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BeAChooser

Dark Matter Even More Missing Now ...

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1 hour ago, BeAChooser said:

Now the LHC’s immense cost might not be wasted if mainstream physicists would only learn something from this failure.   But they won’t.   They’ll go on dreaming up more mathematical gnomes, ask for more billions to build even *bigger/better* colliders and experiments, and end up wasting more money (and opportunity).  All while ignoring the elephant in the room.     In fact, here’s what planned ( https://www.sciencealert.com/work-is-already-beginning-on-the-large-hadron-collider-s-replacement ) ... a collider (called the XLHC) that’s will be about 100 km in circumference (compared to the LHC’s 27):

 

surprised to see that plan, seems like some have ruled it out already 

 

but yeah it took 50 years to find the higgs boson  . Things take time and 50 years is very  short amount of time 

 

 My electric universe is floating fine with funding for fusion 

 

jet propulsion looks like a blast too ! yeah ?

 

 all of it works better with your ideas ... and no one invest in it ? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, rrober49 said:

but yeah it took 50 years to find the higgs boson  .

 

Of what value is a Higgs Boson?   Hmmmmm?

 

6 minutes ago, rrober49 said:

My electric universe is floating fine with funding for fusion 

 

And how's that fusion research going?   

They any closer than they were 50 years ago?

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10 hours ago, rrober49 said:

but yeah it took 50 years to find the higgs boson  . Things take time and 50 years is very  short amount of time

 

You're right, and here's why. In general, you can say this about acquisition of understanding in sci/tech:

 

Knowledge that is easy and inexpensive to acquire is always acquired first. Knowledge that takes great genius to acquire, or that takes very expensive equipment takes longer. The knowledge that takes the longest to acquire is the knowledge that takes teams of great geniuses working together with very expensive equipment.

 

Because it's hard to get all the pieces in place it usually takes many smart people to acquire data over a long time, and then a few rare geniuses to come along to make sense of it.

 

One thing is true for sure: for difficult and esoteric topics, the simple and facile answer is wrong. People who offer simple and facile answers to difficult topics usually do so with great resentment, and are wrong at the top of their lungs.

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Well said Laripu 

 

 it will come to us in its own time and its own way, still I can not blame a person for hope and wanting to make sense of it all 

 

I think theory is a fun thing to share and explore, shame it is not under more neutral  medium

 

 seems out place for water cooler content 

 

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6 hours ago, rrober49 said:

seems out place for water cooler content 

 

Thus is instructive. It's fiction, but still.

 

confessions-of-a-crap-artist-1_thumb.jpg

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10 hours ago, laripu said:

 

You're right, and here's why. In general, you can say this about acquisition of understanding in sci/tech:

 

Knowledge that is easy and inexpensive to acquire is always acquired first. Knowledge that takes great genius to acquire, or that takes very expensive equipment takes longer. The knowledge that takes the longest to acquire is the knowledge that takes teams of great geniuses working together with very expensive equipment.

 

Because it's hard to get all the pieces in place it usually takes many smart people to acquire data over a long time, and then a few rare geniuses to come along to make sense of it.

 

One thing is true for sure: for difficult and esoteric topics, the simple and facile answer is wrong. People who offer simple and facile answers to difficult topics usually do so with great resentment, and are wrong at the top of their lungs.

 

So ... uh ... you must know what the dark matter is ... eh, laripu?

 

And you must have an explanation for all those helically wound filaments the telescopes now show out there?   Care to offer it?

 

And perhaps you'd like to predict when the mainstream will actually get a workable commercial fusion reactor ... with the approach they are taking?

 

Or must we wait another 70 years?

 

B)

 

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This radio telescope image of the center of our galaxy is from the SKA MeerKAT telescope.   

 

MeerKAT_Galactic-Centre_Low-Res.jpg

(enlarged here: http://www.ska.ac.za/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/MeerKAT_Galactic-Centre_Low-Res.jpg )

 

It was made in 2018.   Just look at all the plasma filaments, laripu.  Many are clearly helically wound.  The mainstream didn't predict this.   Plasma cosmologists did.

