Jump to content

BlueDoggL

Member
  • Content Count

    2,689
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Manly Like Trump
  • Location
    Moscow and DC
  • Interests
    Trump

Previous Fields

  • Political Party:
    No Party/Other

Profile Fields

  • Website URL
    https://trump-supporters.blogspot.com

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. All you MAGAts who think that capitalism is a religion and that the rich pay too much in taxes it is time for you to go fuck yourselves. For all you MAGAts that think the distribution of wealth in this country is moral and fair, it's time for you to go fuck yourselves. For all you MAGAts who think it is moral that the CEO of McDonalds is paid over 700 times more than his workers, it's time for you all to go fuck yourselves. Below is what hard working Americans get paid to their dangerous and difficult work. If you think this is fair and moral, it's time to go fuck yourselves with an AIDS infested dildo. None of the jobs below, jobs that most of you fat slobs are too unmanly and unfit to do, don't pay a living wage. EAT EAT EAT you big fat losers. 1. Fishers and Related Fishing Workers > Fatal injuries in 2017: 100.0 per 100,000 workers > Total: 41 fatal injuries, 120 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents > Median annual wage: $28,310 Fishers and related fishing workers had the highest rates of fatal injury in 2017. Commercial fishing is largely physical work that involves fishing nets, gear and slippery decks. Fishers and related fishing workers can also be exposed to challenging environmental factors, such as extreme weather. In addition, workers may be out on the water or working from a remote area when an accident occurs, and easy access to a hospital or medical professional may not be readily available. The majority of fatalities among fishers and related fishing workers are due to drowning. 2. Logging Workers > Fatal injuries in 2017: 87.3 per 100,000 workers > Total: 55 fatal injuries, 350 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Contact with objects and equipment > Median annual wage: $38,840 While the logging industry takes numerous measures to promote safety among workers, the nature of the work means there will be injury and fatalities. Logging is physically very demanding and requires that workers labor primarily outdoors and often in remote areas, far from medical aid. The most common accident is when a worker is struck by an object, such as a log or falling branch, or experiences a mishap with dangerous machinery, such as harvesters and chainsaws, which are common in the trade. 3. Roofers > Fatal injuries in 2017: 45.2 per 100,000 workers > Total: 91 fatal injuries, 2,810 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips > Median annual wage: $38,970 Due to the nature of roofing work, a fall, slip, or trip can result in serious injury in ways it would not for a person working on level ground. Roofers can slip from scaffolds, ladders, or roofs, falling to lower levels. Roofers are also at risk of heat-related illnesses from working in the hot sun during summer months. 4. Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors > Fatal injuries in 2017: 34.9 per 100,000 workers > Total: 30 fatal injuries, 1,340 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents > Median annual wage: $36,160 The vast majority of refuse and recyclable material collectors report working in a vehicle every day. As a result, these workers undergo numerous injuries caused by transportation incidents, including automobile accidents, each year. They are also often exposed to contaminants such as pollutants, which can result in illness. 5. Driver/Sales Workers and Truck Drivers > Fatal injuries in 2017: 26.9 per 100,000 workers > Total: 987 fatal injuries, 77,470 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents > Median annual wage: $37,610 Most of the driver/sales workers and truck drivers are delivery drivers who spend much of their time on the road in both light and heavy trucks. Not surprisingly, the most common types of accidents to result in fatal injury are transportation-related, such as motor vehicle accidents. Many of these workers must also lift and move heavy objects, which can cause injury. Source: Thinkstock 6. Grounds Maintenance Workers > Fatal injuries in 2017: 15.9 per 100,000 workers > Total: 191 fatal injuries, 13,310 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips > Median annual wage: $28,110 Groundskeeping is typically a physically demanding job, performed outdoors in all weather conditions. Fatalities on the job are caused by a range of accidents — from slips and falls to harmful contact with equipment. There were 15.9 fatalities for every 100,000 people working as groundskeepers in 2017 — the 15th highest fatality rate among occupations. These workers frequently use dangerous equipment, and contact with this equipment is a regular cause of death. Many of them, such as tree trimmers and pruners, work at dangerous heights, and the most common cause of death among grounds maintenance workers are falls, slips, and trips. 7. Maintenance and Repair Workers, General > Fatal injuries in 2017: 16.6 per 100,000 workers > Total: 87 fatal injuries, 23,200 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips > Median annual wage: $37,670 General maintenance and repair workers are often engaged in multiple tasks throughout a single day — which can include fixing mechanical equipment, repairing flooring, and working on plumbing, electrical, and air-conditioning systems. Repairers often work in uncomfortable and cramped positions, and they are at a greater than typical risk of suffering electrical shocks, cuts, and falls. Falls, slips, and trips account for one third of all fatal injuries in the profession, the most of any type of accident. Nonfatal injuries, however, are far more common. General maintenance repair workers suffered 87 fatalities and 23,200 nonfatal injuries per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in 2017, each among the most of any profession per capita. 8. Helpers, Construction Trades > Fatal injuries in 2017: 17.3 per 100,000 workers > Total: 11 fatal injuries, 2,660 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips > Median annual wage: $30,120 Construction work in general is among the most dangerous in the country — four separate occupations within the construction industry are among the 25 most dangerous. Helpers in construction trades have the second highest fatality rate among those four occupations. As is the case for most occupations in construction, falls, slips, and trips are the most common cause of fatalities. Unlike the majority of the jobs with the highest fatality rates, a relatively small share of injuries result in fatalities. There were 11 fatal injuries and 2,660 nonfatal injuries among construction helpers. Nationally, 0.58% of all workplace injuries in 2017 were fatal, compared to the 0.41% of injuries among construction helpers. 