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Trump Scandals: Every Investigation Facing the White House So Far


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#26 MidnightMax

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 07:19 PM

Excellent Scout!

 

You mean using the SAME TACTICS you use are EXCELLENT??

 

I got to remember that one for next time you post your "Bush did it' bullshit!!

 

Sucks being a double-sided ASSHOLE, huh, beanie SHITSTAIN???
 


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94689b598de91fa9094dcbfa3b520105.jpg


#27 benson13

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 05:17 AM

and there's (3-votes) ROTFLMAO
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#28 SCOOBYDOO

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 05:25 AM

and there's (3-votes) ROTFLMAO

looks like mailbox boy will make 500-600 meaningless post today!


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In order to succeed, we must first believe that we can. 

 

18582304_10155830791736729_6013222210277
 


#29 benson13

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 05:59 AM

and his brother Klan-Man, Jr KKK Samples
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#30 king of the county

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 06:01 AM

Add Hillary and cf
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"I always get the feeling that when lesbians look at me, they're thinking, 'That's why I'm not a heterosexual.'"


#31 benson13

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 06:35 AM

and there's Democrat, king of the country
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#32 butchyboy

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 06:46 AM

I think what is happening is Trump is trying to do what he promised he would do, and is being met with obstruction and the media lairs every step of the way. What haven't any of these "scandals" been proven? Why is it always an "un-named"  source, or a headline reading "Trump could have..." LOL. You might as well claim "According a former employees brothers mothers sisters next door neighbors cousins room-mate, postman."


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#33 Zaro

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 06:48 AM

I think what is happening is Trump is trying to do what he promised he would do, and is being met with obstruction and the media lairs every step of the way. What haven't any of these "scandals" been proven? Why is it always an "un-named"  source, or a headline reading "Trump could have..." LOL. You might as well claim "According a former employees brothers mothers sisters next door neighbors cousins room-mate, postman."


You need to calm down
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biting the hand that feeds my mojo

#34 Chongo

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 07:15 AM

The first four months of Trumps presidency have been loaded with scandal

From the get-go, Donald Trump's presidency has been loaded up with scandals that have enraged his Democrat opponents and challenged the willingness of Beltway Republicans to stand by him. The growing pile of federal investigations and news reports reached a boiling point with Trump's firing of James Comey. In case you can't keep everything straight, here's what's happened so far and who in Trump's circle is being investigated.


Paul Manafort: Trump's former campaign chair is currently being investigated as part of the FBI's look into potential connections between Trump's campaign and Russia's attempt to sway the presidential election. The Justice Department has subpoenaed Manafort's bank records to look for potential payments that he might have received from Russia during the campaign.

Carter Page: The Washington Post reported in April that the FBI had obtained a warrant to monitor Trump's former campaign adviser as part of their Russia investigation. A dossier compiled by a former British intelligence officer and cited by House Dem Adam Schiff claimed that Page had met with Russian business executives linked to Putin during a visit to Moscow in July 2016.

Michael Flynn: A retired three-star general, Flynn was selected as Trump's first national security adviser before he was fired in February. The dismissal came after it was discovered Flynn lied to Vice President Mike Pence about his interactions with Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak. The scandal surrounding Flynn deepened after the House Oversight Committee said they had reason to believe Flynn received payments from the Russian and Turkish governments.

Conflicts of Interest: Since winning the election, ethics experts have criticized Trump for failing to provide a sufficient plan for addressing conflicts of interest between his presidency and his many business interests, whom he has handed over to his sons, Donald and Eric. The White House also faced criticism when senior adviser Kellyanne Conway promoted Ivanka Trump's merchandise on Fox News. The State Department also deleted a blog post promoting Trump's Florida estate, Mar-a-Lago. Trump has at least one lawsuit claiming he has violated the Emoluments Clause, which forbids the president from receiving foreign money through his businesses, something POTUS' critics say he can do by having foreign officials stay at his hotels.

Russia Oval Office Visit: The Washington Post reported that Trump disclosed a highly classified intelligence to Russian officials during a White House visit, handing over a source that provided the U.S. with information on ISIS. The disclosure has reportedly frustrated the intelligence community, with whom the president has established a tense relationship.

