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Dark Matter Even More Missing Now ...

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Isn't it that TV show (series) with Jodelle Ferland? Something about how they all wake up on some spaceship and forget who they are and how they got there?

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Oh oh … a new problem for the black hole gnome cultists …

 

http://www.astronomy.com/news/2017/12/astronomers-might-need-to-rethink-the-way-black-holes-form-jets

 

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Astronomers might need to rethink the way black holes form jets

 

The first precise measurements of a black hole’s magnetic field find it lacking the power to launch material at near-light speed.

 

Black holes are known for their extreme behavior — in particular, the high-speed jets of matter they launch into space. These jets have long fascinated astronomers, who believe they are associated with the black hole’s magnetic field. But new measurements of the magnetic field around a black hole have found that it’s surprisingly weak — which means astronomers may need to rethink the mechanism behind the jets. 

 

The measurements were taken by a team of astronomers from the University of Florida (UF) with the Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), a 10.4-meter telescope in the Canary Islands and the current record-holder as the world’s largest single-aperture telescope. Using CIRCE, an infrared camera built by UF for the massive GTC, they observed jet activity from V404 Cygni, a nine-solar-mass black hole about 8,000 light-years away, during a burst in jet activity in 2015 that lasted just a few weeks. Their results, published in Science earlier this month, are the first precision measurements of a black hole’s magnetic field ever taken — and they show that V404 Cygni has a magnetic field about 400 times weaker than expected. 

 

That poses a challenge for the theories currently used to explain the jets as a result of interactions between the black hole’s magnetic field and matter in its accretion disk — the swirling disk of gas and dust created as matter is trapped by the black hole’s gravity and falls inward. This disk lies outside the event horizon, rendering it visible to astronomers and allowing them to spot the black hole via its light. “Our surprisingly low measurements will force new constraints on theoretical models that previously focused on strong magnetic fields accelerating and directing the jet flows,” said UF professor and study co-author Stephen Eikenberry in a press release. “We weren't expecting this, so it changes much of what we thought we knew.”

 

 

 

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http://earthsky.org/space/filament-image-milky-way-black-hole-sgra

 

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Filament points to Milky Way black hole

 

1-cosmicfilame.jpg


The bright source near the bottom of this image, Sagittarius A* – pronounced Sagittarius A-star – is thought to be the location of the supermassive black hole at the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. See the filament appearing to point toward it? The filament might be caused by high-speed particles kicked away from the black hole, or it might be something even stranger. Image via NSF/ VLA/ UCLA/ M. Morris et al./ CfA.


One of the most mysterious and interesting known locations in our neighborhood of space is the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. It’s thought to contain a supermassive black hole, with a mass of some 4 million suns. Astronomers call this region and its possible black hole Sagittarius A* (aka Sgr A*, pronounced Sagittarius A-star). In 2016, Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University reported his discovery of an unusual filament in this region. The filament is about 2.3 light-years long and appears to curve around the site of the black hole. Now, another team of astronomers has employed a new technique to obtain a high-quality image of the curved filament. These astronomers said their new image supports the idea that the filament is pointing toward the black hole. The new image has led to some fascinating speculations as to the nature of this mystery filament.

 

A paper describing the new image – and astronomers ideas based upon it – was published in the December 1, 2017 issue of the peer-reviewed Astrophysical Journal Letters.

 

Mark Morris of the University of California, Los Angeles, led the imaging study. He said in a December 20, 2017 statement from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA):

 

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With our improved image, we can now follow this filament much closer to the galaxy’s central black hole, and it is now close enough to indicate to us that it must originate there. However, we still have more work to do to find out what the true nature of this filament is.

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers have considered three possible explanations for the filament:

 

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The first is that it is caused by high-speed particles kicked away from the supermassive black hole. A spinning black hole coupled with gas spiraling inwards can produce a rotating, vertical tower of magnetic field that approaches or even threads the event horizon, the point of no return for infalling matter. Within this tower, particles would be sped up and produce radio emission as they spiral around magnetic field lines and stream away from the black hole.

 

The second, more fantastic, possibility is that the filament is a cosmic string, theoretical, as-yet undetected objects that are long, extremely thin objects that carry mass and electric currents. 


Previously, theorists had predicted that cosmic strings, if they exist, would migrate to the centers of galaxies. If the string moves close enough to the central black hole it might be captured once a portion of the string crosses the event horizon.

 

The final option is that the position and the direction of the filament aligning with the black hole are merely coincidental superpositions, and there is no real association between the two. This would imply it is like dozens of other known filaments found farther away from the center of the galaxy. However, such a coincidence is quite unlikely to happen by chance.