9. Miscellaneous Agricultural Workers > Fatal injuries in 2017: 17.7 per 100,000 workers > Total: 154 fatal injuries, 13,500 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents > Median annual wage: $23,710 Approximately half of all fatal injuries affecting miscellaneous agricultural workers were caused by transportation incidents — many of which involved motorized off-road vehicles, such as tractors. The occupation also results in a relatively large amount of nonfatal injuries at 1,555 for every 100,000 workers — nearly double the comparable national rate. Many workers employed in dangerous occupations are compensated for the assumed risk with a higher wage, but in addition to being a dangerous job, miscellaneous agricultural workers are the lowest paid of all the jobs on our list. The median annual earnings for someone in this profession is $23,710. 10. Construction Laborers > Fatal injuries in 2017: 14.3 per 100,000 workers > Total: 259 fatal injuries, 21,760 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips > Median annual wage: $34,530 There were 259 deaths on the job among construction workers in 2017 — or 14.1 deaths per 100,000 full-time construction workers. Construction workers often work at great heights on scaffolding, and roughly one-third of those deaths were caused by slips and falls. Many who work in construction also interact with heavy equipment and powerful tools on a daily basis — and about one in five construction worker deaths in 2017 was caused by contact with equipment. Nonfatal injuries are also relatively common among construction laborers, totaling 21,760 in 2017 alone. 11. Firefighters > Fatal injuries in 2017: 8.9 per 100,000 workers > Total: 34 fatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents > Median annual wage: $49,080 As of last year, there were over 300,000 American firefighters, just over two thirds of which were volunteers, meaning they were employed on a retainer basis. These men and women have one of the deadliest work environments of any occupation. Firefighters are at risk of injury or death due to burns, smoke inhalation, and collapsing structures. 12. Painters, Construction and Maintenance > Fatal injuries in 2017: 8.9 per 100,000 workers > Total: 44 fatal injuries, 4,200 nonfatal injuries > Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips > Median annual wage: $37,960 Construction and maintenance painters apply paint, stain, and other coatings to buildings and other structures. They often work in demanding or dangerous environments and can sustain injury from lifting heavy objects and exposure to chemicals and other irritants. The most common cause of fatal injury among professional painters is alls and trips while working on ladders or other elevated locations. Here's the Living Wage Needed in All 50 States (Study 2019 ... www.gobankingrates.com/making-money/jobs/living-wage-every-state/
  2. Oh good the medications are kicking in.
  3. Now you are going to all caps. Ask for some needle drugs before you have another. "behavioral seizure". Go for the injection. It works quickly with rageaholics like you. They should just keep you on it.
  4. When you start with the excessive punctuation marks it's a sign that you are about to go into full melt down. I hope they put you in a straight jacket or a restraint chair before the throw you into the rubber room. Last time you smeared feces all over the walls.
  5. Are you trying to remain calm psycho? It won't last long. You will be back in the retrain chair soon.
  6. CockBreath told me he was a psych nurse who punches cops.
  7. Click Golfbag's link and read it. It's total BS. Like every thing that come from MAGAs there is no proof. Obama: Mariia Butina, Alexander Torsion, US Treasury - FOX NEWS -
  8. You may be a prick with ears but don't yell at your tiny dick. It can't help it. Does you mom also call you needle dick?
  9. That's a little too much information.
  10. GolfBag has a criminal record involving sex with minors.
  11. You are always butt hurt loser. Watch Fox News and bask in the lies. You will feel better. Then take that big rubber dick that you stick in you ass every night and paint it orange. Suck it and say MAGA.
  12. Suck Trump's dick cop hater. This is a tough one for you and the other MAGAts to lie about. This has been a question lots of people ask and answer. You MAGAts won't answer it because it requires an honest answer and none of you are honest. You know that if you answered Heaven it would make women who have abortions look like heroes. They spend eternity in hell while all the fetuses they abort go to heaven and be with God and the angels and avoid all the bad things life on earth can bring such as dealing with assholes like you.
  13. WARNING TO MAGAts!! This post contains FACTS! Keep a tube of extra strength Butt Hurt Cream handy. You will need it! Here are some of the top people in the Trump Whitehouse who either got forced out or fired. President Donald Trump's administration has been marked by a series of exits by high-ranking officials. Here are the most notable ones: RESIGNED488 days Kirstjen Nielsen Secretary of Homeland Security | Trump appointee Nielsen, who has become a face of President Donald Trump's hardline immigration push, resigned. "Despite our progress in reforming homeland security for a new age, I have determined that it is the right time for me to step aside," she wrote in her resignation letter. READ MORE RESIGNED689 days Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner | Trump appointee An administration official familiar with the situation said the move has been in the works for several months. Gottlieb, known for his efforts against teen vaping, has been commuting weekly to Washington from his home in Connecticut and is leaving to spend more time with his family, the official said. READ MORE RESIGNED246 days Bill Shine Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications | Trump White House staffer Shine, a former Fox News executive, joined the White House in July 2018, the sixth person to fill or be tapped for the top communications role. He stepped down to join the Trump reelection campaign, press secretary Sarah Sanders announced in a statement. READ MORE RESIGNED672 days Ryan Zinke Secretary of Interior | Trump appointee The subject of multiple ethics investigations and a possible DOJ criminal probe for using his office for personal gain, Zinke resigned rather than be fired in an end-of-year Trump staff shakeup. READ MORE FIRED712 days John Kelly White House Chief of Staff | Trump White House staffer Kelly began his tenure as Trump's secretary of homeland security, but he was moved to White House chief of staff to bring order to the White House. His relationship with Trump soured, however, and he was ultimately pushed out. Trump announced the move before finding a replacement for Kelly. READ MORE RESIGNED711 days James Mattis Secretary of Defense | Trump appointee One of the original generals in Trump's Cabinet and inner circle, Mattis resigned in protest to Trump's decision to remove US troops from Syria. READ MORE RESIGNED706 days Nikki Haley US Ambassador to the UN | Trump appointee President Trump celebrated US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley Oct. 9 in the Oval Office as one of his more popular Cabinet members, in a surprise announcement, said she had resigned and would leave her post by the end of the year. READ MORE FIRED208 days Mira Ricardel Deputy National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer A feud with the first lady's office may have cost the senior national security adviser her job after she sparred with East