Jeff Sessions: After admitting he had not disclosed meetings with a Russian ambassador during the election to Congress, the former Alabama senator and current Attorney General recused himself from any investigations into Trump-Russia connections. After Comey's firing, 11 Senate Democrats, including Elizabeth Warren, asked the Justice Dept. to investigate whether Sessions had violated his recusal pledge after Trump announced he had consulted Sessions on firing the FBI director.

Comey Memo: The New York Times reported that a memo written by Comey shows that Trump asked the FBI director to end the bureau's investigation into Michael Flynn. Jason Chaffetz, GOP head of the House Oversight Committee, has demanded the FBI turn over all info pertaining to interactions between Trump and Comey.

 

  No reports on hostile refugees, drug gang corruption and the fact that we had no money for the humanitarian effort that created refugees in the first place. We have even less money to bring them over here for possible civilian attacks after bombing them out of their own area. No reports on why the US is consuming food toxins that most other countrys will not allow.

 

Media message is clear, eat poison, receive unreported violent attacks and die while we get all picky, fussy, goofy about friendly Russian people for no apparent reason.
 




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#35 butchyboy

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 07:17 AM

You need to calm down

I am always calm. Please stop misrepresenting me.


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#36 Zaro

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 07:21 AM

I am always calm. Please stop misrepresenting me.


^^ emotional train wreck
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biting the hand that feeds my mojo

#37 benson13

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 07:24 AM

"What haven't any of these "scandals" been proven?"


Its comin!!
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#38 benson13

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 10:08 AM

Experts: Trump is edging closer to 'impeachment territory'


It's been a tumultuous two weeks for the White House.

In brief, the last 11 days have included:

May 9, when Trump fired FBI director James Comey, who was spearheading an investigation into the president's associates' ties to Russia.
May 10, when Trump met with and Russian officials Sergey Lavrov and Sergey Kislyak in the Oval Office, during which the president shared highly-classified intelligence from Israel about the Islamic State.
May 11, when Trump admitted that the Russia investigation played a role in his decision to fire Comey.
May 16, when news broke that Trump reportedly asked Comey in February to drop the FBI's investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn over his contact with Russian officials, a charge that many Democrats speculated could be considered obstruction of justice. Trump denied the account.
May 17, when the US Justice Department appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as an independent special counsel to oversee the Russia investigation.
May 19, when it was reported that Trump called Comey a "nut job" in his meeting with Russian officials and said his decision to fire the FBI director eased "great pressure" from the Russia probe.
The flood of bombshell reports against the president has prompted some lawmakers and pundits to ask a version of the same question: Can Trump be impeached for indiscretions that critics believe jeopardize national security and may amount to an obstruction of justice?

Since Trump took office, over a dozen lawmakers from both parties have either discussed or actively promoted the president's impeachment. Democratic Rep. Al Green even called for Trump's impeachment on the House floor on Wednesday.

A Public Policy Polling survey released May 18 found that more Americans support Trump's impeachment than oppose it (albeit with a significant partisan divide). After news broke of Comey's memo, which alleges that Trump asked him to drop the Flynn investigation, a growing number of officials and legal analysts began considering the possibility of impeachment. The White House even began doing its due diligence on the matter, as lawyers began preparing for what they called a distant possibility.

Experts say that it's unlikely Trump would be impeached over these events — at least, not yet. But they say he's edging closer to the line.

'We're in presidential impeachment territory'
Comey's memo, if it does exist, "would be very damaging" to the president, Keith E. Whittington, an expert on presidential impeachment and politics professor at Princeton University, told Business Insider.

James Comey
Former FBI Director James Comey. AP Photo/Alex Brandon
"I've spent a lot of time studying [presidential impeachment]. We're in presidential impeachment territory," Whittington tweeted on Monday, before news of Comey's memo broke.

The memo fills in a number of details around Trump-Russia ties and what the president's motives were in firing the former FBI director, Whittington said. If Congress pursues those details, depending on what they find, this latest development may "open the door" to exploring the groundwork for presidential impeachment, he added.

And the decision over whether or not to impeach Trump over his dissemination of classified info or Comey's memo may not even come down to a question of legality.

"It may be that he's acting completely within his legal authority and yet still has abused his office in ways that might rise to the level of impeachable offenses," Whittington said. "But that would have to be something that would need to be explored through congressional hearings.

Since Watergate, many people have said that an impeachable offense is whatever the House and the Senate think it is.
Bob Deitz, a former top lawyer for the NSA and CIA, told Business Insider as much.

