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  1. A very record breaking year in Alaska, as the climate keeps heating up and the ice keeps melting away. Baked Alaska indeed! Alaska, barren of sea ice, saw its hottest July in 125 years Grist (from The Guardian) By Oliver Milman Aug 10, 2019 A heat wave pulsating through the Arctic helped push Alaska to its warmest month ever recorded in July, with the state’s vast coastline left completely barren of sea ice. Alaska’s average temperature in July was a record 58.1 degrees F (14.5 degrees C), nearly 1 degree F above the previous monthly high set in July 2004, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Cities and towns across the vast U.S. state, such as Anchorage, Utqiaġvik (formerly known as Barrow), and Kodiak all had their warmest month in 125 years of record-keeping. This heat, 5.4 degrees F warmer than the long-term average for July, helped spur wildfires that shrouded much of Alaska in a pall of smoke and has now resulted in a remarkable melting away of shoreline ice. There is now no sea ice within 150 miles of Alaskan shores, according to an analysis by the National Weather Service. The pace of ice loss is “unprecedented” in 40 years of satellite records, scientists said, with the Bering Sea, which separates Alaska from Russia, left completely ice-free. The record-breaking warmth in Alaska is part of a broader heat wave that has swept the northern latitudes, with Greenland shedding a record 12.5 gigatons of ice into the ocean in a single day, Norway experiencing its joint hottest day ever, and forest fires in Siberia tearing through an area as large as Belgium. Scientists warned that the extreme conditions are consistent with the most pessimistic scenario where countries do little to constrain global heating by cutting planet-warming gases from cars, trucks, and power generation. “We are seeing record after record after record,” said Marco Tedesco, a climate scientist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, of the heat and melting episodes. “It looks like the worst case scenario put forward by the IPCC could be an underestimate because we are seeing ice melting now that we expected 30 to 40 years from now. It’s alarming because it’s very fast-paced and the consequences are hard to predict.” Arctic sea ice accumulates over winter before receding as temperatures start to rise in spring. The unusually hasty retreat of ice in 2019 has been prompted by persistent southerly winds, storms, and high temperatures roiling both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Across the Arctic, July set a new record low for sea ice extent, at 2.93 million square miles. “While we cannot directly connect one particular extreme year to climate change, the long-term trends are obvious — sea ice is declining and temperatures are rising,” said Zack Labe, a climate scientist at the University of California, Irvine. He added: “Without a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, climate change will continue to increase the probability of extreme heat waves around the world.” The Arctic is heating up at about twice the average of the rest of the world, with the frigid polar region caught in a spiral where sea ice thins and melts away, opening up vast tracts of dark ocean that is more absorbent of heat, causing further warming. The loss of ice causes numerous hazards for communities living in the Arctic, with many facing complete relocation. Meanwhile, the melting of glaciers in Greenland are a leading contributor to sea level rise that imperils coastal cities around the world via flooding. Tedesco said that the pace of melting in Greenland this year is on track to break a record set in 2012, when a net 562 gigatons of ice was lost. This will probably raise the global sea level by more than 1 millimeter. If Greenland’s entire ice sheet were to melt, the world’s oceans would rise by about 20 feet. “What’s happening in Greenland is exceptional and shows that the melting is not only increasing but accelerating,” said Tedesco. “There are still cascading events we still don’t fully understand. We will see impacts on society and life as we know it.” The unspooling of the Arctic’s environment will be just one consequence of global heating discussed at an upcoming U.N. climate summit in New York in September. Governments will meet amid growing alarm over heat waves, fierce storms, drought, and food insecurity that have wracked countries around the world. Such concerns have sparked a global protest movement, headed by young activists such as the teenager Greta Thunberg, who is sailing to New York on a solar-powered boat for the U.N. summit. “My concern is that Greenland will be forgotten because there will probably be a huge hurricane by then,” said Tedesco. “Momentum is gaining but there is clearly a strong need to take real action on this at a government level.”