 

 

Each of the scenarios being investigated would provide intriguing insight if proven true. The scientists’ statement continued:

 

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For example, if the filament is caused by particles being ejected by Sgr A*, this would reveal important information about the magnetic field in this special environment, showing that it is smooth and orderly rather than chaotic.

 

The second option, the cosmic string, would provide the first evidence for a highly speculative idea with profound implications for understanding gravity, space-time and the Universe itself.

 

Evidence for the idea that particles are being magnetically kicked away from the black hole would come from observing that particles further away from Sgr A* are less energetic than those close in. A test for the cosmic string idea will capitalize on the prediction by theorists that the string should move at a high fraction of the speed of light. Follow-up observations with the VLA should be able to detect the corresponding shift in position of the filament.

 

Even if the filament is not physically tied to Sgr A*, the bend in the shape of this filament is still unusual. The bend coincides with, and could be caused by, a shock wave, akin to a sonic boom, where the blast wave from an exploded star is colliding with the powerful winds blowing away from massive stars surrounding the central black hole.

 

 

Co-author Miller Goss, from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, New Mexico, said:

 

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We will keep hunting until we have a solid explanation for this object. And we are aiming to next produce even better, more revealing images.

 

Bottom line: Astronomers have obtained a new image of the 2.3-light-year-long filament that curves around Sagittarius A*, the region of our galaxy thought to contain a supermassive black hole.

 


No, the bottom line is that these astrophysicists and astronomers continue to be stuck on stupid.   Because there’s another explanation that’s been out there since the late 1970s.   In 1978 and 1981, in papers titled “Interstellar Clouds and The Formation of Stars” and “Cosmic Plasma” (see http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-iarticle_query?1978Ap%26SS..55..487A&defaultprint=YES&filetype=.pdf and https://books.google.com/books?id=gAnvCAAAQBAJ&pg=PR3&lpg=PR3&dq="cosmic+Plasma"+alfven&source=bl&ots=bXenSUpaJZ&sig=6PrB7GVoXiSZ3Bjctckr_rf2Htc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CDUQ6AEwBDgKahUKEwjD44eajMHIAhVSMogKHSruCgg#v=onepage&q="cosmic Plasma" alfven&f=false ),  Hannes Alfvén and Per Carlqvist theorized solar and galactic models.    They drew a circuit for each that was really just a scaled up version of the homopolar motor that Michael Faraday invented.  

 

As far as galaxies are concerned, they said that galactic discs behave like the conductive plates in a homopolar motor. Birkeland currents flow within the galactic disks, powering their stars. The galaxies are, in turn, powered by intergalactic Birkeland currents that are detectable by the radio signals they induce.    Galaxies occur when two intergalactic current carrying plasma filaments interact and wind themselves helically together thus jump starting a homopolar generator with a plasmoid at the center where all the current flowing as a result of the rotating magnetic fields is concentrated, releasing vast amounts of energy as the system further collapses due to gravity.   As Eric Lerner wrote in his landmark 1980s book, 

 

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“the energy taken from rotation and gravitational contraction of the object will go into the creation of the dense plasmoid and will be released in the beams the plasmoids create as they decay.   A quasar is thus the birth cry of a galaxy, the means by which the excess energy of rotation, which must be removed if the galaxy is to collapse, is carried away in the form of the energetic jets.  Once the galaxy forms, the same process at a lower rate rules the repetitive formation of small plasmoids at its nucleus.   The process is today generation stars in the dense filaments of the spiral arms.   The theory can explain the source of a quasar’s immense power.   The ultimate source is the rotational energy of an entire galaxy, augmented by the gravitational energy released as the galaxy contracts.   This energy is converted to electrical power by the disk-generator action and concentrated in the smaller filaments moving toward the galaxy core.  The filament pinches into a plasmoid that, for the largest quasars, might be a hundred light years across.   The visible quasar, though, is far smaller.   This is the region, a light-year or so wide, where each individual sub filament that composes the plasmoid is bursting apart as it radiates its energy and powers the emitted jets.  Just as a hydroelectric dam draws power from the water falling in a river valley, the quasar is drawing energy immediately from the plasmoid’s magnetic field, a million times larger in volume, and ultimately from the entire galaxy.   In this way the energy gained by the collapse of the galaxy is expelled as electrical energy in the quasar jets.   Without the elimination of this energy, the galaxy would never form at all.”

 

Now that was written at a time when most astrophysicists were still denying that there were large intergalactic current carrying plasma filaments (which we now know is true).   At a time when they were denying that there were large current carrying filaments inside galaxies.    The mainstream astrophysics journals rejected Lerner’s scientific papers on this subject, dismissing the analogy between galaxies and plasma focuses (which were being tested in labs at the time by the way) as absurd.  Only when his papers were resubmitted to a small plasma physics journal did they get published.   Here’s one of those papers:   http://bigbangneverhappened.org/Magnetic Self Compression No 1.pdf  .   You can clearly see how prescient Lerner (and Alfven, et al) were ... and how blind the mainstream astrophysics community has been for almost 40 years now.   

