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  1. he really never said that, and the german democratic republic said they were democratic but no i dont beleive that either In Hitler’s version of National Socialism, socialism was “Aryan” and focused on the “commonwealth” of everyday Germans — a group of people he unites as one based entirely on their race. In that same interview with Viereck, Hitler added:
  2. Childhood vaccines protect children from a variety of serious or potentially fatal diseases, including diphtheria, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and others. If these diseases seem uncommon — or even unheard of — it's usually because these vaccines are doing their job. Still, you might wonder about the benefits and risks of childhood vaccines. Here are straight answers to common questions about childhood vaccines. Is natural immunity better than vaccination? A natural infection might provide better immunity than vaccination — but there are serious risks. For example, a natural chickenpox (varicella) infection could lead to pneumonia. A natural polio infection could cause permanent paralysis. A natural mumps infection could lead to deafness. A natural Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infection could result in permanent brain damage or even death. Vaccination can help prevent these diseases and their potentially serious complications. Do vaccines cause autism? Vaccines do not cause autism. Despite much controversy on the topic, researchers haven't found a connection between autism and childhood vaccines. In fact, the original study that ignited the debate years ago has been retracted. Are vaccine side effects dangerous? Any vaccine can cause side effects. Usually, these side effects are minor — a low-grade fever, fussiness and soreness at the injection site. Some vaccines cause a temporary headache, fatigue or loss of appetite. Rarely, a child might experience a severe allergic reaction or a neurological side effect, such as a seizure. Although these rare side effects are a concern, the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm or death is extremely small. The benefits of getting a vaccine are much greater than the possible side effects for almost all children. Of course, vaccines aren't given to children who have known allergies to specific vaccine components. Likewise, if your child develops a life-threatening reaction to a particular vaccine, further doses of that vaccine won't be given. Why are vaccines given so early? The diseases that childhood vaccines are meant to prevent are most likely to occur when a child is very young and the risk of complications is greatest. That makes early vaccination — sometimes beginning shortly after birth — essential. If you postpone vaccines until a child is older, it might be too late. Is it OK to pick and choose vaccines? In general, skipping vaccines isn't a good idea. This can leave your child vulnerable to potentially serious diseases that could otherwise be avoided. And consider this: For some children — including those who can't receive certain vaccines for medical reasons (such as cancer therapy) — the only protection from vaccine-preventable diseases is the immunity of the people around them. If immunization rates drop, vaccine-preventable diseases might once again become common threats. If you have reservations about particular vaccines, discuss your concerns with your child's doctor. If your child falls behind the standard vaccines schedule, ask the doctor about catch-up immunizations. Transcriptfor video Mayo Clinic Minute: Why and when children should be vaccinated https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/infant-and-toddler-health/in-depth/vaccines/art-20048334
  3. some of it, taxes are a duty you exchange for having rights ad opportunity .. it isnt all yours.. if others are in need.. so does the governmet own your labour, no no it does not, do you have a duty to your fellow man? yes you do
  4. Are undocumented immigrants bringing high levels of infectious disease into the United States? That’s one of the claims made by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, who has made opposition to illegal immigration one of the cornerstones of his campaign. "Tremendous infectious disease is pouring across the border," Trump said in a statement released on July 6, 2015. "The United States has become a dumping ground for Mexico and, in fact, for many other parts of the world." This is the latest iteration of an old claim. Last year, we fact-checked a statement by Rep. Phil Gingrey, R-Ga., that there are "reports" of undocumented minors reaching the border "carrying deadly diseases such as … Ebola virus." Because the outbreak of Ebola was occurring in Africa -- rather than in Central America, where most of the unaccompanied children were coming from -- we rated the claim Pants on Fire. But Trump’s claim is broader. We wondered: Is he right about the threat to Americans’ health? We asked Trump’s camp for evidence, but they did not get back to us. We also asked the Centers for Disease Control, which referred us to the Department of Health and Human Services. HHS did not respond to our inquiries. So we sought guidance from medical experts. Their consensus was that there’s essentially no hard data on the question of whether unusual levels of disease are flowing into the United States due to undocumented immigrants. For this reason, we aren’t