  2. Actually, BigTurd, the confusion is all yours.....fostered by your denier cult puppetmasters. Amidst a long national warm spell and the beginning of Australia's Southern Hemisphere winter, a small part of the country that often gets colder temperatures at that time of the year, got a short cold spell that broke a few local low temperature records (big deal).....that is, almost by definition, WEATHER, temporary and passing. A long heatwave filled year, beginning with the start of Australia's summer in 2018, and continuing through 2019, with a great many broken high temperature records over pretty near the whole Continent, with the country on track to have its hottest, or possibly only second hottest, year on record, following a string of very unusually hot years, with nine of the ten hottest years on record in Australia happening since 2005.....THAT IS A CHANGING CLIMATE!!! The stunning chart revealing Australia's record-breaking run of rising temperatures The Sydney Morning Herald By Nicole Hasham January 10, 2019 (excerpts) If there was any question Australians are enduring a more extreme, topsy-turvy climate, look only to the month just gone. In early December, Cyclone Owen unloaded 678 millimetres of rain in one day on the tiny North Queensland town of Halifax. It was a new December daily rainfall record. By mid-December, a month's worth of rain fell in parts of Victoria in 24 hours. On December 20 it was Sydney’s turn when a monster thunderstorm dropped giant hail stones – some the size of cricket balls. The insurance bill is nearing $675 million. Then, the sun came out. By month’s end, much of Australia was baking under torrid temperatures. Marble Bar in Western Australia reached 49.3 degrees – the third-highest December temperature recorded anywhere in the country. The record-breaking events are outlined in the Bureau of Meteorology’s 2018 climate statement released on Thursday, which confirmed the nation experienced its third-warmest year on record in 2018. The bureau attributed the year of meteorological extremes to both climate change and natural variability. The national mean temperature in 2018 was 1.14 degrees above average. Nine of the 10 warmest years on record have occurred since 2005. [chart won't load here so go to website to see it] The bureau’s senior climatologist Lynette Bettio said every state and territory experienced above-average day and night temperatures last year. “The average maximum temperature for the country as a whole was particularly warm, sitting 1.55 degrees above the 1961-1990 average, making 2018 Australia's second warmest year on record for daily high temperatures,” Dr Bettio said. In August and September, up to 100 bushfires were active across NSW, Queensland and Victoria when warm, dry conditions brought an early start to the bushfire season. The report said Australia's climate “is increasingly influenced by global warming” and the nation has warmed by just over one degree since 1910. Most warming has occurred since 1950. “The background warming trend can only be explained by human influence on the global climate,” the bureau said.
  3. Nope! In the real world, Australia is having its hottest year on record so far in 2019. Australia swelters through its hottest month on record, with January mean temperature exceeding 30C - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Jan 31, 2019 · It's official: January 2019 was Australia's hottest-ever month on record going all the way back to 1910, according to the monthly climate review released by the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). It followed the hottest December on record for Australia — and there is no relief in sight for the months ahead. January was a truly record-breaking month across several fronts: the highest minimum, the highest maximum and the highest mean temperatures for Australia as a whole. The highest overnight minimum on record was broken multiple times with Wanaaring (Barrona Downs) in NSW currently holding the title at 36.6 degrees Celsius. The mean temperature for January averaged across the country exceeded 30C — the first time this had occurred in any month, the BOM said. ***** March was Australia's hottest on record, with temperatures 2C above average | Australia news | The Guardian Apr 1, 2019 · An abnormally hot summer in Australia ended with the warmest March on record, new data from the Bureau of Meteorology shows. The latest monthly climate breakdown shows that temperatures across Australia were 2.13C above the average throughout last month. “One of the standout features of March was there was above-average temperatures just about everywhere; more than 99% of the country,” Blair Trewin, a senior climatologist at the bureau told Guardian Australia. “This is still a very abnormal summer, when you break the record for the warmest first quarter by 0.9 of a degree, that’s not a small number. It’s been an unusually hot few months, the background warming trend we see in Australia is in the order of 0.1 to 0.2 of a degree per decade. Even in the climate of 2019 this is unusual, but is not as unusual as it would have been in say 1980 or 1950.” *****  Australia sees record temperatures for fourth month in a row - Phys.org Apr 1, 2019 · Australia continued a string of "hottest ever" months in March, the government said