 

Remember my earlier discussion of the Fermi Bubbles?  They were described by mainstream astrophysicists as “colossal magnetized fountains of gamma-ray emitting gas spewing from the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Remember, here’s what the magnetic field in the region of these bubbles look like:

 

nature11734-f3.2.jpg
(From http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v493/n7430/fig_tab/nature11734_F3.html

 

The orientation of the magnetic fields seems to fit that of the homopolar model.   As the mainstream astronomers admitted ( http://www.space.com/19099-milky-way-galaxy-giant-geysers.html ), “the galactic halo ‘was supposed to be a quiet place,’ Carretti said.  ‘We now know it is continuously fueled with a massive amount of energy.  These cone-shaped outflows have denser ridges corkscrewing around their surfaces much like strings of lights wrapped around Christmas trees.   These ridges are about 13,000 to 16,000 light years long and 1,000 light years wide.”  Aren’t they in fact describing the magnetic field configuration of the homopolar motor postulated by Alfven et al?    

 

Mainstream scientific article after article (like this one, for example: http://www.space.com/19099-milky-way-galaxy-giant-geysers.html ) never mention plasma or electromagnetic phenomena.  It’s all gravity and dark matter as far as they are concerned … as if those are the only things that *matter* in a universe composed almost entirely of plasma and ubiquitous electrical phemonena.   And they always refer to plasma as “gas”, even though the two are not the same thing.  They talk about the “gas” being magnetized even though “gases” are not easily magnetized because “gases” are neutral.  What’s magnetized is plasma (by electric current) and if these scientists and science reporters can’t get something this basic right, what else do they have wrong?    

 

In the above linked article, the lead author (Ettore Carretti) described “colossal magnetized fountains of gamma-ray emitting gas” “spewing from the center of the Milky Way galaxy”.  He said “These findings tell us there is transport of a massive amount of energy and strong magnetic fields from the galactic center to the outskirts of the galaxy.”  Isn’t that EXACTLY what Alfven, et al, described?  Doesn't that "gas" look like it's moving along the field lines that Alfven predicted way back then?   Carretti goes on to say “It is an interaction we did not know about” … to which I’d say … why the hell not?   Plasma cosmologists have been describing it and it’s cause for more nearly FOUR DECADES.   Did Carretti and the rest of the mainstream astrophysics community just ignore everything Alfven, Peratt, Lerner and others published during that time … all the conferences that were held discussing their work?

 

Quoting Eric Lerner again, Alfvén theorized that 
 

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a galaxy, spinning in the magnetic fields of intergalactic space, generates electricity, as any conductor does when it moves through a magnetic field (the same phenemenon is at work in any electric generator).  The huge electrical current produced by the galaxy flows in great filamentary spirals toward the center of the galaxy, where it turns and flows out along the spin axis.  This galactic current then short-circuits, driving a vast amount of energy into the galactic core.   The galaxy “blows a fuse”: powerful electrical fields are created in the nucleus which accelerate intense jets of electrons and ions out along the axis.

 

You don’t need black holes to produce jets, folks.  Plasmoids can.   It’s not a black hole at the center of our galaxy, folks.  It’s a plasmoid.    And Tony Peratt, the plasma physicist I’ve mentioned previously, proved long ago, using the latest computer simulations available back then, that what Alfven theorized would happen if galaxy sized filaments of current (the sort that have been observed) interacted.  He proved they’d form, as Alfven predicted, a rotating galaxy like structure from which bursts of intense radiation (quasar level) would be periodically emitted in jet like fashion before settling down into ordinary galaxy like structures.    The evidence that there’s a plasmoid at the center of our galaxy has been staring astrophysicists in the face for 30 years.   Here’s a photo looking down the axis of a plasma focus device in a lab:
 
focus_barrel.jpg
 
At the center is the plasmoid with the magnetic plasma filaments streaming from it.  The filaments pinch together, forming a dense, magnetically-confined, hot spot or plasmoid that emits copious amounts of energy.   Now here’s the structure at the center of our galaxy:
 
