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JoeAverage

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  1. There is no doubt people stupid enough to trade a long term good paying job and a more stable economy for a one time check of $15-20k to their household. You can't fix stupid!
  2. If you are laughing, you don't have someone close to you working on the front lines.
  3. Except for the ones who have fake S.S. Numbers: Nearly 40 million Social Security numbers have been stolen and used by illegal immigrants and others to get work, according to agency records obtained by an immigration reform group. The Immigration Reform Law Institute said that from 2012 to 2016 there were “39 million instances where names and Social Security numbers on W-2 tax forms did not match the corresponding Social Security records.” The group said that there is a “thriving black market” used by illegal immigrants to get Social Security numbers needed to get a job. Their report draws attention to a move by former President Barack Obama to stop sending so-called “no match” letters to employers notifying them that numbers used by employees on the wage forms do not match their identity.
  4. Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the national pro-life group Susan B. Anthony List, told LifeNews she is glad the Senate bill is abortion free. “Congress did right by the American people by successfully applying the Hyde Amendment to funds in the coronavirus supplemental bill. This is vital to continue longstanding precedent that health-related funds are always life-affirming. Americans should not have to worry about whether or not emergency funds related to a legitimate health crisis could be ill-used for abortion-related purposes. We are thankful to Congress for working in a bipartisan fashion to pass this legislation that preserves Hyde protections. We commend President Trump and his administration for their unwavering leadership and insistence on Hyde protections. In this time of uncertainty, we will continue to work diligently to defend the lives of the unborn.” Damn Will, put a little more thought into your OP Titles.
  5. Saw Santana last fall at the House of Blues in Vegas, a check on the bucket list, simply amazing. LOL, you may want to change your anniversary date and buy tickets!
  6. A little more information: There is also some information in this article for people collecting Social Security. https://www.krem.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/stimulus-checks-social-security-tax-returns/293-e9d86afa-67b6-472e-bf2f-b598e7fcc0d3 Kiplinger reports that those who don’t get a check now won’t lose out on the money – they’ll just have to wait until next year to get it. As the bill is written right now, checks that will be sent now are actually just advanced payments of a new refundable tax credit for the 2020 tax year. If you do not get a stimulus payment in 2020, you can claim it next year as a refund or reduction of the tax you owe if you file a 2020 tax return by April 15, 2021. Will the money I get be taxed later? No. The check you receive is really just an advanced payment of a tax credit for the 2020 tax year, according to Kiplinger. It won't be included in your taxable income. And no, you will not have to repay the money. It is a direct payment given to help Americans through tough economic times and yours to keep.
  7. He ever discover the earth is round and not flat?
  8. Best I can tell, the stimulus check literally is free money, not an advance against future refunds. Found this at WSJ: The advance payments will be determined based on 2019 income—or 2018 income if that is all that is available to IRS—and the final amount of the benefits will be determined based on 2020 income and settled on the 2020 tax return. So people who ultimately qualify for more money than they receive this year—a person whose income drops from $100,000 to $70,000, for example—would get the rest through a larger tax refund or smaller tax payment in early 2021. But people who ultimately qualify for less money than they got this year—a person whose income rises from $70,000 to $100,000—wouldn’t have to pay it back. https://www.wsj.com/articles/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-payments-from-the-government-11585229988
  9. Sure. Just clarifying this statement: Found this at WSJ: The advance payments will be determined based on 2019 income—or 2018 income if that is all that is available to IRS—and the final amount of the benefits will be determined based on 2020 income and settled on the 2020 tax return. So people who ultimately qualify for more money than they receive this year—a person whose income drops from $100,000 to $70,000, for example—would get the rest through a larger tax refund or smaller tax payment in early 2021. But people who ultimately qualify for less money than they got this year—a person whose income rises from $70,000 to $100,000—wouldn’t have to pay it back. https://www.wsj.com/articles/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-payments-from-the-government-11585229988 Sorry, kind of anal about details. It appears that it is not any kind of "advance" on future tax returns or refunds. Looks like straight up free money to me.
  10. Would be interesting to know how they came up with the number. $75k for an individual, $150k for a couple. It is my understanding it is in no way connected to future returns or refunds and is also not taxable. Details in the fine print, where did I put that 2500x microscope,,,,,
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