Monday. The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said the country had experienced the warmest March on record, with mean maximum and minimum temperatures above average for nearly all of the vast continent nation. BOM said the national mean temperature was 2.13 degrees centigrade (3.83 degrees Fahrenheit) above the long-term average for the month of March. It was the fourth month in a row of record heat in the country, and January was Australia's hottest month ever, with mean temperatures across the continent exceeding 30 degrees Celsius for the first time. ***** Australia in July 2019 Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology  In brief Warmer than average July for Australia Mean maximum temperature above average for nearly all of the country Mean minimum temperature above average for large areas, particularly the southeast; below average for some areas of the far north July rainfall below to very much below average for very large areas, including most of New South Wales, southern Queensland, South Australia, and the southern half of Western Australia Rainfall above average for western Tasmania, parts of northern Queensland and the Gulf Coast  It has been the second-warmest January–July on record for Australia (spanning 110 years), with rainfall also below to very much below average over most of the country, and fifth-lowest on record for Australia as a whole (spanning 120 years) Temperatures July was the fourth-warmest on record for Australia as a whole, with the national mean temperature 1.62 °C above average. The mean maximum temperature for the month was the third-highest on record for July, at 2.23 °C above average, while the mean minimum temperature was 1.01 °C above average.  The Northern Territory and all States except Tasmania and Victoria placed amongst the ten warmest Julys on record for mean maximum temperature, while mean minimum temperature for the month was amongst the ten warmest on record for Victoria and Tasmania. The seven months of the year to date has been very warm for the country as a whole; Australia observed its second-warmest mean temperature on record for January–July. The mean maximum and mean minimum temperature have also been very warm; respectively they were the highest and fifth-highest on record for Australia over the same period. Maximum temperatures were above to very much above average nearly all of Western Australia, with a near-average mean maximum temperature for July only observed over part of eastern Queensland extending from the Central Coast and adjacent inland areas up the eastern half and north of Cape York Peninsula. Mean maximum temperature for the month was very much above average (decile 10, in the highest 10% of historical observations) for much of the country, and warmest on record for a large area of northwestern to northern inland Western Australia, and areas in eastern New South Wales, extending into adjacent southeast Queensland.   The mean minimum temperature for the month was warmer than average for large parts of Australia, including the Victoria River and Barkly districts in the Northern Territory; the area south of the Gulf of Carpentaria, much of western Queensland and parts of the inland south, Central Highlands, and coastal southeast; most of New South Wales away from the central north and northeast; Victoria and Tasmania; the southeastern quarter of South Australia and the northwest of that State, continuing through central Western Australia and the Pilbara; and along the southwest and southern coast of Western Australia.  Cooler than average mean minimum temperatures were observed in much of the Top End of the Northern Territory, and also in small areas in the northern Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, and in Western Australia in the northern and western Kimberley, the central Gascoyne, and northern Goldfields districts.   A number of sites in Western Australia, New South Wales, and Queenslandobserved their highest July mean daily maximum temperature on record. A few sites in Victoria and South Australia also observed a record warm July mean maximum temperature.  A number of sites in South Australia, including Adelaide West Terrace / ngayirdapira, observed their highest July mean daily minimum temperature on record, as did some in Victoria.   Some sites in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and Western Australia observed their highest July mean temperature on record.
  4. Just more denier cult bullshyt and lies, Bullshyto. And BTW, moron, that graph said Arctic ice was declining at a rate of 7.32% per decade, not "per year". Every one of your moronic arguments against the well confirmed conclusions of the climate scientists is debunked here.....but of course you are much too brainwashed by rightwingnut propaganda pushers to handle having your cherished myths debunked....so I bet you will never even open up and look at #2, #51, & #73, for example, to see how badly you have been misled and duped. Arguments from Global Warming Skeptics and what the science really says
  5. You don't ever have any actual "facts", BigTurd. What little connection the things you say have to reality is mangled and distorted by your anti-science denier cult insanity into ridiculously biased nonsense. Australia is actually having one of its hottest years on record. As I just proved.