"I can imagine a lot of people saying, 'Look, I don't care whether what Trump did is felonious or not. But the comment itself has brought disgrace upon the White House, and therefore, we think he should be impeached for that,'" Deitz said.

And because the Supreme Court has never explicitly defined what an impeachable offense is, "since Watergate, many people have said that an impeachable offense is whatever the House and the Senate think it is," Deitz said. "It's a cynical take, but it may very well be true."

'No partisan nonsense'
An effective assessment of whether Trump has committed an impeachable offense also requires a fully-functional Congress, and that has been a source of concern among many critics who feel that officials and lawmakers may place party over country.

Preet Bharara, the former US attorney for the Southern District of New York who was fired by Trump in March, vocalized those concerns in a Washington Post op-ed titled, "Are there still public servants who will say no to the president?"

In light of Comey's abrupt dismissal while the FBI was investigating Trump's ties to Russia, Bharara argued that "we need a truly bipartisan investigation in Congress. That means no partisan nonsense — just a commitment to finding the facts, whatever they may be, proving (or disproving) Russian interference in our election and anything related."

republican senators mitch mcconnell
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is flanked by fellow Republican leaders during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington on September 13, 2016. Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
"Congress is a check and a balance," he added, "and never more important than when a bullying chief executive used to his own way seems not to remember the co-equal status of the other two branches."

And that criticism doesn't apply just to Republicans who have appeared hesitant to criticize the president. The number of Democrats who have called for Trump's impeachment since he took office doesn't help the situation either, Whittington said.

Democrats' concerns, though often outlined by lawmakers as critical to the foundation of democracy, "have not been so much about the exceptional circumstances of Trump as much as just partisan disagreements," Whittington said. And in cases where there were potential constitutional concerns — like in the case of Trump's travel ban — he has been checked by the judicial branch a number of times.

Lawmakers should be capable of stepping back and recognizing that "sometimes you just disagree and mistakes get made, but they don't necessarily rise to the level of threatening the constitutional system," Whittington said.

Instead of discussing the possibility of impeachment, Whittington said, it seems more appropriate to examine whether Trump breached his oath of office, which many experts say he did.

"I think that would be the concern," Whittington said. "I think that's the right thing to be looking at and to be thinking about," he said, adding that the focus at this point should be urging Congress to hold the president to account.

Bipartisan support for Mueller stepping in
Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle applauded the move to appoint Mueller as special counsel to oversee the Justice Department's investigation into the Trump campaign's ties to Russia, and whether his associates colluded with the Kremlin's tampering of the 2016 election.

robert mueller testifies before Congress
FBI Director Robert Mueller AP Images
Rosenstein made the appointment after multiple revelations in the last 11 days threatened to derail the investigation.

Though Rosenstein is second-in-command at the DOJ, he has the authority to make the special-counsel appointment because Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from all Russia-related investigative matters after his campaign-trail meetings with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak that he failed to disclose during confirmation hearings for his role as attorney general came to light.

Experts say Mueller's appointment as special prosecutor in the Russia investigation will also ensure that it proceeds smoothly after a rocky start.

"I have enormous respect for Bob. We worked together when I was at the NSA," Deitz, who worked with Mueller when he headed the FBI, told Business Insider.

"The Russia investigation will continue apace with no loss of momentum," Deitz said. And if more evidence of Trump's or his associates' ties to Russia emerges, he said, Mueller's appointment means "the president may have gone from the frying pan into the fire."

The steady drip of new details about Trump and his associates' ties to Russia necessitated the need for a special prosecutor, Glenn Carle, a former CIA clandestine-services officer, told Business Insider. Carle called Mueller "solid," "impartial," and "professional," and also added that Mueller's appointment may temporarily stall the Russia investigation.

"Things will slow down because Mueller will be deliberate and thorough," Carle said. While he said the investigation's likely slowed pace may reduce the day-to-day tumult that has rocked the White House over the past few days, Carle added that it was likely Trump would try to "divert attention by having surrogates attack Mueller's independence and integrity."

But given Mueller's reputation as an apolitical, independent prosecutor and the precarious position the White House is currently in, Carle said, "it will be difficult for him to do so, and the costs would be high."

'Eventually the dam bursts and there is a tide'
Since the president himself has repeatedly declared that he was within his rights to take a number of actions he's taken over the last week, including Comey's ouster and repeatedly insisting that he has nothing to do with Russia, others are calling on him to back those claims up.