putting Trump’s claim on the Truth-O-Meter, but we thought readers would be interested to hear what we found. The CDC, on its website, acknowledges that there’s a risk, though it’s important to note that the risk doesn’t stem exclusively from undocumented immigrants. Indeed, they probably represent a distinct minority of border crossers. Approximately 300 million legal crossings take place from Mexico into the United States annually along the 1,969-mile border, and about 15 million Americans visit Mexico each year, according to CDC. "The sheer number of people who live, work, and travel between the United States and Mexico has led to a sharing of culture and commerce, as well as the easy transportation of infectious diseases," CDC writes on its website. "The large movement of people across the United States and Mexico border has led to an increase in health issues, particularly infectious diseases such as tuberculosis." For this reason, CDC and its Mexican counterpart have established a disease-surveillance infrastructure on the border. Sponsored Content CDC specifically cites the possibility of the cross-border movement of "HIV, measles, pertussis, rubella, rabies, hepatitis A, influenza, tuberculosis, shigellosis, syphilis, Mycobacterium bovis infection, brucellosis, and foodborne diseases, such as infections associated with raw cheese and produce," though vaccination has helped reduce the risk. So what outbreaks have been reported at the border? Not many. In July 2014, when a surge of undocumented minors from Central America was heading toward the U.S.-Mexico border, a union that represents border patrol officers announced that an agent had been diagnosed with scabies while processing such migrants. Scabies is an itchy skin condition caused by a mite that is highly contagious, though also easily treated, according to the Mayo Clinic. It’s analogous to head lice. A more serious risk -- if it materialized, which it hasn’t -- is tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is more common in other countries it is in the United States. But border officials are well aware of the threat and are on the lookout. A spokesman for the HHS Administration for Children and Families told NBC Newsin 2014 that "when children come into the Department of Health and Human Services program, they are given a well-child exam and given all needed childhood vaccinations to protect against communicable diseases. They are also screened for tuberculosis, and receive a mental health exam. If children are determined to have any communicable disease or have been exposed to a communicable disease, they are placed in a program or facility that has the capacity to quarantine." Meanwhile, Mark Ward of Texas Children’s Hospital, who is president of the Texas Pediatric Society, told NBC that "as might be expected from children that had endured long journeys, they are tired," and some had common diarrheal and respiratory illnesses. Martin Garza, a Texas pediatrician who is caring for immigrants in McAllen, Texas, concurred, telling NBC that "they have common colds and other respiratory infections that kids get every day, stomach pain and constipation or diarrhea." The experts we contacted agreed that there is no evidence of a massive influx of infections across the border. "There is no evidence whatsoever that this is so," said Arthur Caplan, director of the division of medical ethics at New York University’s Langone Medical Center. "No study or survey shows this. There is no outbreak or bump in disease attributable to immigrants." Thomas Fekete, the section chief for infectious diseases at the Temple University School of Medicine, agreed. "When it comes to the health of immigrants, it is possible that undocumented folks have more health conditions that warrant concern, but I do not know of a scientific or quantitative assessment," Fekete said. "Workers are probably in decent health as the work itself is arduous. But there are some illnesses that occur more commonly in poor countries, such as tuberculosis, and some that occur more commonly because of farming or lifestyle issues, such as cysticercosis. But the notion that the Mexican government is orchestrating the movement of sick Mexicans to the U.S. is wacky." He added, "Even if their health is in some ways worse than ours, we have the capacity to deal with this and produce minimum drag on our economy."https://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2015/jul/23/are-illegal-immigrants-bringing-tremendous-diseas/
  5. myth Migrants don't bring disease. In fact, they help fight it, report says Migration also boosts economies, the new report notes. People who oppose immigration often argue that migrants bring disease with them, and that they then become a burden to health systems in their new countries because they’re so sick. But that's not true, a team of experts argued in a new report released Wednesday. In fact, they point out that immigrants make up a significant portion of the healthcare work forces in their new homelands. "There is no evidence to show that migrants are spreading disease," said Dr. Paul Spiegel, who directs the Center for Humanitarian Health at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. "That is a false argument that is used to keep migrants out," Spiegel told NBC News. "Contrary to the current political narrative portraying migrants as disease carriers who are a blight on society, migrants are an