  6. Nutjob website that claims that "coming Grand Solar Minimum" will cause global cooling.....any day now .....just you wait. Nutty, fraudulent websites are all that the BigTurd ever has to support his deranged delusions and denier cult myths. Nope! That's about the last thing they've been doing this year down under, you malignant troll..... Australia swelters through its hottest month on record, with January mean temperature exceeding 30C - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Jan 31, 2019 · It's official: January 2019 was Australia's hottest-ever month on record going all the way back to 1910, according to the monthly climate review released by the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). It followed the hottest December on record for Australia — and there is no relief in sight for the months ahead. January was a truly record-breaking month across several fronts: the highest minimum, the highest maximum and the highest mean temperatures for Australia as a whole. The highest overnight minimum on record was broken multiple times with Wanaaring (Barrona Downs) in NSW currently holding the title at 36.6 degrees Celsius. The mean temperature for January averaged across the country exceeded 30C — the first time this had occurred in any month, the BOM said. ***** March was Australia's hottest on record, with temperatures 2C above average | Australia news | The Guardian Apr 1, 2019 · An abnormally hot summer in Australia ended with the warmest March on record, new data from the Bureau of Meteorology shows. The latest monthly climate breakdown shows that temperatures across Australia were 2.13C above the average throughout last month. “One of the standout features of March was there was above-average temperatures just about everywhere; more than 99% of the country,” Blair Trewin, a senior climatologist at the bureau told Guardian Australia. “This is still a very abnormal summer, when you break the record for the warmest first quarter by 0.9 of a degree, that’s not a small number. It’s been an unusually hot few months, the background warming trend we see in Australia is in the order of 0.1 to 0.2 of a degree per decade. Even in the climate of 2019 this is unusual, but is not as unusual as it would have been in say 1980 or 1950.” ***** Australia sees record temperatures for fourth month in a row - Phys.org Apr 1, 2019 · Australia continued a string of "hottest ever" months in March, the government said Monday. The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said the country had experienced the warmest March on record, with mean maximum and minimum temperatures above average for nearly all of the vast continent nation. BOM said the national mean temperature was 2.13 degrees centigrade (3.83 degrees Fahrenheit) above the long-term average for the month of March. It was the fourth month in a row of record heat in the country, and January was Australia's hottest month ever, with mean temperatures across the continent exceeding 30 degrees Celsius for the first time. ***** Australia in July 2019 Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology In brief Warmer than average July for Australia Mean maximum temperature above average for nearly all of the country Mean minimum temperature above average for large areas, particularly the southeast; below average for some areas of the far north July rainfall below to very much below average for very large areas, including most of New South Wales, southern Queensland, South Australia, and the southern half of Western Australia Rainfall above average for western Tasmania, parts of northern Queensland and the Gulf Coast It has been the second-warmest January–July on record for Australia (spanning 110 years), with rainfall also below to very much below average over most of the country, and fifth-lowest on record for Australia as a whole (spanning 120 years) Temperatures July was the fourth-warmest on record for Australia as a whole, with the national mean temperature 1.62 °C above average. The mean maximum temperature for the month was the third-highest on record for July, at 2.23 °C above average, while the mean minimum temperature was 1.01 °C above average. The Northern Territory and all States except Tasmania and Victoria placed amongst the ten warmest Julys on record for mean maximum temperature, while mean minimum temperature for the month was amongst the ten warmest on record for Victoria and Tasmania. The seven months of the year to date has been very warm for the country as a whole; Australia observed its second-warmest mean temperature on record for January–July. The mean maximum and mean minimum temperature have also been very warm; respectively they were the highest and fifth-highest on record for Australia over the same period. Maximum temperatures were above to very much above average nearly all of Western Australia, with a near-average mean maximum temperature for July only observed over part of eastern Queensland extending from the Central Coast and adjacent inland areas up the eastern half and north of Cape York Peninsula. Mean maximum temperature for the month was very much above average (decile 10, in the highest 10% of historical observations) for much of the country, and warmest on record for a large area of northwestern to northern inland Western Australia, and areas in eastern New South Wales, extending into adjacent southeast Queensland. The mean minimum temperature for the month was warmer than average for large parts of Australia, including the Victoria River and Barkly districts in the Northern Territory; the area south of the Gulf of Carpentaria, much of western Queensland and parts of the inland south, Central Highlands, and coastal southeast; most of New South Wales away from the central north and northeast; Victoria and Tasmania; the southeastern quarter of South Australia and the northwest of that State, continuing through central Western Australia and the Pilbara; and along the southwest and southern coast of Western Australia. Cooler than average mean minimum temperatures were observed in much of the Top End of the Northern Territory, and also in small areas in the northern Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, and in Western Australia in the northern and western Kimberley, the central Gascoyne, and northern Goldfields districts. A number of sites in Western Australia, New South Wales, and Queensland observed their highest July mean daily maximum temperature on record. A few sites in Victoria and South Australia also observed a record warm July mean maximum temperature. A number of sites in South Australia, including Adelaide West Terrace / ngayirdapira, observed their highest July mean daily minimum temperature on record, as did some in Victoria. Some sites in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and Western Australia observed their highest July mean temperature on record.