"If what Donald Trump says is true, that he has never done anything wrong either in the campaign or as president, he should welcome an impeachment investigation as a chance to clear the air," Allan J. Lichtman told Business Insider Germany in an interview. Lichtman has predicted every US election winner since 1984.

Donald Trump
Donald Trump. Pool/Getty Images
"He should release all documents, all presidential tapes, if they exist. I would call upon him to do so. If he doesn’t do that that’s an indication he has something to hide," Lichtman added.

Lichtman also said that Republicans have been "cagey" so far.

"But it's like a dam," he said. "There's a little bit of a trickle at first, and then eventually the dam bursts and there is a tide."

The case is "becoming too compelling for even Republicans to resist an impeachment inquiry," which they may be tempted to use "to get to the bottom of the many controversies swirling around this administration," he later added.

"Otherwise it's going to be drip, drip, drip, which is not good — even for Republicans," Lichtman said.

Deitz agreed and compared the current situation to the buildup to Watergate. "Republicans all lined up behind Nixon before the really damaging stuff broke," he said. "When it came out that he may have abused his power or broken the law, Republicans fled from him like rats from a ship."

"We got to wait and see whether that Republican dam is going to burst," Lichtman said.

SEE ALSO: Trump reportedly asked Comey to end the investigation into Michael Flynn before Comey was fired
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#39 Hex2

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 08:23 PM

18557288_10155313572846779_5578113622841

 

That is the excuse for so many of the cons here.

 

5Gold Stars


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#40 doodsaq

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 08:24 PM

anigif_sub-buzz-14585-1495289748-2.gif

Such a cute, dainty little curtsy.
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08-trump-baldwin.w529.h529.jpg

 

"Very, very stupid. Beautiful, tremendous."


#41 Hex2

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 08:32 PM

anigif_sub-buzz-14585-1495289748-2.gif

Such a cute, dainty little curtsy.

 

How sweet,

 

Looks like the woman in the background it sticking a dildo up his ass.


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#42 doodsaq

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 08:34 PM

 
How sweet,
 
Looks like the woman in the background it sticking a dildo up his ass.


I think you may be correct, sir. Didn't notice that, thanks.
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08-trump-baldwin.w529.h529.jpg

 

"Very, very stupid. Beautiful, tremendous."


#43 Arris

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 08:37 PM

:D  LOL


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#44 shintao

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 12:33 AM

I think what is happening is Trump is trying to do what he promised he would do, and is being met with obstruction and the media lairs every step of the way. What haven't any of these "scandals" been proven? Why is it always an "un-named"  source, or a headline reading "Trump could have..." LOL. You might as well claim "According a former employees brothers mothers sisters next door neighbors cousins room-mate, postman."

Obstruction = Unconstitutional BS


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palm11.jpg                                 swamp_zpsknxrdpuu.jpg

 

SO WHERE IS THAT FUCKING WALL TRUMP PROMISED US??

 

One tin soldier walked away ~

 

Donald Trump, a serial liar, narcissist, failed businessman, political con artist, adulterer, professed grabber of women’s genitals without their permission, man who does not read, ignoramus, admirer and fan of despots and dictators, encourager of vigilante violence against innocent people, actor in a porn video, person who does not pay his employees, member of the Vladimir Putin fan club, racist landlord, preferred candidate of neo-Nazis and other fringe racists, professional wrestling villain, and candidate who incites violence against his political opponents, is now the 45th president of the United States of America.

 

 


#45 rick55

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 06:32 AM

List of indictments and convictions:


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#46 benson13

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 07:53 AM

Hurry home Trampy...We're waiting for you

ROTFLMFAO!


Its not an Intelligence Investigaton any longer...Its now a CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
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#47 Golfboy

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 07:53 AM

I love watching the leftwing loons trying to create some new "outrage of the day".
I almost feel sorry for them, then I just start laughing.   lol-047.gif


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.
.

When Caught Changing his Own Posts, ES wasn't man enough to admit the truth.
Just like STILL refuses to admit he posts as "Reasonable" on the other side. 

ES will always be my bitch .
 

So you have no money to bet. Just what I thought.
Fine loser goes away forever ...
but I'm going to miss mocking your inane childlike stupidity.
I got a good hunch you're no man of your word and you won't honor the bet.


#48 benson13

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 07:54 AM

36%

and we're 'inventing'??
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