Wing staff and other key members of the Trump administration. The dispute spilled into public view in extraordinary fashion when the first lady's office released a statement calling for Ricardel's ouster as reports surfaced that President Donald Trump would fire the official, deputy national security adviser Mira Ricardel. She is expected to take another job in the administration. READ MORE FIRED639 days Jeff Sessions Attorney General | Trump appointee President Donald Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions November 7, one day after the midterm elections. Sessions' chief of staff Matthew Whitaker will take over as acting attorney general, the President said. READ MORE UNKNOWN636 days Don McGahn White House Counsel | Trump White House staffer President Donald Trump said Aug. 29 that Don McGahn, who had been with the White House since the presidential transition would leave his job as White House counsel following Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, which was made official Oct. 7. READ MORE RESIGNED533 days Joe Hagin Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations | Trump White House staffer Joe Hagin is the White House official who orchestrated logistics for the summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. A veteran of every Republican administration since President Ronald Reagan, Hagin will return to the private sector. READ MORE RESIGNED504 days Scott Pruitt Environmental Protection Agency Administrator | Trump appointee An ethics cloud hung over Pruitt for months, as lawmakers from both parties, environmental groups and government watchdogs raised questions about his spending, housing arrangements, security team and raises for political appointees. All told, Pruitt left EPA having faced more than a dozen inquiries or reviews into his practices at the agency, including his first-class plane travel, a room that he rented from a lobbyist at $50 per night and the installation of a soundproof booth in his office. READ MORE RESIGNED526 days Tom Homan Director of ICE | Trump appointee The polarizing face of the administration's immigration enforcement, and a favorite of President Donald Trump himself, Tom Homan had announced in April he would be taking his long-delayed retirement. Homan has told the story of receiving the request to stay on as chief of ICE under Trump while celebrating at his going away party -- a retirement that was deferred for a year and a half. READ MORE RESIGNED292 days Ty Cobb White House Special Counsel | Trump White House staffer A source familiar with Cobb's departure said the former federal prosecutor, who joined Trump's legal team in July 2017, had been clashing with the President over Trump's combative posture with the special counsel's investigation. READ MORE FIRED409 days Nadia Schadlow Deputy National Security Adviser for Strategy | Trump White House staffer Schadlow was a principal author of the President's National Security Strategy document. She was expected to resign or be pushed out after President Donald Trump announced John Bolton would become National Security Adviser to Trump. READ MORE FIRED446 days Tom Bossert Homeland Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer White House homeland security adviser Tom Bossert was pushed out of his position by the newly installed national security adviser John Bolton READ MORE FIRED434 days Michael Anton National Security Council | Trump White House staffer Anton was brought into the NSC by Michael Flynn, Trump's first national security adviser, who plead guilty to lying to the FBI last year. Anton resigned after learning he would be fired the next day. READ MORE FIRED411 days H.R. McMaster National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer National security adviser H.R. McMaster agreed to resign and be replaced by former US ambassador and Fox News analyst John Bolton. READ MORE RESIGNED434 days Hope Hicks White House Communications Director | Trump White House staffer Hicks, one of Trump's longest-serving and closest aides, resigned in the wake of the scandal involving former senior aide Rob Porter, whose public defense Hicks helped craft while also dating him. READ MORE FIRED432 days David Shulkin Secretary of Veterans Affairs | Trump appointee Trump once joked that his signature phrase, "you're fired" would never be used with Shulkin, but things soured early this year. Shulkin was the subject of a damning report from the department's inspector general that found the VA leader had spent a good deal of a European trip sightseeing and had inappropriately accepted a gift of Wimbledon tickets. READ MORE UNKNOWN357 days Josh Raffel Deputy Communications Director | Trump White House staffer Raffel, who was recruited to the White House by Jared Kushner, primarily served as a spokesman for Ivanka Trump and Kushner's White House initiatives, including the Office of American Innovation and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. READ MORE RESIGNED279 days John Dowd Trump's lead lawyer | Trump legal team Dowd's resignation came as Trump stepped up his attacks on special counsel Robert Mueller and days after Dowd said in a statement the investigation should end, initially claiming he was speaking for the President before saying he was only speaking for himself. READ MORE FIRED406 days Rex Tillerson Secretary of State | Trump appointee The former Exxon CEO was supposed to be a star in Trump's Cabinet, but he and the President never seemed to be on the same page. Tillerson is reported to have referred to Trump as a "moron" during a meeting. Trump tapped CIA Director Mike Pompeo as the next secretary of state. Tillerson said he'll hand over all authority on March 13, but will technically stay in office until March 31. READ MORE FIRED418 days John McEntee Personal aide to the President | Trump White House staffer McEntee was fired and escorted from the White House. Two sources said McEntee was pushed out because of issues with his security clearance, making him the latest aide to be forced out because of difficulties obtaining a permanent security clearance. Minutes later, McEntee was hired to work on Trump's re-election campaign. READ MORE RESIGNED414 days John Feeley US Ambassador to Panama | Obama appointee According to an excerpt of his resignation letter that was read to CNN, Feeley's decision was clearly prompted by differences with the Trump administration but was made before the reporting about President Donald Trump's "Bad wordhole" comments. READ MORE RESIGNED411 days Gary Cohn Chief Economic Adviser | Trump White House staffer Cohn left the White House in the wake of his fierce disagreement with the President's decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. READ MORE RESIGNED268 days Rachel Brand Associate Attorney General | Trump appointee A veteran of the George W. Bush administration, Brand's appointment to the number three position at the Justice Department was seen as a solid professional choice. She left for a job in the private sector. READ MORE RESIGNED285 days David Sorensen White House speechwriter | Trump White House staffer Sorensen resigned after being accused of domestic abuse, which he denied. He exited the same week that top White House staffer Rob Porter also resigned amid domestic abuse allegations. READ MORE RESIGNED384 days Rob Porter White