gcradio_arc_vla.jpg 
 
It shows filamentary “power lines” feeding the plasmoid at the core.  Imaging yourself looking down the axis.  No strange physics, or strange matter, or singularities are involved in a plasma focus device in the lab … nor are they needed to explain what we see out there in the universe.  Matter (PLASMA, not “gas”) in the vicinity of the galactic center is under the control of powerful electromagnetic forces. Gravitational calculations may even be inappropriate and misleading under those conditions. During the time that energy is being stored in the central plasmoid, the galactic center is quiescent.  Jets are only produced when the plasmoid becomes unstable.  Just as we observe when looking out into the universe.   The periodic outbursts from a galactic plasmoid can briefly release more energy than all of the stars in the galaxy.  No need to be surprised like Carretti was about the amount of energy being released.    No need to look to Dark Matter or Black Holes or cosmic strings to explain what we see out there.   Just ordinary physics.      But rather than look at something as mundane as electricity as an explanation, modern astrophysicists immediately dive of the cliff and suggest old gnomes (black holes) or new gnomes (a “cosmic string”).   You might laugh at these idiots if they weren't wasting not only their own time (and lives), but millions if not billions of OUR dollars … as well as stifling real scientific progress.  They still don’t even understand our own sun.   Think how our lives might be improved if they did?   But there again, to do so the astrophysicists will likely have to consider theories involving electrical circuits and double layers …  not gnomes.  Unfortunately, they show no indication of doing that either.   So here we are ... 


 

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Here’s a great image of the center of our galaxy produced by radio telescopes …

 

center.JPG

(Combined radio image from the Very Large Array and Green Bank Telescope.)

 

The *object* known as Radio Arc is described by mainstream astronomers as “hot plasma flowing along lines of magnetic field”.    Now you’d think that would be a clue for mainstream astrophysicists as to what’s going on in the core since the current model can't really explain it.      The items identified as NRFs are non-thermal radio filaments … meaning that they are radiating energy which is not emitted in a thermal pattern.   The radio waves being detected are strong evidence of electrons and magnetic fields.  In most cases in astrophysics, non-thermal radio emission is synchrotron radiation and synchrotron radiation is more efficiently produced by electrical mechanisms than by other means    In fact, to explain what they see here, the mainstream has had to resort to the gnome of dark matter as the source.   Unfortunately, dark matter still hasn't been found even after half a century and billions of dollars of searching.    In contrast, plasma cosmologists need only point to known physics … such as z-pinches and plasmoids … which can be demonstrated in labs here on earth ... to explain the Radio Arc and NRFs.    While big bang, dark matter, black hole, dark energy, gnome believing astrophysicists can’t really explain the origin of NRFs, in the electric universe, NRFs are in fact predicted.    These filaments are Birkeland Currents.   They are the transmission lines that are feeding electric energy into star-forming regions and the galactic center.  They are the cause of star formation, not an after effect. It’s no coincidence that ALL star-forming regions have similar filaments (and to think the mainstream once denied the ubiquity of filaments). And the majority of these filaments are not observable in normal light. But in a few places, such as the region near the galactic core, electric power is concentrated enough that the currents literally glow. THIS is the alternative that the mainstream should now be spending money to look at … not cosmic strings and black holes … but they remain stuck on stupid.   :wacko:

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axion_Dark_Matter_Experiment

 

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The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle originally postulated to solve the strong CP problem. The axion is also an extremely attractive dark matter candidate. 

 

But oh dear …

 

https://phys.org/news/2018-01-bound-axions.html

 

Looks like the possibility that dark matter is comprised of axions just keeps getting dimmer and dimmer.   

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A new desperation gnome invented by the priests of Dark Matter ...

 

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/clumps-dark-matter-could-be-lurking-undetected-our-galaxy

 

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Clumps of dark matter could be lurking undetected in our galaxy

 

A hypothetical ‘dark’ force could allow clouds of invisible particles to collapse into small structures

 

Clumps of dark matter may be sailing through the Milky Way and other galaxies.

 

Typically thought to form featureless blobs surrounding entire galaxies, dark matter could also collapse into smaller clumps — similar to normal matter condensing into stars and planets — a new study proposes. Thousands of collapsed dark clumps could constitute 10 percent of the Milky Way’s dark matter, researchers from Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., report in a paper accepted in Physical Review Letters.

 

… snip …

 

To collapse, dark matter would need a way to lose energy, slowing particles as gravity pulls them into the center of the clump, so they can glom on to one another rather than zipping right through. In normal matter, this energy loss occurs via electromagnetic interactions. But the most commonly proposed type of dark matter particles, weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, have no such way to lose energy.

 

Buckley and DiFranzo imagined what might happen if an analogous “dark electromagnetism” allowed dark matter particles to interact and radiate energy. The researchers considered how dark matter would behave if it were like a pared-down version of normal matter, composed of two types of charged particles — a dark proton and a dark electron. Those particles could interact — forming dark atoms, for example — and radiate energy in the form of dark photons, a dark matter analog to particles of light.