 

As this (http://www.ska.ac.za/media-releases/meerkat-radio-telescope-inaugurated-in-south-africa-reveals-clearest-view-yet-of-center-of-the-milky-way/ ) notes

 

Quote

“This image is remarkable”, says Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, one of the world’s leading experts on the mysterious filamentary structures present near the central black hole but nowhere else in the Milky Way. These long and narrow magnetised filaments were discovered in the 1980s using the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico, but their origin has remained a mystery. “The MeerKAT image has such clarity”, continues Yusef-Zadeh, “it shows so many features never before seen, including compact sources associated with some of the filaments, that it could provide the key to cracking the code and solve this three-decade riddle”.

 

Now surely you (or roper49) have got an explanation using all the gnomes of mainstream cosmology that you believe in?

 

One that is better than what the plasma cosmologists have offered for ... what now? ... 50 years ... when they first predicted that this is what we'd find there?

 

B)

 

 

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2 hours ago, BeAChooser said:

 

So ... uh ... you must know what the dark matter is ... eh, laripu?

 

And you must have an explanation for all those helically wound filaments the telescopes now show out there?   Care to offer it?

 

And perhaps you'd like to predict when the mainstream will actually get a workable commercial fusion reactor ... with the approach they are taking?

 

Or must we wait another 70 years?

 

B)

 

 

I'm not involved in the specifics of this discussion. I was writing generally.

 

Maybe you're right about whatever it is you're on about. If you're right or if you're wrong, either way my insurance premiums won't go up. :rolleyes:

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6 hours ago, laripu said:

either way my insurance premiums won't go up.

 

Maybe not your insurance premiums, but your taxes have been going up as a result of all the gnomes the mainstream astrophysicists have been pursuing.

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12 hours ago, BeAChooser said:

Maybe not your insurance premiums, but your taxes have been going up as a result of all the gnomes the mainstream astrophysicists have been pursuing.

 

1. My taxes are historically low. I'd happily see them raised in exchange for any number of public services, chief among those universal healthcare.

2. I like astrophysicists. Whatever they pursue, good luck to them. They're far, far more believable than priests, imams, and rabbis.

3. Gnomes? Ok Gnomerish.

 

Gnoman is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.

You exhort against science with jabber incontinent,

Therefore leave me alone with your petite trollish brain.

 

I don't care about dark matter, I don't care about plasmas,

I don't care if you're pissed off, angry or incensed.

I'll recognize genius whenever I see it.

It'll be who the dunces are confederate against.

 

With love and affection,

Laripu. 💋💓

 

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6 minutes ago, laripu said:

 

1. My taxes are historically low.

 

 

They'd be even lower if not the billions being spent looking for gnomes.

 

6 minutes ago, laripu said:

2. I like astrophysicists.

 

Why?  They've turned real astrophysics into a cult pursing non-existent gnomes.

 

6 minutes ago, laripu said:

3. Gnomes?

 

Yes, as thoroughly explained on this thread, many of the things that mainstream astrophysicists believe in are nothing but gnomes ... as in nonexistent.

 

6 minutes ago, laripu said:

I don't care about dark matter, I don't care about plasmas

 

Dark matter doesn't affect your life other than to make you somewhat poorer and perhaps delay a real understanding the universe ... and all the good that might come from that.  In contrast, plasmas do affect your life, every day, in countless ways.    You really should care about us thoroughly understanding them.  And care that money that could be used to understand them is now being diverted into an endless search for gnomes.

 

6 minutes ago, laripu said:

I don't care if you're pissed off, angry or incensed.

 

And yet, here you are.

 

6 minutes ago, laripu said:

I'll recognize genius whenever I see it.

 

And which geniuses are you referring to ... the ones who claim there's dark matter without any real legitimate evidence of it?

 

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20 minutes ago, BeAChooser said:

And which geniuses are you referring to ... the ones who claim there's dark matter without any real legitimate evidence of it?

 

An agenda's being flogged...

And I'm unwilling to drop even

one single quarter into the cup.

All my quarters are given

to the "astrophysicist cabal".

Let them mightily theorize

'til their theory's used up.

 

I hear there are people who think the earth young.