House Staff Secretary | Trump White House staffer Porter resigned after two ex-wives went public with allegations of past abuse, which he denied. His security clearance had been stalled, although as staff secretary, Porter was one of the gatekeepers to Trump and the Oval Office. READ MORE RESIGNED215 days Taylor Weyeneth Deputy Chief of Staff of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy | Trump White House staffer Weyeneth, a 24-year-old former Trump campaign employee, left after a Washington Post investigation found that he had misrepresented his credentials. But weeks later he assumed a new midlevel role at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. READ MORE RESIGNED209 days Brenda Fitzgerald Director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Trump appointee Fitzgerald resigned a day after Politico reported she purchased tobacco stock after she took the position at the nation's top public health agency. READ MORE FIRED375 days Andrew McCabe FBI Deputy Director | Obama appointee A career FBI agent, McCabe resigned in late January after being a central target of Trump's ire toward the FBI. Various sources described McCabe's departure as a mutual decision, while others said it was the result of pressure to leave. On March 16, Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired McCabe over accusations he directed FBI officials to speak to the media about an investigation tied to the Clinton Foundation and misled investigators about his actions. The firing came less than two days before he was set to retire. READ MORE RESIGNED546 days Marc Short Director of Legislative Affairs | Trump White House staffer Short shepherded Trump's tax cuts to successful passage late last year in what was the high-water mark of his time in the White House. However, Short also led the unsuccessful push to repeal Obamacare, and he helped negotiate a budget deal that Trump nearly refused to sign in the spring. READ MORE RESIGNED366 days Omarosa Manigault Newman Assistant to the President and Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison |Trump White House staffer Manigault Newman was one of Trump's most high-profile African-American supporters and a former contestant on "The Apprentice." She was the top communications official at the White House Office of Public Liaison, but when chief of staff John Kelly took over, her role began to feel ill-defined, sources said. She resigned to "pursue other opportunities." READ MORE RESIGNED354 days Dina Powell Deputy National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer Powell joined the Trump administration in a senior role focused on entrepreneurship, economic growth and the empowerment of women, and in March 2017 she was named deputy national security adviser. Powell is said to have left the administration on good terms with the President. READ MORE RESIGNED309 days Jeremy Katz Deputy Director at the National Economic Council | Trump White House staffer Katz was one of the people behind the White House's push to rewrite the tax code. His resignation came after the bill was signed by Trump. READ MORE UNKNOWN347 days Rick Dearborn Deputy White House Chief of Staff | Trump White House staffer Dearborn, who previously served as Jeff Sessions' chief of staff in the Senate for several years, left the White House in early 2018 to pursue work in the private sector. Dearborn had a wide portfolio in the White House, overseeing its political operation, public outreach and legislative affairs. READ MORE RESIGNED209 days George Sifakis Assistant to the President and Director of the Office of Public Liaison | Trump White House staffer Sifakis left the administration shortly after former chief of staff Reince Priebus, a close ally and personal friend, made his own exit. READ MORE RESIGNED232 days Tom Price Health and Human Services Secretary | Trump appointee Price resigned in the midst of a scandal over his use of private planes. He was being investigated by the department's inspector general for private flights that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Price insisted that his trips had been approved. READ MORE RESIGNED244 days Keith Schiller Director of Oval Office Operations | Trump White House staffer Schiller was a longtime Trump aide and confidant. He's the one who went to the FBI to notify James Comey that he was fired. He told associates in early September that he planned to leave at the end of the month and that the reason was financial. But the move came shortly after Kelly became chief of staff with the mission of instilling new order inside Trump's often chaotic White House. READ MORE UNKNOWN214 days Sebastian Gorka White House deputy assistant | Trump White House staffer Gorka was one of Trump's most prominent cheerleaders, frequently hitting the airwaves to defend the President's national security policies and public statements. But his role outside of television appearances was unclear. READ MORE RESIGNED211 days Carl Icahn Special Adviser on Regulatory Reform | Adviser Icahn stepped down in August 2017. He was criticized by Democrats who said his advisory role created a conflict of interest because he had not taken a formal government job and was still running his businesses. READ MORE FIRED211 days Steve Bannon White House Chief Strategist | Trump White House staffer The President, whose relationship was already souring with Bannon, fired his chief strategist after Bannon was quoted contradicting Trump in American Prospect magazine. Bannon returned to his role as executive chairman of Breitbart News, but lost that position shortly after his incendiary comments about the Trump White House were revealed in Michael Wolff's book 'Fire and Fury.' READ MORE FIRED195 days Ezra Cohen-Watnick Senior Director for Intelligence on the National Security Council | Trump White House staffer Cohen-Watnick came under scrutiny for his alleged roundabout role in providing incidental foreign surveillance information concerning members of Trump's team to GOP Rep. Devin Nunes, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. Nunes later told CNN that it was definitely not Cohen-Watnick who provided him the information. READ MORE RESIGNED193 days George Gigicos White House Director of Scheduling and Advance | Trump White House staffer Gigicos said he would return to his consulting business and work for the Trump 2020 campaign. Gigicos was later fired for work on the campaign because of the size of crowds at an Arizona rally in August, 2017. READ MORE FIRED11 days Anthony Scaramucci White House Communications Director | Trump White House staffer "The Mooch" resigned after a profanity-laced interview with The New Yorker. Scaramucci was the third White House communications director to leave the post. He held the job for just 10 days. READ MORE FIRED190 days Reince Priebus White House Chief of Staff | Trump White House staffer Resigned after months of speculation he would be ousted by the administration. "The President wanted to go a different direction," he told CNN. READ MORE FIRED183 days Derek Harvey National Security Council Adviser | Trump White House staffer Harvey, a longtime intelligence officer, was appointed by former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn during his short tenure. The National Security Council did not provide a specific