 

 

They know they are in trouble and are grasping at straws.  

 

And isn't it ironic?  

 

Th priests have constantly resisted the idea that ordinary electromagnetism plays a huge role in the formation and behavior of planets, stars and galaxies.  

 

But "dark electromagnetism"?    

 

No problem ...

 

:rolleyes:

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Here’s a new announcement …

 

https://phys.org/news/2018-02-emission-centre-galaxy-serpentine.html

 

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Emission from the centre of a galaxy has a serpentine shape

 

An international group of scientists led by members of the National Instituto of Astrophysics (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino (INAF-OATo) has discovered a peculiar spiral-shaped blazar jet with many twists. The results of these observations are published today in Nature magazine.

 

A blazar is an astronomical object within an elliptical galaxy occupied by a central supermassive black hole that emits jets of radiation and particles with high energy. When these are directed towards the Earth, astronomers can detect them. They are among the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

 

In the second half of last year, the blazar CTA 102, which is 7,600 million light years from Earth, brightened considerably, drawing the attention of all the astronomers who specialise in this kind of object. The peak emission was detected on December 28th when it was 3,500 times greater than the brightness minima observed in previous years. This event was so exceptional that for a few days, this object was the brightest blazar ever observed.


… snip …

 

The researchers' interpretation is that the jet is "serpentine and inhomogeneous" because it emits radiation over a range of frequencies and from different zones, which change their orientation due to the instabilities in the jet, or to orbital motions.

 

… snip … 

 

”Three-dimensional numerical simulations, taking into account the magnetohydrodynamic properties and the relativistic velocities, predict the appearance and the propagation of instabilities in the jet, which then distort it," explains Acosta. "In addition, the images obtained by radio-interferometry show on scales of one parsec (some three light years) that the jet appears to be helical, and contains many vórtices. The picture that emerges is one of a twisting jet whose emission is amplified at different wavelengths at different times, by the lighthouse effect." The orientation in December 2016 was especially favourable for the extraordinary amplification observed.

 


Gee … a HELICAL jet.  

 

You’d think that at least one astrophysicist would have thought … hey … a Birkeland current?

 

But no … still Stuck On Stupid.

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Time for a new gnome since none of the old gnomes seem to be solving their problem  …

 

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2160861-dark-matter-could-be-produced-by-twisted-gravitational-waves/

 

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Dark matter could be produced by twisted gravitational waves

 

No, make that two new gnomes …

 

http://www.newsweek.com/physics-can-dark-matter-cool-thousands-clumps-hot-galactic-halos-797546

 

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PHYSICS: CAN DARK MATTER COOL? THOUSANDS OF 'CLUMPS' MIGHT EXIST OUTSIDE HOT GALACTIC HALOS

 

 

They call these clumps "nuggets".  

 

:rolleyes:

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Dr. Donald Scott, an electrical engineer, has developed a model that eliminates the need for "dark matter" to explain galaxy rotation curves:



 

http://www.ptep-online.com/2018/PP-53-01.PDF

PP-53-01.PDF

 



In this video clip, Dr Scott explains the paper and findings:



 

 

This is a shot across the bow of mainstream astrophysics.

 

They ignore it at their peril.
 

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This is sooooo funny (and so sad) …

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/02/28/588833582/did-dark-matter-make-the-early-universe-chill-out

 

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Scientists have probed a period of the universe's early history that no one has been able to explore before — and they got a surprise: It was far colder in the young universe, before the first stars blinked on, than astronomers previously thought.

 

What's more, that cosmic chill may have come from previously unknown interactions between normal matter and mysterious, so-called dark matter, according to two new reports in the journal Nature.

 

 

So the mainstream astrophysics community is going to call on the All Powerful Great Gnome, Dark Matter, to solve yet another problematic observation.    

 

These people have no shame … none at all.

 

The get yet another experimental result that CONTRADICTS their LCDM theory and instead of questioning the theory, they add another card to the house of cards.

 

And what’s really funny is that they’ve *discovered* that 180 million years after the Big Bang (Gnome #1), the universe was already half it’s predicted temperature according to their models.  YET, we’re to believe that the CMB today is *exactly* the right temperature according to those models.     We’re supposed to believe dark matter is dark because it doesn’t interact with light or ordinary matter now, but also supposed to believe that it did interact  with ordinary matter way back when in order to explain this new observation.  

 

The invent gnomes to support gnomes to support gnomes to support gnomes.  

 

THAT is what modern astrophysics has become.

 

You see the problems with modern astrophysics, folks?

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https://phys.org/news/2018-03-frustrating-fascinating-world-dark.html

 

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It's not that dark matter lies waiting to be discovered. Far from it, dark matter as a phenomenon is firmly established, and we have plenty of convincing evidence to suggest that it is five times more abundant than its bright counterpart.

