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lostphoenix

@ Gailybee

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I have a teacher question.

 

I dont know what age kids you teach, I am sure you have said but I forgot

but anyways

 

how many lessons do you plan throughout the school year?...do you schedule these before the school year starts or throughout the year?

 

is there a set amount of lessons>? and are you required to cover certain topic's?....basically how "structured" is the teaching profession how much room is there for improvisation?

 

and lastly

 

do you feel pressured to "teach for the test" (just teaching what will be on a certain test), by whoever... parents included

 

 

 

my interest is personal...I like to get my honey (info) straight from the beehive so to speak

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I have a teacher question.

 

I dont know what age kids you teach, I am sure you have said but I forgot

but anyways

 

how many lessons do you plan throughout the school year?...do you schedule these before the school year starts or throughout the year?

 

is there a set amount of lessons>? and are you required to cover certain topic's?....basically how "structured" is the teaching profession how much room is there for improvisation?

 

and lastly

 

do you feel pressured to "teach for the test" (just teaching what will be on a certain test), by whoever... parents included

 

 

 

my interest is personal...I like to get my honey (info) straight from the beehive so to speak

 

I <3 you...

 

 

This year my job is changing and I will be teaching English (as an English Specialist) to elementary kids as a second language. Their first language is ASL.

I have already begun my lesson plans--I'm working with the ASL Specialist--and our year is roughed out, month by month. We will meet a few more times this summer to do the daily planning.

 

The State has requirements, and each child with whom I work has an I.E.P. (individualized education plan), so there are goals and objectives and benchmarks we have to work toward.

 

Teaching to the test is something that many/most teachers do. It isn't supposed to happen, but it does. Deaf kids are not incidental learners--they don't hear information and assimilate it like hearing kids do--they have to be taught specifically. Example: make claw shapes with your hands and drag them down--'rain'--now, think of all the different words you know that describe 'rain'...drizzle, downpour, deluge, cats-and-dogs, smattering, showers. Each of those concepts and the vocabulary have to be taught--hearing kids simply pick up that vocabulary from hearing their parents talk about the weather.

 

Fascinating, right? I love what I am blessed to do.

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I <3 you...

 

 

This year my job is changing and I will be teaching English (as an English Specialist) to elementary kids as a second language. Their first language is ASL.

I have already begun my lesson plans--I'm working with the ASL Specialist--and our year is roughed out, month by month. We will meet a few more times this summer to do the daily planning.

 

The State has requirements, and each child with whom I work has an I.E.P. (individualized education plan), so there are goals and objectives and benchmarks we have to work toward.

 

Teaching to the test is something that many/most teachers do. It isn't supposed to happen, but it does. Deaf kids are not incidental learners--they don't hear information and assimilate it like hearing kids do--they have to be taught specifically. Example: make claw shapes with your hands and drag them down--'rain'--now, think of all the different words you know that describe 'rain'...drizzle, downpour, deluge, cats-and-dogs, smattering, showers. Each of those concepts and the vocabulary have to be taught--hearing kids simply pick up that vocabulary from hearing their parents talk about the weather.

 

Fascinating, right? I love what I am blessed to do.

 

I didn't know you were a teacher! I have to say that I have so much respect for what you do. Some of my teachers were the biggest influences on my life. My highschool history and seminar teacher, a rather large middle-aged Italian man, was by far my favorite. Set aside that I could get away with whatever I wanted in there (hehe) I knew as long as he was there I always had somewhere I could go at any time during the day and if I ever had a problem, school related or personal, I always had the option to turn to him for help. And I wasn't the only one. There was this girl who had a pretty rough life. Family issues and such and was planning since the age of 14 (probably before) to drop out of school once she was 16. He was the only one that could convince her otherwise and because of that she now has her deploma and I heard was planning on going to the community college.