reason for Harvey's removal. READ MORE UNKNOWN187 days Michael Short Assistant Press Secretary | Trump White House staffer Resigned or fired by Anthony Scaramucci, ostensibly to stop leaks to the media. Responding to reports that he was being linked to White House leaks, Short said "the entire premise is false." READ MORE FIRED183 days Rich Higgins Strategic Planning Aide | Trump White House staffer Higgins allegedly wrote a memo that purports to unravel a deep state conspiracy theory about a coordinated effort to delegitimize and destroy the President. The reason Higgins was fired was not made public. READ MORE RESIGNED183 days Sean Spicer White House Press Secretary | Trump White House staffer Spicer resigned after Scaramucci was named the new White House communications director, capping off a roller coaster six-month tenure as the chief spokesman for an administration besieged by a steady drumbeat of controversy. READ MORE RESIGNED50 days Mark Corallo Spokesman and Communications Strategist for Trump's legal team | Trump legal team Corallo's resignation came after weeks of simmering tension between the White House and the President's legal team. He declined to comment on the circumstances of his departure. His exact start date is unclear. READ MORE RESIGNED181 days Walter Shaub Office of Government Ethics Director | Obama appointee Accepted a position with the Campaign Legal Center after months of clashes with the administration over Trump's refusal to divest his businesses. Shaub had served as director of the Office of Government Ethics under President Obama since 2013. READ MORE UNKNOWN168 days Tera Dahl Deputy Chief of Staff for the National Security Council | Trump White House staffer Dahl, a former Breitbart writer and ally of Steve Bannon's, left after less than six months on the National Security Council for a role "that she wants" at the US Agency for International Development. READ MORE RESIGNED119 days Michael Dubke White House Communications Director | Trump White House staffer Dubke said he had "a good conversation with the President" after submitting his resignation. He declined to discuss the turmoil inside the West Wing, saying only that he was resigning "for a number of reasons -- for personal reasons." Dubke's exact start date is unclear. READ MORE FIRED110 days James Comey FBI Director | Obama appointee The Trump administration attributed Comey's dismissal to his handling of the investigation into Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's email server, but Democrats ridiculed that notion, raising parallels to Watergate-era firings and suggesting Comey was getting too close to the White House with the Russia probe. READ MORE UNKNOWN106 days Angella Reid White House Chief Usher | Non-political White House employee Left the Trump administration after 106 days. She had served as White House Chief Usher under President Obama since 2011. No specific reason was given for her departure. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said, "It's not uncommon that you might have a transition when a new administration comes in and it's simply nothing more than that." READ MORE RESIGNED95 days Vivek Murthy Surgeon General | Obama appointee Murthy resigned at the request of the White House after assisting in the transition to the Trump administration. He continues as a member of the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps READ MORE RESIGNED80 days K.T. McFarland Deputy National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer McFarland was top deputy to Michael Flynn before his firing. She was to leave her post in the White House to become US ambassador to Singapore, but that fell through after Democrats objected to her nomination. READ MORE RESIGNED70 days Katie Walsh Deputy Chief of Staff | Trump White House staffer Walsh was Reince Priebus' deputy, joining him in the administration after serving as his chief of staff when he was chairman of the Republican National Committee. She left to serve as a senior adviser to America First Policies, a nonprofit group helmed by former Trump campaign officials.READ MORE FIRED25 days Michael Flynn National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer Forced to resign amid claims he misled the administration over his communications with Russia during the transition. In early December 2017, Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. He is cooperating with Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. READ MORE FIRED11 days Sally Yates US Deputy Attorney General | Obama appointee Fired when she was acting attorney general because she refused to implement the first iteration of Trump's ban on travelers from a number of Muslim-majority countries. Trump had tapped Yates to serve as interim attorney general while Jeff Sessions went through Senate confirmation. Yates also served as deputy attorney general under President Obama READ MORE
  14. Trump has the best people. He said it. LOL! Then he fires them or they quit. President Donald Trump's administration has been marked by a series of exits by high-ranking officials. Here are the most notable ones: RESIGNED488 days Kirstjen Nielsen Secretary of Homeland Security | Trump appointee Nielsen, who has become a face of President Donald Trump's hardline immigration push, resigned. "Despite our progress in reforming homeland security for a new age, I have determined that it is the right time for me to step aside," she wrote in her resignation letter. READ MORE RESIGNED689 days Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner | Trump appointee An administration official familiar with the situation said the move has been in the works for several months. Gottlieb, known for his efforts against teen vaping, has been commuting weekly to Washington from his home in Connecticut and is leaving to spend more time with his family, the official said. READ MORE RESIGNED246 days Bill Shine Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications | Trump White House staffer Shine, a former Fox News executive, joined the White House in July 2018, the sixth person to fill or be tapped for the top communications role. He stepped down to join the Trump reelection campaign, press secretary Sarah Sanders announced in a statement. READ MORE RESIGNED672 days Ryan Zinke Secretary of Interior | Trump appointee The subject of multiple ethics investigations and a possible DOJ criminal probe for using his office for personal gain, Zinke resigned rather than be fired in an end-of-year Trump staff shakeup. READ MORE FIRED712 days John Kelly White House Chief of Staff | Trump White House staffer Kelly began his tenure as Trump's secretary of homeland security, but he was moved to White House chief of staff to bring order to the White House. His relationship with Trump soured, however, and he was ultimately pushed out. Trump announced the move before finding a replacement for Kelly. READ MORE RESIGNED711 days James Mattis Secretary of Defense | Trump appointee One of the original generals in Trump's Cabinet and inner circle, Mattis resigned in protest to Trump's decision to remove US troops from Syria. READ MORE RESIGNED706 days Nikki Haley US Ambassador to the UN | Trump appointee President Trump celebrated US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley Oct. 9 in the Oval Office as one of his more