  7. Retarded drivel and denier cult lies! Too stupid to even bother debunking. Except for your really stupid Arctic sea ice lie. In the real world..... Figure 3. Monthly July ice extent for 1979 to 2019 shows a decline of 7.32 percent per decade. - Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center High-resolution image
  8. Maybe you are just a stupid ignorant anti-science retard, taipoooo. Or maybe a troll working for the Koch brothers or EXXON. Various natural factors moved the Earth's climate into ice ages and other natural factors moved the planet out of those ice ages. The only natural factors currently happening would be forcing the climate towards cooling, not warming, if it wasn't for the un-natural and very rapid 40% increase in CO2 (a powerful greenhouse gas) levels, largely caused by the burning of fossil fuels, that is causing the current abrupt global warming.
  9. "Duh" must be your motto, BattyPowder. Get a clue, moron. Alaska is melting and profoundly changing from the way it's been for thousands of years.
  10. That's what the residents of Alaska are saying this summer. NOAA Climate.gov › event-tracker High temperatures smash all-time records in Alaska in early July 2019 | NOAA Climate.gov Jul 16, 2019 · On July 4, all-time high temperature records were set in Kenai, Palmer, King Salmon, and Anchorage International Airport. The airport reached an astounding, for Alaska, 90°F, breaking the previous ...
  11. That's an incredibly retarded line that you just pulled out of your butthole, Bullshyto. A line no one else said or implied, you poor brain-damaged troll.
  12. Nope, you are the ignorant gullible fool here, Bullshyto. Almost all of Greenland was covered in thick ice or was rocky and barren. The Vikings found only some small marginally habitable bits of land along some of the southern fjords. The "warming period" was not global, just regional, and while it was a bit warmer in parts of Europe and North America, it was colder in the Pacific region and other places. Temperatures cooled again and Greenland got a little colder and the Viking settlement died out. More importantly, your myth is meaningless. Scientists now know that the Medieval Warm period was regional and not global and they know that it was not nearly as hot then as it is now as a result of human caused global warming. Your denier cult myth that the current warming is somwhow cyclic, with previous periods of global warming as large as the current warming happening only a thousand years ago, has been totally disproven. The Viking settlements on Greenland have no significance to the current rapid and abrupt global warming. That is, by far, one of THE MOST STUPID and deranged denier cult arguments! It is the exactly like saying that because forest fires started naturally, like with lighting strikes, for billions of years, then it must be impossible for humans to have ever started any forest fires. We know that is not the case. Scientists also know very conclusuvely that the current global warming is being caused by the enormous buildup of greenhouse gases, mostly carbon dioxide, that human activities have caused. It makes no difference that the climate has changed naturally at times in the past for a variety of causes. The un-natural global warming and climate changes happening now do not result from any of those past causes, they result from un-natural changes in atmospheric composition caused by human activities.
  13. You are such a retard, NeoNazi! It's obvious to anyone with more than half a brain that the headline writer for that article wasn't claiming that "ever" meant 'for all time', but rather 'ever in recorded human history'. Your nitpicking a word and ignoring the facts in that article only shows what a desperate troll you are. Parts of Alaska Have No Sea Ice For the First Time Ever As Temperatures in the Region Hit Record Highs
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