I may not of had the problems she did, but it sure made school alot easier knowing I had a 2nd home there. Yeah I had some crappy teachers too, but the good ones far outweighed the bad. The guy I mentioned earlier is planning on retiring this year and I'm planning on buying him an expensive box of cigars as a retirement gift though it's really not near enough (And no, it's not because he's Italian. I happen to know he loves cigars :D )

This is why I have so much respect and love for what you do. And I have the feeling you're a wonderful teacher! :)

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I didn't know you were a teacher! I have to say that I have so much respect for what you do. Some of my teachers were the biggest influences on my life. My highschool history and seminar teacher, a rather large middle-aged Italian man, was by far my favorite. Set aside that I could get away with whatever I wanted in there (hehe) I knew as long as he was there I always had somewhere I could go at any time during the day and if I ever had a problem, school related or personal, I always had the option to turn to him for help. And I wasn't the only one. There was this girl who had a pretty rough life. Family issues and such and was planning since the age of 14 (probably before) to drop out of school once she was 16. He was the only one that could convince her otherwise and because of that she now has her deploma and I heard was planning on going to the community college.

I may not of had the problems she did, but it sure made school alot easier knowing I had a 2nd home there. Yeah I had some crappy teachers too, but the good ones far outweighed the bad. The guy I mentioned earlier is planning on retiring this year and I'm planning on buying him an expensive box of cigars as a retirement gift though it's really not near enough (And no, it's not because he's Italian. I happen to know he loves cigars :D )

This is why I have so much respect and love for what you do. And I have the feeling you're a wonderful teacher! :)

 

What a beautiful tribute to your teachers!

 

I have been a sign language interpreter since the early 80s--back when dinosaurs roamed the earth--but over time, my job has changed with the needs of our students.

 

A few years ago I began working with a group of Deaf students who couldn't read--or who didn't read at grade level. We have a teacher of the Deaf, but I have the passion, so we decided that he would turn it over to me under his supervision.

 

In the fall, I will be moving to the elementary school and work in a bilingual-bimodal program that we are setting up in the hopes that these kids will be reading at/near grade level when they get to the high school in a few years.

 

Reading is magic, but for most Deaf kids it is pure hard work and a little bit of torture. My students and I make it fun. I ask them if they're ready to 'Play English', and they are enthusiastic about the games we play. I make them up as we go along and I see where the gaps are--they are encouraged to work together and to share their ideas--no covering up your answers with us!

 

I cannot begin to tell you how much I have loved my life...or what these children have brought into my life over the years...bliss...

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I have a niece who is currently going to college to become a teacher. She says that her biggest influence in school was her 6th grade english teacher who taught her the value of a good education by spending extra time with her on a particularly difficult assignment.

 

When she told me this story it brought back memories of my 8th grade world history teacher who made time for me when I was having trouble in his class. Now that I look back on it I realize that he was my favorite teacher. He always managed to make his class interesting and fun for the students as opposed to just spewing out facts and forcing information down our throats in time for the next test. He also awoke in me a passion for world history. To this day it just fascinates me. Particularly the Civil War and the Roman Empire.

 

I'm sure that there are others out there with similar storys about favorite teachers. Your profession has come under fire in recent years but just know that there are many of us out there who support and appreciate everything you do for our children and for ourselves.

 

"The only thing more expensive than education is ignorance." Benjamin Franklin

 

"Teach the children so that it will not be necessary to teach the adults." Abraham Lincoln

Edited by The Scrutinizer

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I have a niece who is currently going to college to become a teacher. She says that her biggest influence in school was her 6th grade english teacher who taught her the value of a good education by spending extra time with her on a particularly difficult assignment.

 

When she told me this story it brought back memories of my 8th grade world history teacher who made time for me when I was having trouble in his class. Now that I look back on it I realize that he was my favorite teacher. He always managed to make his class interesting and fun for the students as opposed to just spewing out facts and forcing information down our throats in time for the next test. He also awoke in me a passion for world history. To this day it just fascinates me. Particularly the Civil War and the Roman Empire.

