building projects, are they not?

 

http://www.infrastructurereportcard.org/bridges/

 

Over two hundred million trips are taken daily across deficient bridges in the nation’s 102 largest metropolitan regions. In total, one in nine of the nation’s bridges are rated as structurally deficient, while the average age of the nation’s 607,380 bridges is currently 42 years. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) estimates that to eliminate the nation’s bridge deficient backlog by 2028, we would need to invest $20.5 billion annually, while only $12.8 billion is being spent currently. The challenge for federal, state, and local governments is to increase bridge investments by $8 billion annually to address the identified $76 billion in needs for deficient bridges across the United States.

 

The health of our nation’s bridges is directly tied to the nation’s ability to compete in a global marketplace. Therefore, it is of growing concern that the bridges in our nation’s metropolitan areas, which are an indispensable link for both millions of commuters and freight on a daily basis, are decaying more rapidly than our rural bridges. Approximately 210 million trips are taken daily across deficient bridges in the nation’s 102 largest metropolitan regions.

The percentage of bridges that are either functionally obsolete or structurally deficient has been declining slowly over the last decade as states and cities have increased efforts to prioritize repairs and replacements. In 2012, one in nine, or just below 11%, of the nation’s bridges were classified as structurally deficient. The number of bridges defined as functionally obsolete has also declined, with currently 24.9% of the nation’s bridges defined in either deficiency category. However, while billions have been spent annually on bridge construction, rehabilitation, and repair in the last twenty years, current funding levels are not enough to repair or replace the nation’s large-scale, urban bridges, which carry a high percentage of the nation’s traffic. To illustrate, the nation’s 66,749 structurally deficient bridges make up one-third of the total bridge decking area in the country, showing that those bridges that remain classified as structurally deficient are significant in size and length, while the bridges that are being repaired are smaller in scale.

At the state level, 22 states have a higher percentage of structurally deficient bridges than the national average, while five states have more than 20% of their bridges defined as structurally deficient. Pennsylvania tops the list with 24.4%, while Iowa and Oklahoma are not far behind, each having just over 21% of their bridges classified as structurally deficient. When looking at the highest percentage of deficient bridges (combined structurally deficient and functionally obsolete bridge categories), the nation’s capital tops all 50 states, with 77%, or 185 of 239, of bridges in the District of Columbia falling into at least one of these categories.

While it is important to look at the decrease in the overall number of bridges that are classified as either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete, there are other critical aspects to assess when grading the nation’s bridges. Looking beyond deficiency classifications, the total percentage of postings on the nation’s bridges has declined gradually over the past five years. While the number of bridges closed to traffic has climbed from 2,816 in 2007 to 3,585 in 2012, the number of bridges posted for load restrictions has decreased from 67,969 to 60,971 in that same period. Posted bridges are not necessarily a public safety risk, but they can create congestion and force emergency vehicles and trucks to take lengthy detours when the bridge is closed, making it harder, and more costly, for goods to get to market.

Finally, the average age of the nation’s bridges has also slightly declined, as bridges have been constructed or replaced, from 43 years in 2009 to 42 years currently. Regardless, the FHWA calculates that more than 30% of existing bridges have exceeded their 50-year design life, meaning that maintenance, repair, and rehabilitation programs will still require significant investment in the upcoming years. Unfortunately, preserving aging bridges while replacing deficient bridges is a significant challenge for cash-strapped state and local governments to manage.

 

That's just bridges. Then there is aviation.

 

The primary source of the FAA’s capital programs and general operations is the Airport and Airway Trust Fund (Trust Fund). The Trust Fund receives its revenue from excise taxes paid by users of the national aviation systems, including airline passengers, and also taxes charged on ticket purchases and aviation fuel, as well as the shipment of cargo. The Trust Fund provided 68.8% of the FAA budget in 2011, with the rest coming from general treasury appropriations. The Trust Fund's purpose was to establish sources of funding that would increase concurrently with the use of the system, and assure timely and long-term commitments to capacity increases.

Generally, four sources of funding are used to finance airport development – airport cash flow, revenue and general obligation bonds, federal, state, and local grants (including the Trust Fund-financed Airport Improvement Program), and Passenger Facilities Charges (PFCs). Since fiscal year (FY) 2001, AIP grants have exceeded $3 billion annually, and for the last seven years, PFC collections have exceeded $2 billion annually. Combined, AIP grants and PFC collections account for 40% of annual U.S. airport capital spending. In 2008, commercial service airports reported spending $10.9 billion in development projects.

When Congress reauthorized the FAA in 2012, the AIP was authorized at $13.4 billion over four years or approximately $3.35 billion annually. This represents a slight cut to the AIP, which in the last few fiscal years received $3.5 billion annually. The nation’s airports, including both commercial and general aviation airports, have an estimated $80.1 billion in total projects between 2011 and 2015 that are considered essential by the airport and airport users. With current funding trends, the total gap between anticipated funding and the capital needs projected by airports is about $2.2 billion a year between 2012 and 2020. If the funding needs of NextGen are added, that increases to about $4.3 billion from 2012 to 2020, during the largest implementation phase.

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Back to bridges:

 

Bridges: Conclusion
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C+
2013 GRADE
Surface Transportation: Facts Behind the Grade

While the overall number of deficient bridges continues to decline, there is still a long road ahead. With the total number of structurally deficient or functionally obsolete bridges at more than 20%, the nation needs to remain focused on aging bridges and work diligently to decrease the total number to below 15% over the next decade.

Most importantly, states will have to focus on repairing or replacing those large-scale bridges in urban areas where their upkeep has been consistently deferred due to the significant cost to repair these structures.

Raising the Grades: Solutions that Work Now
  • Make the repair of structurally deficient urban bridges a top national priority through the implementation of a risk-based prioritization model.
  • Increase annual investment levels for bridge repair, reconstruction, and renovation by approximately $8 billion annually from all levels of government, to a total annual funding level of $20.5 billion.
  • Develop a national strategic plan for addressing the nation’s structurally deficient and functionally obsolete bridges in the upcoming decades, including long-term transportation research in order to develop more resilient bridges.
  • Set a national goal to decrease the number of just structurally deficient bridges to 8% by 2020 and decrease the percentage of the population driving over all deficient bridges by 75% by 2020.


Here's a glossary of terms:

 

 

 

Structurally Deficient — Bridges that require significant maintenance, rehabilitation, or replacement. These bridges must be inspected at least every year since critical load-carrying elements were found to be in poor condition due to deterioration or damage.

Deficient Bridges — Total of both structurally deficient and functionally obsolete bridges.

State of Good Repair — Condition in which the existing physical assets are functioning as designed within their useful service life and sustained through regular maintenance and replacement programs.12

Functionally Obsolete — Bridges that no longer meet the current standards that are used today. Examples are narrow lanes or low load-carrying capacity.

Posted Bridges — Engineers determine the safe load-carrying capacity of the nation's bridges. When that capacity is found to be less than standard load limits; a bridge may be posted to limit the weight of vehicles, restrict the number of vehicles, or reduce vehicle speeds on the bridge

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How many times have you seen a road repaved that didn't need repaved??? At $250-300K per mile just how many roads you think will get repaved??

 

Got a total price tag??

 

All I see when you talk about investing in the future "is padding someones pocket" and the work never gets done,,,,

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