 


LIARS.   Mainstream astrophysicists and the media that support them are just as shameless a liars as AGWalarmists and the media that support them.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-03/uoh-usi031518.php

 

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UH scientists investigating mysterious dark matter

 

… snip …

 

DarkSide-20k (DS-20k) is currently being constructed using similar components from the present DarkSide experiment. Whereas DS-50 holds about 9.5 gallons (50 kilograms) of low-radioactivity liquid argon, this new detector, DS-20k, will employ new readout technology and will be some 400 times larger, holding 3,800 gallons (20,000 kilograms) of liquid argon. The new experiment is expected to start acquiring data at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in 2021.

 

 

Another $ 65 MILLION euros headed down the drain?

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https://www.space.com/39577-rotating-galaxy-group-raises-questions.html

 

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Galaxies Rotate in Sync, Raising Dark Matter Questions

 

The universe is filled with galaxies, and often a large galaxy like our own will have several smaller ones orbiting it. Astronomers looked at one particular group of galaxies and noticed their circling was a bit too orderly for current models to explain.


Most scientists' understanding of our universe includes a substance called dark matter, which accounts for 80 percent of the matter in the universe. Dark matter was first hypothesized in order to account for the rotation of galaxies, which didn't seem to have enough conventional matter to keep them from flying apart like a smoothie in a lidless blender. Dark matter provides the extra stuff needed to keep galaxies together and was likely involved in galaxy formation. Dark matter appears to be cobwebbed across the universe. Scientist suspect that dwarf galaxies form along these dark matter threads and converge where they meet, merging into larger galaxies.


Under this framework, satellite galaxies should be distributed randomly around their host, following elongated orbits in arbitrary directions. This assumption was challenged when scientists found that satellites of our own Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxy, our closest major neighbor, don't follow this prediction. The small companion galaxies appear to rotate in sync with each other, following fairly circular paths in a disk-shaped plane around their host galaxy.


"These two distributions could not be more different," Stacy McGaugh, an expert in cosmologic modeling at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, told Space.com.


Now scientists have found a third example of a highly ordered satellite system. In 2015, group of astronomers found that most of the dwarf galaxies orbiting the large galaxy Centaurus A did so in a plane perpendicular to the galaxy's disk. After hearing of this, a team of astronomers led by the University of Basel looked at the individual satellite galaxies circling Centaurus A, which is the richest assembly of galaxies within 30 million light-years of the Milky Way, according to the study. By tracking the positions and velocities of the satellites, the team discovered that 14 of the 16 companions orbit Centaurus A in the same direction. The latest findings were detailed Feb. 1 in the journal Science.


"A statistical outlier will happen once or twice," the University of Basel's Oliver Müller, lead author on the new work, told Space.com. "So we would expect that we find stuff by pure chance such as this. But if we find three of those systems close to each other, and every galaxy group has a .1 percent chance to exist [in such a well-ordered state] … then what is the probability of that?"


McGaugh, who was not involved with the study, agrees that the observation is a cause for concern for the current model. "It's not just a quibble," he said. "It's the third of three, [and] we haven't seen one that behaves right."


When it comes to satellite galaxies, "you can drop them in from afar or spin them out," McGaugh said. One way to produce these organized systems in the current model is to assume that the dwarf galaxies all formed elsewhere in space and fell into orbit around the host galaxy at the same time. This is, however, unlikely, McGaugh said.


Alternatively, they might have formed more recently, from interactions between nearby galaxies tugging on each other like the moon tugs on the Earth, raising the ocean to create tides. If this were the case, material might swirl off a galaxy, coalesce into a dwarf galaxy and begin to orbit its host. These tidal dwarf galaxies would naturally orbit in the plane of interaction between the two larger galaxies, and would likely circle in the same direction, Müller said. 


Unfortunately, such a scenario is highly unlikely in the prevailing model, McGaugh said. It is likely under a competing model of the universe, but this rival has other drawbacks. "Sometimes, the best current answer is, 'We don't know,'" McGaugh said.

 


What’s sad is that NONE of these *scientists* see the obvious.

 

It's been starring them in the face for 50 years.

 

Just saying …

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Is the dam finally breaking?  