essential part of economic stability in the U.S.," added Terry McGovern, who heads Columbia University’s Department of Population and Family Health. Border battle: Trump defends use of tear gas on migrants NOV. 27, 201802:19 McGovern and Spiegel were among 24 commissioners who worked on a two-year project to analyze whether migration spreads disease and to look into the effects that migrants have on health. The final study, published in the Lancet medical journal, finds that migration benefits economies. It also finds that people are using myths to fight migration. "In too many countries, the issue of migration is used to divide societies and advance a populist agenda," said Lancet editor Richard Horton. "With one billion people on the move today, growing populations in many regions of the world, and the rising aspirations of a new generation of young people, migration is not going away. Migrants commonly contribute more to the economy than they cost, and how we shape their health and well-being today will impact our societies for generations to come." Related HEALTH Vectors or Victims? Docs Slam Rumors That Migrants Carry Disease About a quarter of the one billion migrants are moving from one country to another. The rest are moving internally, the report found. The two-year study found that international migrants are less likely than people in their host countries to die of heart disease, cancer, respiratory diseases and other ills. The exceptions are hepatitis, tuberculosis and HIV. But the study also found these infections are generally only spread within the affected immigrant communities and not to the wider population. Conditions in refugee camps and detention centers can lead to undervaccination and the spread of infectious disease, Spiegel noted. "It’s not migrants or migration itself that is spreading disease. It may be the situations that they are in and the lack of access to basic care that may exacerbate the situation," he said. As for fears that immigrants will outbreed their hosts, the study found that, in six European countries, fertility rates among migrant women were lower than among native-born residents. Recommended HEALTH NEWSEbola outbreak alarming, but not yet a 'global health threat,' WHO says WORLDFrench doctor accused of killing 9 patients And several reports have found that immigrants make up a substantial portion of the healthcare workforce, including in the United States. A report published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that 16 percent of healthcare workers in the U.S. were born somewhere else, including 29 percent of physicians, 16 percent of registered, nurses 20 percent of pharmacists, 24 percent of dentists and 23 percent of nursing, psychiatric and home health aides. In Britain, 37 percent of doctors were educated in another country. "Rather than being a burden, migrants are more likely to bolster services by providing medical care, teaching children, caring for older people, and supporting understaffed services," the Lancet, which sponsored the report with University College London, said in a statement. Related HEALTH Separating kids at border is ‘great injustice,' doctors say Nonetheless, migrants are often mistreated because of unfounded fears, the report found. For instance, the Trump administration has proposed barriers to make it harder for immigrants already in the U.S. legally to get visas or green cards if they use Medicaid, food stamps or public housing. Medical groups including the American Medical Association have spoken out against the policy, saying it will end up costing taxpayers more as people fail to get early health care and end up getting sicker than they otherwise would. "Forgoing care can exacerbate medical conditions leading to sicker patients and a higher reliance on hospital emergency departments. In turn, this could drive up costs for all purchasers of care," American Hospital Association president Rick Pollack said in a statement. Research has already found that many immigrants are afraid to sign up for public benefits because of fear they will be deported — even if they are in the U.S. legally. Other policies can worsen mental health and have long-term repercussions. Related HEALTH 'Like I am trash': Migrant children reveal stories of detention, separation "The separation of migrant children from their parents creates long term psychological damage — and is a cruel and unnecessary aspect of U.S. policy," Columbia’s McGovern said. "The criminalization and detention of migrants seeking internationally protected refuge violates international law, and puts them at greater risk of ill health." It makes better sense for host countries to take care of immigrants and asylum seekers, Spiegel said. "Migration is occurring and will be occurring no matter what," he said. "Racism and prejudice should be confronted with a zero tolerance approach," the report recommends. "Public leaders and elected officials have a political, social, and legal responsibility to oppose xenophobia and racism that fuels prejudice and exclusion of migrant populations." Maggie Fox Maggie Fox is a senior writer for NBC News and TODAY, covering health policy, science, medical treatments and disease. by Taboola Sponsored Stories ULTIMATE PET NUTRITION NUTRA THRIVE SUPPLEMENTAging Cat? Help Them Thrive By Doing This One Thing IBMWant IBM Watson Studio Desktop? Start Here https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/immigration-border-crisis/migrants-don-t-bring-disease-fact-they-help-fight-it-n944146