popular Cabinet members, in a surprise announcement, said she had resigned and would leave her post by the end of the year. READ MORE FIRED208 days Mira Ricardel Deputy National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer A feud with the first lady's office may have cost the senior national security adviser her job after she sparred with East Wing staff and other key members of the Trump administration. The dispute spilled into public view in extraordinary fashion when the first lady's office released a statement calling for Ricardel's ouster as reports surfaced that President Donald Trump would fire the official, deputy national security adviser Mira Ricardel. She is expected to take another job in the administration. READ MORE FIRED639 days Jeff Sessions Attorney General | Trump appointee President Donald Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions November 7, one day after the midterm elections. Sessions' chief of staff Matthew Whitaker will take over as acting attorney general, the President said. READ MORE UNKNOWN636 days Don McGahn White House Counsel | Trump White House staffer President Donald Trump said Aug. 29 that Don McGahn, who had been with the White House since the presidential transition would leave his job as White House counsel following Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, which was made official Oct. 7. READ MORE RESIGNED533 days Joe Hagin Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations | Trump White House staffer Joe Hagin is the White House official who orchestrated logistics for the summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. A veteran of every Republican administration since President Ronald Reagan, Hagin will return to the private sector. READ MORE RESIGNED504 days Scott Pruitt Environmental Protection Agency Administrator | Trump appointee An ethics cloud hung over Pruitt for months, as lawmakers from both parties, environmental groups and government watchdogs raised questions about his spending, housing arrangements, security team and raises for political appointees. All told, Pruitt left EPA having faced more than a dozen inquiries or reviews into his practices at the agency, including his first-class plane travel, a room that he rented from a lobbyist at $50 per night and the installation of a soundproof booth in his office. READ MORE RESIGNED526 days Tom Homan Director of ICE | Trump appointee The polarizing face of the administration's immigration enforcement, and a favorite of President Donald Trump himself, Tom Homan had announced in April he would be taking his long-delayed retirement. Homan has told the story of receiving the request to stay on as chief of ICE under Trump while celebrating at his going away party -- a retirement that was deferred for a year and a half. READ MORE RESIGNED292 days Ty Cobb White House Special Counsel | Trump White House staffer A source familiar with Cobb's departure said the former federal prosecutor, who joined Trump's legal team in July 2017, had been clashing with the President over Trump's combative posture with the special counsel's investigation. READ MORE FIRED409 days Nadia Schadlow Deputy National Security Adviser for Strategy | Trump White House staffer Schadlow was a principal author of the President's National Security Strategy document. She was expected to resign or be pushed out after President Donald Trump announced John Bolton would become National Security Adviser to Trump. READ MORE FIRED446 days Tom Bossert Homeland Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer White House homeland security adviser Tom Bossert was pushed out of his position by the newly installed national security adviser John Bolton READ MORE FIRED434 days Michael Anton National Security Council | Trump White House staffer Anton was brought into the NSC by Michael Flynn, Trump's first national security adviser, who plead guilty to lying to the FBI last year. Anton resigned after learning he would be fired the next day. READ MORE FIRED411 days H.R. McMaster National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer National security adviser H.R. McMaster agreed to resign and be replaced by former US ambassador and Fox News analyst John Bolton. READ MORE RESIGNED434 days Hope Hicks White House Communications Director | Trump White House staffer Hicks, one of Trump's longest-serving and closest aides, resigned in the wake of the scandal involving former senior aide Rob Porter, whose public defense Hicks helped craft while also dating him. READ MORE FIRED432 days David Shulkin Secretary of Veterans Affairs | Trump appointee Trump once joked that his signature phrase, "you're fired" would never be used with Shulkin, but things soured early this year. Shulkin was the subject of a damning report from the department's inspector general that found the VA leader had spent a good deal of a European trip sightseeing and had inappropriately accepted a gift of Wimbledon tickets. READ MORE UNKNOWN357 days Josh Raffel Deputy Communications Director | Trump White House staffer Raffel, who was recruited to the White House by Jared Kushner, primarily served as a spokesman for Ivanka Trump and Kushner's White House initiatives, including the Office of American Innovation and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. READ MORE RESIGNED279 days John Dowd Trump's lead lawyer | Trump legal team Dowd's resignation came as Trump stepped up his attacks on special counsel Robert Mueller and days after Dowd said in a statement the investigation should end, initially claiming he was speaking for the President before saying he was only speaking for himself. READ MORE FIRED406 days Rex Tillerson Secretary of State | Trump appointee The former Exxon CEO was supposed to be a star in Trump's Cabinet, but he and the President never seemed to be on the same page. Tillerson is reported to have referred to Trump as a "moron" during a meeting. Trump tapped CIA Director Mike Pompeo as the next secretary of state. Tillerson said he'll hand over all authority on March 13, but will technically stay in office until March 31. READ MORE FIRED418 days John McEntee Personal aide to the President | Trump White House staffer McEntee was fired and escorted from the White House. Two sources said McEntee was pushed out because of issues with his security clearance, making him the latest aide to be forced out because of difficulties obtaining a permanent security clearance. Minutes later, McEntee was hired to work on Trump's re-election campaign. READ MORE RESIGNED414 days John Feeley US Ambassador to Panama | Obama appointee According to an excerpt of his resignation letter that was read to CNN, Feeley's decision was clearly prompted by differences with the Trump administration but was made before the reporting about President Donald Trump's "Bad wordhole" comments. READ MORE RESIGNED411 days Gary Cohn Chief Economic Adviser | Trump White House staffer Cohn left the White House in the wake of his fierce disagreement with the President's decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. READ MORE RESIGNED268 days Rachel Brand Associate Attorney General | Trump appointee A veteran of the George W. Bush administration, Brand's appointment to the number three position at the Justice Department was seen as a solid professional choice. She left