 

Eric Lerner just had a peer-reviewed paper published by the Royal Astronomical Society 

 

https://academic.oup.com/mnras/advance-article/doi/10.1093/mnras/sty728/4951333

 

and

 

https://arxiv.org/abs/1803.08382

 

It’s titled “Observations contradict galaxy size and surface brightness predictions that are based on the expanding universe hypothesis” and it threatens the very foundation of the Big Bang Theory … the expanding universe.   It demonstrates SERIOUS problems with the mainstream model given observations about galaxy size at extreme distances.   The problem is that they are observing fully formed galaxies at distances where their theory says there should be ONLY baby ones.   This results points not to an expanding universe but a static one with non-doppler redshift.   Mind you, this has been published in a major astronomical publication.  That makes me think the mainstream knows they have a serious problem now and it might be an indication that they are about to move towards admitting it.    Stay tuned ….

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More bad news for Dark Matter proponents …


https://www.space.com/40119-ghostly-galaxy-almost-no-dark-matter.html “Defying Theories, This Ghostly Galaxy Has Almost No Dark Matter”


https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/astronomers-boggle-at-a-distant-galaxy-devoid-of-dark-matter/ “Astronomers Boggle at a Distant Galaxy Devoid of Dark Matter”


https://www.sciencealert.com/galaxy-ncg1052-df2-no-dark-matter-ultra-diffuse-dragonfly-array “We Just Discovered a Galaxy Without Dark Matter, And Astronomers Are Freaking Out”

 

Well get a clue, finally ...

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https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/04/04/599437677/new-study-shows-the-center-of-the-milky-way-has-thousands-of-black-holes

 

Quote

 

Center Of The Milky Way Has Thousands Of Black Holes, Study Shows

 

The supermassive black hole lurking at the center of our galaxy appears to have a lot of company, according to a new study that suggests the monster is surrounded by about 10,000 other black holes.


… snip …


Isolated black holes are almost impossible to detect, but black holes that have a companion — an orbiting star — interact with that star in ways that allow the pair to be spotted by telltale X-ray emissions. The team searched for those signals in a region stretching about three light-years out from our galaxy's central supermassive black hole.

 


The problem with this conclusion is that something else produces X-rays.   A Bennet pinch (Z-pinch).   And Z-pinches form naturally in current carrying plasma filaments.

 

Plasma_Pinch_Mechanism.png

 

 


And they produce LOTS of x-rays.


In fact, pinches are used to generate x-rays in electromagnetic forming of metals.

 

Quote

"So we're looking at the very, very, very center of our galaxy. It's a place that's filled with a huge amount of gas and dust, and it's jammed with a huge number of stars," Hailey says.


And there is the problem wit the conclusion.   These so-called *scientists* STILL don’t appreciate that the center of the galaxy isn’t just filled with “gas” and “dust”.   It’s mostly filled with PLASMA.    And that being the case, it would be very surprising if x-ray producing z-pinches didn’t occur by the, perhaps, tens of thousands near the core.   It seems mainstream astrophysicists are just stuck on stupid.     Because not one of the articles on the supposed ten thousand black holes near the core that I could find mentions the word plasma.     Not a one ... even though we know that the region within 900 light years of the Milky Way’s core is crisscrossed with plasma filaments.   Just saying … B)

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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180405223407.htm

 

Quote

 

Dark matter might not be interactive after all


Astronomers are back in the dark about what dark matter might be, after new observations showed the mysterious substance may not be interacting with forces other than gravity after all. Dr Andrew Robertson of Durham University will today (Friday 6 April) present the new results at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.


Three years ago, a Durham-led international team of researchers thought they had made a breakthrough in ultimately identifying what dark matter is.


Observations using the Hubble Space Telescope appeared to show that a galaxy in the Abell 3827 cluster -- approximately 1.3 billion light years from Earth -- had become separated from the dark matter surrounding it.


Such an offset is predicted during collisions if dark matter interacts with forces other than gravity, potentially providing clues about what the substance might be.


The chance orientation at which the Abell 3827 cluster is seen from Earth makes it possible to conduct highly sensitive measurements of its dark matter.


However, the same group of astronomers now say that new data from more recent observations shows that dark matter in the Abell 3827 cluster has not separated from its galaxy after all. The measurement is consistent with dark matter feeling only the force of gravity.


Lead author Dr Richard Massey, in the Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, at Durham University, said: "The search for dark matter is frustrating, but that's science. When data improves, the conclusions can change.


"Meanwhile the hunt goes on for dark matter to reveal its nature.


"So long as dark matter doesn't interact with the Universe around it, we are having a hard time working out what it is."

 


LOL!

 

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/dark-matter-isnt-interacting-itself-after-all

 

Quote

 

Dark matter isn’t interacting with itself after all

 

… snip …


“We just know embarrassingly little about it,” says Massey. “We keep trying to take a step forward, and find ourselves going back to the beginning.”

 

 

LOL!   Gee … I wonder why?