 

I'm sure that there are others out there with similar storys about favorite teachers. Your profession has come under fire in recent years but just know that there are many of us out there who support and appreciate everything you do for our children and for ourselves.

 

"The only thing more expensive than education is ignorance." Benjamin Franklin

 

"Teach the children so that it will not be necessary to teach the adults." Abraham Lincoln

 

Thank you for your kind words and for the support.

 

I work with teachers who go the extra miles on a daily basis. Yes, the education system in the US needs to be reworked and, yes, there are mouthbreathers who are simply wasting time and space in front of our kids--but overall, in my experience, our teachers bend and flex and strive harder to reach every child every year.

 

I am proud to be part of the education system, and I am proud of those teachers.

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What a beautiful tribute to your teachers!

 

I have been a sign language interpreter since the early 80s--back when dinosaurs roamed the earth--but over time, my job has changed with the needs of our students.

 

A few years ago I began working with a group of Deaf students who couldn't read--or who didn't read at grade level. We have a teacher of the Deaf, but I have the passion, so we decided that he would turn it over to me under his supervision.

 

In the fall, I will be moving to the elementary school and work in a bilingual-bimodal program that we are setting up in the hopes that these kids will be reading at/near grade level when they get to the high school in a few years.

 

Reading is magic, but for most Deaf kids it is pure hard work and a little bit of torture. My students and I make it fun. I ask them if they're ready to 'Play English', and they are enthusiastic about the games we play. I make them up as we go along and I see where the gaps are--they are encouraged to work together and to share their ideas--no covering up your answers with us!

 

I cannot begin to tell you how much I have loved my life...or what these children have brought into my life over the years...bliss...

 

The passion with which you speak about your work and your life is wonderful to hear. To me, one of the most important things in life is that years down the road when you're down to your last days in the world is to be able to look back at it all with happiness and too many fond memories to tell. It seems to me that you are definatly on that path. I can't say I'm there yet or even close, but when I read something like what you have written I know without a doubt that I want to be someday. And I hope that in some way I can make a positive impact on people's lives as you have with these children. We need a few more people like you in this world. :)

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gailyBee, the main problem in our Education System is that teachers get all the criticism, thanks to a discriminatory local-funding system, and none of the recognition they deserve.

 

thank you for you do and have done for your students!!

 

:)

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Gailybee, I was wondering if you had heard Mitt Romney's statements about how large class size doesn't matter and how he would gut the department of education and either combine what was left with another department or use it to go after the teachers unions.

 

It seems like he has some wierd vendetta against public education. Any thoughts? I would be really interested to hear an opinion on this from a teacher.

Edited by The Scrutinizer

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My mother taught young EMR (or whatever they call it now) for about 25 years. Then she decided to switch to 1st/2nd grade. Not because the teaching was difficult or unrewarding but because she stood on the scale, picked up her stack of IEPs and decided that 5 pounds of paperwork was a bit excessive for 18 students.

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The passion with which you speak about your work and your life is wonderful to hear. To me, one of the most important things in life is that years down the road when you're down to your last days in the world is to be able to look back at it all with happiness and too many fond memories to tell. It seems to me that you are definatly on that path. I can't say I'm there yet or even close, but when I read something like what you have written I know without a doubt that I want to be someday. And I hope that in some way I can make a positive impact on people's lives as you have with these children. We need a few more people like you in this world. :)

 

YOU are 'people like' me, Rob. Thank you for being willing and eager to 'pick up the towel'...

 

LIB: I wish you could experience even one-tenth of what the kids have done for ME...I am the most blessed person on this planet BECAUSE of the the children with whom I work. No lie. They feed my soul.

 

 

EG: The paperwork is ridiculous. Thankfully, I'm on the 'fun' side of education--I interpret, teach under supervision, and roll around in big fat JOY every single day. God bless your mother.

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