for a job in the private sector. READ MORE RESIGNED285 days David Sorensen White House speechwriter | Trump White House staffer Sorensen resigned after being accused of domestic abuse, which he denied. He exited the same week that top White House staffer Rob Porter also resigned amid domestic abuse allegations. READ MORE RESIGNED384 days Rob Porter White House Staff Secretary | Trump White House staffer Porter resigned after two ex-wives went public with allegations of past abuse, which he denied. His security clearance had been stalled, although as staff secretary, Porter was one of the gatekeepers to Trump and the Oval Office. READ MORE RESIGNED215 days Taylor Weyeneth Deputy Chief of Staff of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy | Trump White House staffer Weyeneth, a 24-year-old former Trump campaign employee, left after a Washington Post investigation found that he had misrepresented his credentials. But weeks later he assumed a new midlevel role at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. READ MORE RESIGNED209 days Brenda Fitzgerald Director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Trump appointee Fitzgerald resigned a day after Politico reported she purchased tobacco stock after she took the position at the nation's top public health agency. READ MORE FIRED375 days Andrew McCabe FBI Deputy Director | Obama appointee A career FBI agent, McCabe resigned in late January after being a central target of Trump's ire toward the FBI. Various sources described McCabe's departure as a mutual decision, while others said it was the result of pressure to leave. On March 16, Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired McCabe over accusations he directed FBI officials to speak to the media about an investigation tied to the Clinton Foundation and misled investigators about his actions. The firing came less than two days before he was set to retire. READ MORE RESIGNED546 days Marc Short Director of Legislative Affairs | Trump White House staffer Short shepherded Trump's tax cuts to successful passage late last year in what was the high-water mark of his time in the White House. However, Short also led the unsuccessful push to repeal Obamacare, and he helped negotiate a budget deal that Trump nearly refused to sign in the spring. READ MORE RESIGNED366 days Omarosa Manigault Newman Assistant to the President and Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison |Trump White House staffer Manigault Newman was one of Trump's most high-profile African-American supporters and a former contestant on "The Apprentice." She was the top communications official at the White House Office of Public Liaison, but when chief of staff John Kelly took over, her role began to feel ill-defined, sources said. She resigned to "pursue other opportunities." READ MORE RESIGNED354 days Dina Powell Deputy National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer Powell joined the Trump administration in a senior role focused on entrepreneurship, economic growth and the empowerment of women, and in March 2017 she was named deputy national security adviser. Powell is said to have left the administration on good terms with the President. READ MORE RESIGNED309 days Jeremy Katz Deputy Director at the National Economic Council | Trump White House staffer Katz was one of the people behind the White House's push to rewrite the tax code. His resignation came after the bill was signed by Trump. READ MORE UNKNOWN347 days Rick Dearborn Deputy White House Chief of Staff | Trump White House staffer Dearborn, who previously served as Jeff Sessions' chief of staff in the Senate for several years, left the White House in early 2018 to pursue work in the private sector. Dearborn had a wide portfolio in the White House, overseeing its political operation, public outreach and legislative affairs. READ MORE RESIGNED209 days George Sifakis Assistant to the President and Director of the Office of Public Liaison | Trump White House staffer Sifakis left the administration shortly after former chief of staff Reince Priebus, a close ally and personal friend, made his own exit. READ MORE RESIGNED232 days Tom Price Health and Human Services Secretary | Trump appointee Price resigned in the midst of a scandal over his use of private planes. He was being investigated by the department's inspector general for private flights that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Price insisted that his trips had been approved. READ MORE RESIGNED244 days Keith Schiller Director of Oval Office Operations | Trump White House staffer Schiller was a longtime Trump aide and confidant. He's the one who went to the FBI to notify James Comey that he was fired. He told associates in early September that he planned to leave at the end of the month and that the reason was financial. But the move came shortly after Kelly became chief of staff with the mission of instilling new order inside Trump's often chaotic White House. READ MORE UNKNOWN214 days Sebastian Gorka White House deputy assistant | Trump White House staffer Gorka was one of Trump's most prominent cheerleaders, frequently hitting the airwaves to defend the President's national security policies and public statements. But his role outside of television appearances was unclear. READ MORE RESIGNED211 days Carl Icahn Special Adviser on Regulatory Reform | Adviser Icahn stepped down in August 2017. He was criticized by Democrats who said his advisory role created a conflict of interest because he had not taken a formal government job and was still running his businesses. READ MORE FIRED211 days Steve Bannon White House Chief Strategist | Trump White House staffer The President, whose relationship was already souring with Bannon, fired his chief strategist after Bannon was quoted contradicting Trump in American Prospect magazine. Bannon returned to his role as executive chairman of Breitbart News, but lost that position shortly after his incendiary comments about the Trump White House were revealed in Michael Wolff's book 'Fire and Fury.' READ MORE FIRED195 days Ezra Cohen-Watnick Senior Director for Intelligence on the National Security Council | Trump White House staffer Cohen-Watnick came under scrutiny for his alleged roundabout role in providing incidental foreign surveillance information concerning members of Trump's team to GOP Rep. Devin Nunes, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. Nunes later told CNN that it was definitely not Cohen-Watnick who provided him the information. READ MORE RESIGNED193 days George Gigicos White House Director of Scheduling and Advance | Trump White House staffer Gigicos said he would return to his consulting business and work for the Trump 2020 campaign. Gigicos was later fired for work on the campaign because of the size of crowds at an Arizona rally in August, 2017. READ MORE FIRED11 days Anthony Scaramucci White House Communications Director | Trump White House staffer "The Mooch" resigned after a profanity-laced interview with The New Yorker. Scaramucci was the third White House communications director to leave the post. He held the job for just 10 days. READ MORE FIRED190 days Reince Priebus White House Chief of Staff | Trump White House staffer Resigned after months of speculation he would be ousted by the administration. "The President