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Still more bad news for the Big Bang gnome …


https://news.sky.com/story/galaxy-pile-up-set-to-radically-change-notions-about-the-early-universe-11346800

 

Quote

 

Galaxy pile-up set to radically change notions about the early universe


A pile-up of galaxies detected 12.4 billion light-years away from Earth looks set to radically change current thinking about the early universe.


The collision of 14 galaxies, which occurred more than 12 billion years ago has been detected 90% of the way across the observable cosmos.


In effect, astronomers have been able to look back in time to when the universe was about a tenth its current age and have recorded the formation of a galactic protocluster, a precursor to the type of enormous galaxy clusters that are the largest-known objects in today's universe.


Designated as SPT2349-56, the protocluster has a mass about 10 trillion times greater than our sun and according to conventional wisdom should not have existed until much later in the universe's formation.


It was observed from the Atacama telescope array in Chile.


Astrophysicist Scott Chapman of Dalhousie University in Canada said: "We were staggered by the implications.


"Yes, conventional wisdom was that clusters take a lot longer to build up and assemble. SPT2349 shows us it happened much more rapidly and explosively than simulations or theory suggested."

 

 

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Here’s some new data that’s likely been totally misinterpreted by Mainstream *astrophysicists* …

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180410132703.htm

 

Quote

 

Tiny distortions in universe's oldest light reveal strands in cosmic web


Researchers map the network of filaments connecting the universe's visible matter


Scientists have decoded faint distortions in the patterns of the universe's earliest light to map huge tubelike structures invisible to our eyes -- known as filaments -- that serve as superhighways for delivering matter to dense hubs such as galaxy clusters.

 

 

Keep in mind that it was decades ago that mainstream scientist were in denial about the existence of filaments like these … when Plasma Cosmologists had predicted them.   


Of course, these clueless mainstream authors now claim (with no uncertainty) that Dark Matter is what constitutes the filaments, not current carrying plasmas, like the Plasma Cosmologists had suggested (and still maintain).    And of course, you won’t find “plasma” or “electric currents ” mentioned in the article above, even though BOTH are quite likely present in these filaments (notice that the article indicates they’re made of “gases”, not plasma :rolleyes:).    Later, from the article …

 

Quote

"Filaments are this integral part of the cosmic web, though it's unclear what is the relationship between the underlying dark matter and the filaments," and that was a primary motivation for the study, said Simone Ferraro, one of the study's authors who is a Miller postdoctoral fellow at UC Berkeley's Center for Cosmological Physics.


LOL!   So it’s “unclear” what the relationship is between dark matter and filaments.  

 

Now that’s a mouthful, isn’t it, coming from people that express 100% certainly in a gnome that they’ve failed to identify even after more than 70 years of searching.  :rolleyes:   

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Yet another SHOCK for mainstream astrophysicists …


https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/962775/Monster-blackhole-bigger-Milky-Way-found-by-scientists

 

Quote

 

'MONSTER' blackhole 'BIGGER than the Milky Way' found by scientists in shocking discovery

 

Dr Christian Wolf of the ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics said: "This black hole is growing so rapidly that it's shining thousands of times more brightly than an entire galaxy.


“The heat radiation from the matter falling into the black hole, which is the light we see, is a few thousand times brighter than our own Milky Way galaxy.”


Researchers at the Australian National University discovered the supermassive black hole, also known as a quasar, when a telescope called Skymapper indicated that the object could have been of potential interest.


They then used data from the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite to determine its distance from Earth.


They found that it took more than 12billion years for the light from this massive black hole to reach Earth.


It is the brightest quasar that can be seen in visual or ultraviolet light.


It is also thought the object is no less than the size of 20billion of our suns.


"These large and rapidly-growing black holes are exceedingly rare, and we have been searching for them with SkyMapper for several months now.


"The European Space Agency's Gaia satellite, which measures tiny motions of celestial objects, helped us find the black hole,” Wolf said.


"We don't know how this one grew so large, so quickly in the early days of the Universe," he added.


Wolf noted that scientists are perplexed at how this black hole got so large, as its existence puts into question the established science on black holes.


"So, either black holes can grow faster than the speed limit, but we don't know how that works, and we have not seen it yet in action, or there is an unknown way to make 5000 solar mass black holes very close in time to the Big Bang," he said.

 


LOL!  

 

Never once do these idiots question their assumptions.  

 

Like assuming that red shift equates to distance (i.e., that nothing else can cause redshift even thought that assumption has been proven wrong already in the lab).  

 

Never once do these idiots consider the alternative offered by plasma cosmologists 30 years ago … when Peratt conducted super computer calculations using an electromagnetic model of plasma filled galaxies and produced jets from them with the energy output of observed quasars.  

 

There just no cure for stupidity like this, folks.  

 

No cure at all, apparently.
 

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