  6. you get what you pay for Highest Income Tax for Singles First, let’s look at the countries with the highest all-in average personal income tax rates at the average wage for a single person with no children. 1. Belgium, 42.0% Belgium, like many countries we’ll discuss here, has a progressive tax, which means that higher-income individuals pay more taxes than lower-income individuals do. Its top progressive rate is 50%. Income from property, work, investments and miscellaneous sources is all taxable. Capital gains tax rates depend on the type of capital. Employees also pay a social security tax of 13.07% of their income. The government allows deductions for business expenses, social contributions and 80% of alimony payments, and there is a personal allowance based on filing status. 2. Germany, 39.7% Germany levies a progressive income and capital tax that caps out at 45%. Sources of taxable income include agriculture, forestry, business ownership, employment, self-employment, savings and investments, rental property and capital gains. The first EUR 801 in savings and investment income is not taxed, thanks to the saver’s allowance. There is a 25% withholding tax on interest and dividends and a 15% withholding tax on royalties. Members of certain churches pay an 8% or 9% church tax, which is tax deductible. Church taxes are levied in many European countries. In some cases only church members are required to pay a percentage of income to the church to which they belong; in others, all taxpayers pay a church tax but have the option of paying it to the state instead of to a religious organization. Income of up to EUR 8,652 is considered a personal allowance and is not taxed. Other deductions include a percentage of contributions to a statutory pension insurance plan; health insurance premiums; private accident, life, unemployment, and disability insurance premiums; donations to registered charities; and up to EUR 6,000 per year in training for a future profession. 3. Denmark, 36.1% Denmark’s progressive income tax tops out at 55.8%, and the average individual pays 45%. The Danes pay an 8% Danish labor market contribution tax, a 5% healthcare tax, 22.5% to 27.8% in municipal taxes, social security taxes of DKK1,080 (USD 164) per year and capital gains taxes of 27% or 42%. There is a withholding tax of 27% on dividends and 25% on royalties. Employment income, bonuses, fringe benefits, business income, fees, pensions, annuities, social security benefits, dividends, interest, capital gains, and real estate rental income are all taxable. There is also a voluntary church tax of 0.43% to 1.40%. Tax deductions are available for limited contributions to approved Danish pensions, unemployment insurance, interest on debt, charitable contributions, unreimbursed work travel, and double households. 4. Austria, 34.9% Austrians pay progressive taxes as high as 55% on earned income, which includes employment income and certain fringe benefits. Investment income and capital gains are taxed at 27.5%. White-collar employees contribute 18.07% of their income to social security, while blue-collar employees contribute 18.2%, subject to a ceiling of EUR 4,530. Austria provides automatic tax credits based on the number of individuals in a household that earn income, as well as credits for children and travel to work. Certain work-related expenses and child-care expenses are tax deductible. 5. Hungary, 34.5% Unlike other countries discussed in this article, Hungary assesses a flat personal income tax, not a progressive one, and the rate is 16%. This rate sounds relatively low, but as it applies to all income, it does not necessarily mean that Hungarians have a lower overall tax burden. Passive income from sources such as dividends, interest, and property rentals is also taxed at 16%. Hungary provides deductions for professional training and business travel expenses, and families receive a deduction for each child. Hungary treats each spouse as a separate taxpayer. Social insurance contributions are 18.5% of income for employees. How the U.S. Compares The United States comes in at 25.6% in this category of average-earning singles with no children, giving it the 16th highest tax rate. The countries with the lowest all-in average personal income tax rates on single people with no children are Chile (7.0%), Mexico (10.3%), and Korea (13.8%). Income tax burdens vary so much by country because of the rates at which each country funds social insurance programs such as old age pensions and health care. Highest Income Tax for Singles First, let’s look at the countries with the highest all-in average personal income tax rates at the average wage for a single person with no children. 1. Belgium, 42.0% Belgium, like many countries we’ll discuss here, has a progressive tax, which means that higher-income individuals pay more taxes than lower-income individuals do. Its top progressive rate is 50%. Income from property, work, investments and miscellaneous sources is all taxable. Capital gains tax rates depend on the type of capital. Employees also pay a social security tax of 13.07% of their income. The government allows deductions for business expenses, social contributions and 80% of alimony payments, and there is a personal allowance based on filing status. 