They're told it's a mere six thousand years old.

And some who assume all vaccines are evil,

that people, like sheep, do whatever they're told.

But you can do anything! Whatever you want!

Build a lab, do some research, go prove that you're right!

As for me, I'm happy to just poke fun at you

in verses and rhymes, all day and all night.

 

(Disclaimer: not actually true, I'm getting bored of this.)

 

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11 hours ago, BeAChooser said:

Which geniuses were you referring to?

 

You are a pretty literal person. I wrote you verse in response to a question about a line in a verse and you want a literal answer? I'm making fun of you in rhyme and you want to poke at your dark matter obsession?

 

Fine, ok, after this I'm out, not responding to you at all. I said that I'll recognize genius when I see it. Here's how you recognize genius:

 

A genius comprises a number of attributes:

- The intelligence (of which high IQ may be one measure) required to study and learn very difficult topics. (In sci/tech knowledge explodes exponentially, so it's becoming harder faster than in, for example, literature.)

- The drive to then learn the topic or topics above. Thus is getting harder all the time because many fields are multidusciplinary. To be a top experimental neuroscientist today, you need skill in biochemistry, physics, computer science, cellular medicine, genetics, evolution and possibly some microsurgical skills. To learn what you need takes drive and obssession.

- An important accomplishment, recognized as such by other experts in that field. Maybe that's science, maybe literature, maybe cinema.

- The ability to communicate the importance if the accomplishment, whether that is via scientific peer-reviewed published papers or by other means (e.g. getting a book published or a movie made).

 

So you'll know them by their great accomplishments, arriving at which which took years of learning and effort.

 

That's it, that's all. Bye, bye sweetie-pie.

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3 minutes ago, laripu said:

... non responsive AGAIN ...

 

I didn't ask you what a genius is, dolt.   I asked you "which geniuses were you referring to?"  

 

Who are these people you call geniuses, snowflake.  NAME THEM.  

 

Because surely you aren't calling those who dreamed up the gnomes that astrophysics has spent 70 years and billions of dollars fruitlessly pursuing ... geniuses.  

 

Surely.

 

To me they seem more like misguided cult leaders ... or scam artists.

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Gosh ... with great fanfare in 2017, we were promised that we'd finally get to see a photo ... a real image ... of a black hole in 2018.

 

But here we are on the last day of the year and still NOTHING.

 

Gee ... are the folks laripu and presumably rrober49 think are geniuses having a problem getting that picture?

 

:lol:

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See?

 

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24032093-300-2019-preview-we-will-see-the-first-ever-picture-of-a-black-hole/2019 Preview: We will see the first ever picture of a black hole

 

They're promising the picture in 2019 now.

 

But they promised it in 2018 ...

 

https://www.eso.org/public/usa/outreach/first-picture-of-a-black-hole/blog/ “Taking the First Picture of a Black Hole … 1.8.2017 … The observations with the EHT and the GMVA were completed in April 2017. The data collected by the antennas around the world has been sent to the US and Germany, where data processing will be conducted with dedicated data-processing computers called correlators. The data from the South Pole Telescope, one of the participating telescopes in the EHT, will arrive at the end of 2017, and then data calibration and data synthesis will begin in order to produce an image, if possible. This process might take several months to achieve the goal of obtaining the first image of a black hole, which is eagerly awaited by black hole researchers and the general astronomical community worldwide.”


http://www.astronomy.com/news/2017/04/first-image-of-a-black-hole “Get ready for our first image of a black hole … April 6, 2017 … in a few months, we may finally have our first picture of the region immediately around a supermassive black hole.


https://www.foxnews.com/science/in-2018-we-will-see-a-black-hole-for-the-first-time-ever “December 20, 2017 … In 2018, we will see a black hole for the first time ever


https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/space/blogs/first-image-black-hole-almost-hereThe first image of a black hole is almost ready … January 10, 2018


https://futurism.com/this-year-black-hole-first-time-historyThis Year, We’ll See a Black Hole for the First Time in History … January 10, 2018

 

https://earthsky.org/space/1st-direct-black-hole-2018-image-event-horizon-telescopeScientists expect 1st direct black hole image soon … March 10, 2018

 

So what gives?  