wanted to go a different direction," he told CNN. READ MORE FIRED183 days Derek Harvey National Security Council Adviser | Trump White House staffer Harvey, a longtime intelligence officer, was appointed by former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn during his short tenure. The National Security Council did not provide a specific reason for Harvey's removal. READ MORE UNKNOWN187 days Michael Short Assistant Press Secretary | Trump White House staffer Resigned or fired by Anthony Scaramucci, ostensibly to stop leaks to the media. Responding to reports that he was being linked to White House leaks, Short said "the entire premise is false." READ MORE FIRED183 days Rich Higgins Strategic Planning Aide | Trump White House staffer Higgins allegedly wrote a memo that purports to unravel a deep state conspiracy theory about a coordinated effort to delegitimize and destroy the President. The reason Higgins was fired was not made public. READ MORE RESIGNED183 days Sean Spicer White House Press Secretary | Trump White House staffer Spicer resigned after Scaramucci was named the new White House communications director, capping off a roller coaster six-month tenure as the chief spokesman for an administration besieged by a steady drumbeat of controversy. READ MORE RESIGNED50 days Mark Corallo Spokesman and Communications Strategist for Trump's legal team | Trump legal team Corallo's resignation came after weeks of simmering tension between the White House and the President's legal team. He declined to comment on the circumstances of his departure. His exact start date is unclear. READ MORE RESIGNED181 days Walter Shaub Office of Government Ethics Director | Obama appointee Accepted a position with the Campaign Legal Center after months of clashes with the administration over Trump's refusal to divest his businesses. Shaub had served as director of the Office of Government Ethics under President Obama since 2013. READ MORE UNKNOWN168 days Tera Dahl Deputy Chief of Staff for the National Security Council | Trump White House staffer Dahl, a former Breitbart writer and ally of Steve Bannon's, left after less than six months on the National Security Council for a role "that she wants" at the US Agency for International Development. READ MORE RESIGNED119 days Michael Dubke White House Communications Director | Trump White House staffer Dubke said he had "a good conversation with the President" after submitting his resignation. He declined to discuss the turmoil inside the West Wing, saying only that he was resigning "for a number of reasons -- for personal reasons." Dubke's exact start date is unclear. READ MORE FIRED110 days James Comey FBI Director | Obama appointee The Trump administration attributed Comey's dismissal to his handling of the investigation into Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's email server, but Democrats ridiculed that notion, raising parallels to Watergate-era firings and suggesting Comey was getting too close to the White House with the Russia probe. READ MORE UNKNOWN106 days Angella Reid White House Chief Usher | Non-political White House employee Left the Trump administration after 106 days. She had served as White House Chief Usher under President Obama since 2011. No specific reason was given for her departure. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said, "It's not uncommon that you might have a transition when a new administration comes in and it's simply nothing more than that." READ MORE RESIGNED95 days Vivek Murthy Surgeon General | Obama appointee Murthy resigned at the request of the White House after assisting in the transition to the Trump administration. He continues as a member of the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps READ MORE RESIGNED80 days K.T. McFarland Deputy National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer McFarland was top deputy to Michael Flynn before his firing. She was to leave her post in the White House to become US ambassador to Singapore, but that fell through after Democrats objected to her nomination. READ MORE RESIGNED70 days Katie Walsh Deputy Chief of Staff | Trump White House staffer Walsh was Reince Priebus' deputy, joining him in the administration after serving as his chief of staff when he was chairman of the Republican National Committee. She left to serve as a senior adviser to America First Policies, a nonprofit group helmed by former Trump campaign officials.READ MORE FIRED25 days Michael Flynn National Security Adviser | Trump White House staffer Forced to resign amid claims he misled the administration over his communications with Russia during the transition. In early December 2017, Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. He is cooperating with Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. READ MORE FIRED11 days Sally Yates US Deputy Attorney General | Obama appointee Fired when she was acting attorney general because she refused to implement the first iteration of Trump's ban on travelers from a number of Muslim-majority countries. Trump had tapped Yates to serve as interim attorney general while Jeff Sessions went through Senate confirmation. Yates also served as deputy attorney general under President Obama. READ MORE
  15. WARNING: CONS and MAGAts rarely post links. When they to check them out and read the text. Criminals like Golfboy wants you to believe that Hillary Clinton paid to have Steele gather information about Trump. The Steele Dossier was paid for by Republicans and the Washington Free Beacon, a conservative publication funded by the billionaire Paul Singer, to scrutinize Mr. Trump, with the evident goal of uncovering dirt to help his Republican primary opponents. What Golfboy didn't tell you... Agents did not believe that either the source or Mr. Steele was deliberately inventing things, according to the former official. How the dossier ended up loaded with dubious or exaggerated details remains uncertain, but the document may be the result of a high-stakes game of telephone, in which rumors and hearsay were passed from source to source. Another possibility — one that Mr. Steele has not ruled out — could be Russian disinformation. That would mean that in addition to carrying out an effective attack on the Clinton campaign, Russian spymasters hedged their bets and placed a few land mines under Mr. Trump’s presidency as well. Oleg D. Kalugin, a former K.G.B. general who now lives outside Washington, saw that as plausible. “Russia has huge experience in spreading false information,” he said. Mr. Trump’s former lawyer Michael D. Cohen negotiated for a Trump Tower project in Moscow many months into the campaign — and later admitted lying about it to Congress, along with tax evasion and other crimes. But Mr. Cohen did not, as the dossier claimed, travel to Prague to conspire in the Russian hacking of Democrats, the Mueller report makes clear. Here is the most important fact that Golfboi left out... The dossier began as part of a conventional opposition research operation by a small Washington firm, Fusion GPS. During the early part of the campaign, Fusion was paid by The Washington Free Beacon, a conservative publication funded by the billionaire Paul Singer, to scrutinize Mr. Trump, with the evident goal of uncovering dirt to help his Republican primary opponents.
×