2. Germany, 39.7% Germany levies a progressive income and capital tax that caps out at 45%. Sources of taxable income include agriculture, forestry, business ownership, employment, self-employment, savings and investments, rental property and capital gains. The first EUR 801 in savings and investment income is not taxed, thanks to the saver’s allowance. There is a 25% withholding tax on interest and dividends and a 15% withholding tax on royalties. Members of certain churches pay an 8% or 9% church tax, which is tax deductible. Church taxes are levied in many European countries. In some cases only church members are required to pay a percentage of income to the church to which they belong; in others, all taxpayers pay a church tax but have the option of paying it to the state instead of to a religious organization. Income of up to EUR 8,652 is considered a personal allowance and is not taxed. Other deductions include a percentage of contributions to a statutory pension insurance plan; health insurance premiums; private accident, life, unemployment, and disability insurance premiums; donations to registered charities; and up to EUR 6,000 per year in training for a future profession. 3. Denmark, 36.1% Denmark’s progressive income tax tops out at 55.8%, and the average individual pays 45%. The Danes pay an 8% Danish labor market contribution tax, a 5% healthcare tax, 22.5% to 27.8% in municipal taxes, social security taxes of DKK1,080 (USD 164) per year and capital gains taxes of 27% or 42%. There is a withholding tax of 27% on dividends and 25% on royalties. Employment income, bonuses, fringe benefits, business income, fees, pensions, annuities, social security benefits, dividends, interest, capital gains, and real estate rental income are all taxable. There is also a voluntary church tax of 0.43% to 1.40%. Tax deductions are available for limited contributions to approved Danish pensions, unemployment insurance, interest on debt, charitable contributions, unreimbursed work travel, and double households. 4. Austria, 34.9% Austrians pay progressive taxes as high as 55% on earned income, which includes employment income and certain fringe benefits. Investment income and capital gains are taxed at 27.5%. White-collar employees contribute 18.07% of their income to social security, while blue-collar employees contribute 18.2%, subject to a ceiling of EUR 4,530. Austria provides automatic tax credits based on the number of individuals in a household that earn income, as well as credits for children and travel to work. Certain work-related expenses and child-care expenses are tax deductible. 5. Hungary, 34.5% Unlike other countries discussed in this article, Hungary assesses a flat personal income tax, not a progressive one, and the rate is 16%. This rate sounds relatively low, but as it applies to all income, it does not necessarily mean that Hungarians have a lower overall tax burden. Passive income from sources such as dividends, interest, and property rentals is also taxed at 16%. Hungary provides deductions for professional training and business travel expenses, and families receive a deduction for each child. Hungary treats each spouse as a separate taxpayer. Social insurance contributions are 18.5% of income for employees. How the U.S. Compares The United States comes in at 25.6% in this category of average-earning singles with no children, giving it the 16th highest tax rate. The countries with the lowest all-in average personal income tax rates on single people with no children are Chile (7.0%), Mexico (10.3%), and Korea (13.8%). Income tax burdens vary so much by country because of the rates at which each country funds social insurance programs such as old age pensions and health care.https://www.investopedia.com/taxes/countries-highest-income-taxes/
  7. you dont have a right to spread a deadly disease and endager your whole community
  8. vaccines eliminated these diseases ask any doctor, obviously no one in your family is from a medical backround the whole immigrants bring disease is absolutely an ugly myth uneducated people lke you spread disease Migrants don't bring disease. In fact, they help fight it, report says Migration also boosts economies, the new report notes. Dec. 5, 2018, 6:40 PM EST By Maggie Fox People who oppose immigration often argue that migrants bring disease with them, and that they then become a burden to health systems in their new countries because they’re so sick. But that's not true, a team of experts argued in a new report released Wednesday. In fact, they point out that immigrants make up a significant portion of the healthcare work forces in their new homelands. "There is no evidence to show that migrants are spreading disease," said Dr. Paul Spiegel, who directs the Center for Humanitarian Health at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. "That is a false argument that is used to keep migrants out," Spiegel told NBC News. "Contrary to the current political narrative portraying migrants as disease carriers who are a blight on society, migrants are an essential part of economic stability in the U.S.," added Terry McGovern, who heads Columbia University’s Department of Population and Family Health. https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/immigration-border-crisis/migrants-don-t-bring-disease-fact-they-help-fight-it-n944146
  9. guilluamezenz

    Adolf Hitler was not a socialist

    Thus, Hitler argues, a “workers council” taking charge of a company would only get in the way.