 

Are they having problems getting that image?  

 

Is dark matter getting in the way?

 

It the black hole absorbing all the light they need to photograph it?

 

Inquiring minds want to know!

 

B)

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http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/black-holes-corona-06771.html

 

Quote

 

Supermassive Black Holes Have Weaker Coronal Magnetic Field Than Expected


Dec 31, 2018


Supermassive black holes that lurk at the center of most galaxies are surrounded by coronas — mysterious features that are sources of highly energetic particles. Like the Sun, black hole coronas are theoretically believed to be heated by their magnetic activity. Now, astrophysicists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have measured the magnetic fields surrounding central supermassive black holes in two active galaxies. Surprisingly, the strength of these magnetic fields does not appear to be high enough to power the black hole coronas.

 


Oh dear …

 

Continuing from the source ...

 

Quote

 

In a 2014 study, Japanese astrophysicists Yoshiyuki Inoue and Akihiro Doi predicted that electrons in the plasma surrounding black holes would emit a special kind of light — called synchrotron radiation — as they exist together with the magnetic forces in the coronas.


Specifically, this radiation would be in the radio band, meaning light with a very long wavelength and low frequency. So the researchers decided to measure the coronal magnetic fields.


They looked at data from two active galaxies: IC 4329A, which is about 200 million light-years away, and NGC 985, which is approximately 580 million light-years away.


“We began by collecting measurements with ALMA, and then compared them to observations from two other radio telescopes: the VLA observatory in the United States, and the ATCA observatory in Australia, which measure slightly different bands,” the researchers said.


“We found indeed that there was an excess of radio emission originating from synchrotron radiation, in addition to emissions from the jets case out by the black holes.”


The coronal magnetic field of both objects is estimated to be 10 gauss on scales of 40 Schwarzschild radii (the radius of a black hole from which not even light can escape) from the central black holes. This magnetic field strength is weaker than the prediction from the magnetically heated corona scenario.


“The surprise is that although we confirmed the emission of radio synchrotron radiation from the coronas in both objects, it turns out that the field of the magnetic field we measured is much too weak to be able to drive the intense heating of the coronas around these black holes,” Dr. Inoue said.


“The same phenomenon was observed in both galaxies, implying that it could be a general phenomenon.”

 


Oh dear. Oh dear.  

 

This is a problem for the gnome believing mainstream.


But not the Electric Universe.


Just saying …

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Image result for space religion

 

 what does it all mean ?

 

we all know cats can not live in outer space

 

 looks like a big problem for the folks in Electric Universe

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7 hours ago, rrober49 said:

we all know cats can not live in outer space

 

 looks like a big problem for the folks in Electric Universe

 

Are you sure? I can't tell whether you're right or wrong because you didn't use

enormous bold font.

Because that's how you recognize truth, right?

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https://www.livescience.com/64379-dark-matter-discoveries-2019.html

 

Quote

 

2018 was a big year for dark matter.


As usual, astronomers didn't actually find any of the stuff, which is invisible to all our telescopes but appears to make up at least 80 percent of the universe by mass.


There were reports of a dark matter hurricane, but we can't actually see it. A galaxy was discovered that seemed not to have any dark matter, which oddly would have proved dark matter existed. But then it turned out that the galaxy may have dark matter after all — leaving the existence of dark matter in doubt for some physicists. Multiple experiments that were supposed to directly detect dark matter here on Earth turned up nothing.


So, where does that leave scientists hunting for dark matter as we head into 2019? Pretty optimistic, all things considered. The hunt for dark matter presses forward on all fronts.

 


LOL!   You’d think these *CLOWNS* would sooner or later wake up.  

 

Seventy years of negative results, with billions already spent on the search, and still NOTHING to show for it.  

 

They admit that.  

 

But then they keep coming back for more of YOUR money to continue the search.  

 

Look what they have planned now, folks …

 

Quote

 

From massive underground detectors to huge sky surveys, here are the five major steps in the hunt for dark matter to look forward to in 2019.