  10. guilluamezenz

    Adolf Hitler was not a socialist

    Thus, Hitler argues, a “workers council” taking charge of a company would only get in the way.
  11. guilluamezenz

    which is more fun?

    u r nutz
  12. Some people ask the question, “If vaccines work, why do unvaccinated people present a risk to those who have been vaccinated?” Two simple facts contribute to this answer. First: Vaccines aren’t 100 percent effective. So even some people who are vaccinated will still be at risk. Second: The greater the number of unvaccinated people in a community, the more opportunity germs have to spread. This means outbreaks are more difficult to stem and everyone is at greater risk of exposure — including vaccinated people.Some people ask the question, “If vaccines work, why do unvaccinated people present a risk to those who have been vaccinated?” Two simple facts contribute to this answer. First: Vaccines aren’t 100 percent effective. So even some people who are vaccinated will still be at risk. Second: The greater the number of unvaccinated people in a community, the more opportunity germs have to spread. This means outbreaks are more difficult to stem and everyone is at greater risk of exposure — including vaccinated people.https://www.chop.edu/news/feature-article-if-vaccines-work-why-do-unvaccinated-people-pose-risk
  13. good its nonsesne the non vacinated have caused deadly problems and there are no provable harms of vaccines they save millions of lives
  14. In the 21st century, Norway, Denmark and Sweden remain the icons of fair societies, with high economic productivity and quality of life. But they are also an enigma in a cultural-evolutionary sense: though by no means following the same socio-economic formula, they are all cases of a “non-hubristic”, socially sustainable modernity that puzzles outside observers. Using Nordic welfare states as its laboratory, Sustainable Modernity combines evolutionary and socio-cultural perspectives to illuminate the mainsprings of what the authors call the “well-being society”. The main contention is that Nordic uniqueness is not merely the outcome of one particular set of historical institutional or political arrangements, or sheer historical luck; rather, the high welfare creation inherent in the Nordic model has been predicated on a long and durable tradition of social cooperation, which has interacted with global competitive forces. Hence the socially sustainable Nordic modernity should be approached as an integrated and tightly orchestrated ecosystem based on a complex interplay of cooperative and competitive strategies within and across several domains: normative-cultural, socio-political and redistributive. The key question is: Can the Nordic countries uphold the balance of competition and cooperation and reproduce their resilience in the age of globalization, cultural collisions, the digital economy, the fragmentation of the work/life division and often intrusive EU regulation? With contributors providing insights from the humanities, the social sciences and evolutionary science, this book will be of great interest to students and scholars of political science, sociology, history, institutional economics, Nordic studies and human evolution studies. Nina Witoszek is a research professor at the Centre for Development and the Environment, Norway, and the Director of the Arne Næss Programme on Global Justice and the Environment at the University of Oslo, Norway. Atle Midttun is a professor at the BI Norwegian School of Management, Department of Law and Governance, Norway; the Co-Director of the Centre for Corporate Responsibility, Denmark; and the Co-Director of the Centre for Energy and Environment, UKhttps://evolution-institute.org/new.evolution-institute.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Sustainable-Modernity.pdf
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