 

LIGO comes back online


The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the American detector that directly observed the first gravitational waves in 2015, will begin its third observation run in early 2019, collecting more data than ever before after a series of upgrades to its equipment.

 

So what's a gravitational-wave detector doing in an article about dark matter? It turns out that there are a lot of tantalizing possibilities for uncovering hints of dark matter using gravitational-wave data — though none of them have yet been realized.

 

Researchers in 2018 proposed that if a "dark photon" with a very slight mass lurks somewhere in the universe, its signal might turn up in LIGO data, causing very specific irregularities in the signatures of gravitational waves.

 

“We show that both ground-based and future space-based gravitational wave detectors have the capability to make a [conclusive dark matter] discovery,” the researchers wrote.

With LIGO back online, turning up evidence for dark matter in gravitational-wave data is very much a live possibility.

 


Yeah … right.  :rolleyes:

 

Quote

 

Physicists will try to figure out whether MiniBooNE gave up the ghost of a neutrino


Throughout 2018, scientists chattered excitedly about intriguing results from an experiment at Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory, called MiniBooNE, suggesting the presence of particles that shouldn't exist. The best explanation so far is that there's a fourth, as-yet-undiscovered neutrino out there, called the sterile neutrino, that interacts with the rest of the universe even less than its other neutrino cousins.


Some researchers believe that the sterile neutrino could be a candidate particle for dark matter, and as 2018 comes to a close, physicists are firming up their perspectives on this anomaly. Look for scientists thinking in new ways about that data and sterile neutrinos in general in 2019.

 


Bet this is going to cost a bundle (and send their kids to college) …  B)

 

Quote

 

First light at the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)


There's a telescope being built in Chile that will make detailed images of vast regions of the sky every 15 seconds, completing a full scan of the sky every three days. Over the course of 10 years, it will compare those images to one another again and again to track how the sky shifts and changes, providing the most in-depth-ever resource for understanding how dark matter pushes and pulls on the cosmos.

 

Scientists know, broadly, that dark matter shapes the way galaxies and their stars move and interact with one another. LSST's goal is to fill out that picture, offering an unprecedented level of detail on how the cosmos functions. That should offer astrophysicists a wealth of data on the nature of dark matter and the role it plays in the universe.

And in 2019, for the first time, researchers will open the 6,200-lb.(2,800 kilograms) eye of that telescope and take in light. Science operations begin in 2022.

 


Bet all they find is more helically wound plasma filaments … WHICH THEY'LL BASICALLY IGNORE.  :angry2:

 

Quote

 

The race to build a next-generation detector will heat up


Particle physicists have speculated for a long time that the first direct sign of dark matter might be a sparkle. Here's how it might work: As dark matter collides with inert substances in very dark rooms, those substances would emit faint specks of light. For decades, scientists have built detectors according to this principle, but so far, none have produced a conclusive result.


In 2019, scientists in China will be hard at work on the PandaX platform, which stares at xenon all day and night looking for a twinkle. Those scientists are rapidly upgrading the detector to accommodate a 4-ton (3.6 tonnes) xenon target, reporting that they expect to complete most of that work over the course of 2019 and 2020. The new detector will be called PandaX-xt.


Not to be outdone, researchers in South Dakota will be completing the most important phases of construction on LUX-ZEPLIN, which will observe a full 10 tons (9 tonnes) of xenon nearly a mile under the town of Lead, South Dakota. Like PandaX-xt, the project will likely not wrap up until 2020.


Italy will also move forward on upgrading its detector, appropriately named XENON, to an 8-ton (7.2 tonne) scale. The upgrade, called XENON-nt, should be wrapped up in 2019.

 


You can almost hear it!


money-down-toilet.jpg

 


Oh ... by the way ... here's one more thing we can expect in 2019 ...

 

rrober49 and laripu will continue to defend this waste.

 

Just saying ...

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Not sure what to think Beachooser but explain this !

 

Image result for cat cloud

 

 I think we can both agree that cloud looks awfully familiar ? Hmmmmm

 

Image result for cat bacon space

 

 

      looks like the cat is out of the bag now !

 

 

                            < insert your own snarky dig here >

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